Unified Interior Regions

Montana

Welcome to the Midwest Region! Our region includes 18 Science Centers in 11 States from the Great Lakes to the Dakotas, south to Missouri and Kentucky. Our streamgage network is used to monitor and assess water resources across the region. Other research focuses on fisheries and aquatic ecosystems, midcontinental plant/animal species, invasive species, wildlife disease, and energy and mining.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 198
Date published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Apex Sites

In contrast to RARMI study areas in Colorado that have 10 or more years of records of continuous population monitoring, there are fewer long-term datasets for amphibian populations in the northern Rocky Mountains. The exception is an ongoing study of Columbia spotted frogs at Lodge Creek, Yellowstone National Park. Three other long-term research and monitoring areas have been established in...

Date published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Apex Sites

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as...

Date published: March 15, 2016
Status: Completed

COMPLETED: Using thermal imagery to assess wolf hairloss from sarcoptic mange

Researchers at NOROCK and their partners used thermal cameras at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana to assess the amount of heat lost under a range of environmental conditions with and without hair. These methods help scientists better understand how mange operates in wild wolves throughout the Greater...

Contacts: Paul Cross, Ph.D., Emily Almberg, Doug Smith, Adam Munn, Peter Hudson, John Heine, Dan Stahler, Shane Maloney
Date published: March 15, 2016

Identification of Fire Refugia in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada: Development and Application of the Refugium Concept for Biodiversity Conservation over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales

We described the climate space of fire regimes in northwestern North America (Whitman and others 2015), and we are refining an approach to identify fire refugia – areas that do not burn or burn with lower severity through multiple fire events. We continue our collaboration to test the function of refugia for biodiversity conservation under current and future climate and fire scenarios. We...

Date published: March 10, 2016

Geneva Chong's Past Projects

These are Geneva Chong's past projects.

Date published: March 2, 2016
Status: Active

Integrated bioassessment of imperiled alpine aquatic ecosystems using NPS vital signs and USGS research data: Implications for conservation under a warming climate

Climate warming in the mid- to high-latitudes and high-elevation mountainous regions is occurring more rapidly than anywhere else on Earth, causing extensive loss of glaciers and snowpack. The loss of glaciers in Glacier National Park (GNP) is iconic of the combined impacts of global warming and reduced snowpack−all remaining 25 glaciers are predicted to disappear by 2030. These changes will...

Date published: March 2, 2016

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO)

Monitors and studies the active geologic processes and hazards of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field and its caldera. Yellowstone National Park contains the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world. YVO also monitors volcanic activity in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, and New Mexico.

Date published: March 1, 2016

Radar Technology - A Tool for Understanding Migratory Aerofauna

Understanding the factors affecting migratory bird and bat populations during all three phases of their life cycle—breeding, non-breeding, and migration—is critical to species conservation planning. This includes the need for information about these species’ responses to natural challenges, as well as information about the impact of human activities that alter resources critical to migrants...

Date published: March 1, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of alternative dam operations on the movement and habitat use of bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout

The goal of this project is to quantify the operational impacts of Hungry Horse Dam on native bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout in the upper Flathead River system, Montana.

Date published: May 15, 2015
Status: Completed

Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative: Rocky Mountain Region

Decline of amphibian populations worldwide has prompted an international effort to determine causes of decline in various locations and ecosytems. Some causes which have been suggested include habitat alteration, introduced species, disease, and environmental stressors such as ultraviolet radiation, agricultural chemicals in groundwater, and contaminants in atmospheric deposition. The ...

Date published: September 30, 2007
Status: Completed

USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted an Abandoned Mine Lands (AML) Initiative during the fiscal years 1997 through 2001 to provide technical assistance in support of Federal Land Management Agency (FLMA) actions to remediate contamination associated with abandoned hard rock mining activities. This initiative was part of a larger strategy by the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U....

Date published: September 29, 2007
Status: Completed

The Plan | USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative

This is a section of the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initative (AMLI) site.

A Plan for the USGS Abandoned Mine Lands Initiative, 1997 - 2001

Prepared by: The USGS Initiative Implementation Team, and the Colorado and Montana Watershed Teams

Filter Total Items: 273
Bison herd grazing on a hill in Montana. Ryan Hagerty photo. FWS.
December 31, 2014

Bison Herd Grazing in Montana

Bison herd grazing on a hill in Montana. Ryan Hagerty photo. FWS.

An invasive American bullfrog with tracking device.
December 31, 2014

An invasive American bullfrog with tracking device.

An invasive American bullfrog with tracking device.  

Seining a heavily bullfrog populated side channel at Two Moon County Park in Billings, MT.
December 31, 2014

Capturing invasive American bullfrog tadpoles in the Yellowstone River floodplain.

Seining a heavily bullfrog populated side channel at Two Moon County Park in Billings, MT.

Looking out the mouth of Reynolds Glacier in Glacier National Park.
September 24, 2014

Looking out the mouth of Reynolds Glacier in Glacier National Park.

Looking out the mouth of Reynolds Glacier in Glacier National Park. Glacier National Park is iconic of the combined impacts of climate change and snow and ice loss – over 80 percent of the park’s glaciers have been lost since the mid-19th century.

Remnants of ice jam on Redwater River at Circle (06177500)
March 14, 2014

Remnants of ice jam on Redwater River at Circle (06177500)

Remnants of ice jam on Redwater River at Circle (06177500)

Ice jam, Redwater River near Vida (06177825)
March 14, 2014

Ice jam, Redwater River near Vida (06177825)

Ice jam, Redwater River near Vida (06177825)

Image of Blake Hossack
December 31, 2013

Image of Blake Hossack

USGS scientist Blake Hossack demonstrates swabbing the skin of a boreal toad to detect the amphibian chytrid fungus, to the Conservation Ecology class from the University of Montana.

East Poplar Study Area map
December 31, 2013

East Poplar Study Area map

East Poplar Study Area map

Glacial fed alpine stream in Glacier National Park.
August 8, 2013

Glacial fed alpine stream in Glacier National Park.

Scientists sample for alpine insects in streams like this near Blackfoot Glacier in Glacier National Park. Alpine streams environments in the northern Rocky Mountains are especially vulnerable to climate change due to rapid warming resulting in loss of glaciers and snowpack. Glacier National Park is iconic of the combined impacts of climate change and snow and ice loss –

...
A glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier) on a snowy backdrop in Glacier National Park.
July 24, 2013

Western glacier stonefly on a snowy backdrop in Glacier National Park

A glacier stonefly (Zapada glacier) on a snowy backdrop in Glacier National Park. The species is threatened by climate warming induced glacier and snow loss and has been petitioned for protection under the U.S. Endangered Species Act due to climate-change-induced habitat loss.

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK)

Scientists from the Center work in the northern Rocky Mountains and across the U.S. Many work throughout the world on issues as diverse as global climate change, aquatic ecology, wildlife diseases, bison ecology, and large carnivores.

Go to NOROCK

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

Wyoming-Montana Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's hydrologists, engineers, geospatial analysts, hydrologic technicians, geologists, and support staff work to provide hydrologic data and interpretive studies.

Go to Center