Unified Interior Regions

Montana

Welcome to the Midwest Region! Our region includes 18 Science Centers in 11 States from the Great Lakes to the Dakotas, south to Missouri and Kentucky. Our streamgage network is used to monitor and assess water resources across the region. Other research focuses on fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, midcontinental plant/animal species, invasive species, wildlife disease, and energy and mining.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 197
Date published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier - Panorama

The 1913 image of Sperry Glacier shows the thickness of the glacial ice that once covered the Sperry basin. Now, at approximately 1/3 of it's maximum area, Sperry Glacier continues to recede at a rapid rate. It is one of the glaciers that USGS scientists are monitoring as a benchmark glacier.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier from Comeau Pass

The expanse of Sperry Glacier that once greeted hikers facing NE on Comeau Pass is in stark contrast to the bedrock and vegetation that has since emerged as the ice retreated. The Marble image, most likely taken in the 1920s or early 1930s, was featured on a postcard with this caption: " Sperry Glacier from the river."

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Sperry Glacier

The northwest portion of Sperry Glacier once spanned Comeau Pass to the base of Edwards Mountain.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Shepard Glacier 1913 - 2005

Shepard Glacier from Pyramid Peak, Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Shepard Glacier 1911 - 2005

Shepard Glacier in Glacier National Park. The red line on the 2005 image illustrates glacier retreat from 1911 to 2005.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Sexton Glacier

Sexton Glacier from bench below Siyeh Pass, Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Piegan Glacier

Piegan Glacier is one of the few glaciers in Glacier National Park that has not significantly changed since photographed in the 1930s.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 11, 2016

Red Eagle Glacier

Although the 2009 photo location does not exactly match the historic photo station, a comparison of relative glacial coverage can still be made. Logan Glacier is in the foreground, while Red Eagle Glacier sits beneath the pyramidal peak that bears the same name. It appears that these two glaciers were joined at the time the historic photo was taken, but recessed into their own basins as time...

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 10, 2016
Status: Active

Bighorn Sheep in and near Glacier National Park

USGS collected GPS data as well as genetic and other samples on over 100 bighorn sheep east of the Continental Divide in Glacier National Park, Waterton National Park, and the Blackfeet Reservation. Bighorn sheep across the west are vulnerable to disease such as pneumonia. We are therefore working to improve our understanding of bighorn sheep movements, approaches for monitoring bighorns, and...

Date published: April 9, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Elk on Department of Interior Lands in Southwest Wyoming

Between 2005 and 2010, we radio- collared 61 female elk (Cervus elaphus) on Fossil Butte National Monument and 12 female elk near Cokeville, Wyoming, slightly northwest of the Monument, all from the West Green River herd. We are using the 209,250 locations from these elk to identify seasonal distribution patterns, evaluate habitat use, and assess factors influencing the timing of migration.  ...

Date published: April 8, 2016

Jackson Glacier

At the time this historic photograph was taken in 1911, Blackfoot Glacier encompassed the current Jackson Glacier. By 1939, Blackfoot Glacier's recession had resulted in two distinct glaciers, Jackson and Blackfoot. This photo pair shows glacial recession and successive vegetation growth along Jackson Glacier's terminus.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Date published: April 8, 2016

Iceberg Glacier circa 1940 - 2008

Iceberg Glacier in Glacier National Park.

Contacts: Lisa McKeon
Filter Total Items: 272
Close-up view of tweezers picking up an ichthyoplankton sample.
June 28, 2016

Ichthyoplankton Sample

Typical contents of a net deployment showing larval fish, possibly pallid sturgeon.

The ADCP boat on the river
June 28, 2016

ADCP Boat

A US Geological Survey hydroacoustic survey boat measures velocity profiles on the Upper Missouri River.

Scientists in a boat reviewing data on a computer
June 28, 2016

ADCP Data Review

Research hydrologist Dr. Susannah Erwin and hydrologic technician Brian Anderson inspect ADCP data on the Upper Missouri River.

A person's hands with gloves on looking at a drift sampe
June 27, 2016

Processing a Drift Sample

Student Contractor Garrett Cook processes a drift sample collected on June 27 shortly after the free embryos and beads were released. Note the small cluster of pallid sturgeon free embryos and green beads in the lower portion of the sorting tray. These embryos and beads were elements of the Upper Missouri River drift experiment.

People distributing free embryos to boats
June 27, 2016

Distribution of Free Embryos to Boats

Distribution of free embryos to boats in preparation for mass release.

People on boats releasing larva into the water.
June 27, 2016

Larval Release

Simultaneous mass release of 700,000 free embryos from boats distributed across the channel of the Upper Missouri River.

People sitting and standing listening to scientists talking.
June 27, 2016

Pre-Sample Briefing

Pre-deployment briefing for the Upper Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Drift Study. Fish biologists and physical scientists from Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks, US Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, University of Montana, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, and US Army Corps of Engineers go over the sample design and assignments.

Photo of a red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River near Fort Peck Dam, Montana.
June 26, 2016

Red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River in Montana

USGS scientists conducted a dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River about 10 miles downstream of Fort Peck Dam, Montana. The public can expect to see the Yellowstone River turn a similar color in the vicinity of the injection site when scientists conduct a dye study near Glendive, Montana in late June, 2017.

Red dye viewable in a river
June 26, 2016

Dye Delivery

The rhodamine-WT dye was injected in the river uniformly across the channel.

Scientists on a boat preparing a dye study
June 26, 2016

Dye Preparation

USGS scientists prepare to mix rhodamine-WT dye for the dye trace experiment.  The suits are to keep the harmless dye off of clothing.

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.
June 24, 2016

Fish Swimming on Gravel Bed

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.

 Blackfeet Environmental Office personnel groundwater sampling
June 1, 2016

Blackfeet Environmental Office personnel groundwater sampling

USGS hydrologist trains Blackfeet Enviromental Office staff to collect groundwater samples on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation

Filter Total Items: 128
USGS
January 17, 2001

Metal concentrations were found to be elevated in riverbed sediments and fish tissue samples at sites downstream from significant natural mineral sources associated with hard-rock mining activities in the Clark Fork and Spokane River basins, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior.

USGS
May 18, 2000

In a ground-breaking study that used DNA from bear hair to count bears without having to see them or to capture them, U.S.Geological Survey researchers have preliminary results showing that there are an estimated 437 grizzly bears in the northern third portion of the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem and an estimated 332 grizzly bears in Glacier National Park itself.

USGS
March 16, 2000

Lecture on ground-breaking genetic sampling of GRIZZLY BEARS in Glacier National Park, Montana

USGS
November 10, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Katherine Kendall has received the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for her outstanding leadership in the study of grizzly and black bears in Glacier National Park, Mont. and the surrounding area.

USGS
July 21, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Dr. Thomas J. Roffe received the Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for his outstanding contributions to wildlife health and natural resources management in the Greater Yellowstone Area during a recent meeting of the Greater Yellowstone Interagency Brucellosis Committee.

USGS
July 14, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist, Dr. Daniel Fagre, received the Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for his outstanding leadership of the Global Change Research Program in Glacier National Park, Montana.

USGS
April 5, 1999

Recent advances in genetic technology that allow scientists to study bear populations without handling bears is the topic of Katherine Kendall’s lecture scheduled for April 5 in Room 3004 at the Main Interior Building at 1849 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Reporters are invited to attend and cover the event. Kendall will be available to address questions following her lecture.

USGS
March 29, 1999

Recent advances in genetic technology that allow scientists to study bear populations without handling bears is the topic of Katherine Kendall’s lecture scheduled for April 1st at the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Visitor Center. Reporters are invited to attend and cover the event. Kendall will be available to address questions following her lecture.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center