Unified Interior Regions

New Hampshire

New Hampshire is in the temperate broadleaf and mixed forests biome and is the state with the highest percentage of timberland area in the country. Much of the state, in particular the White Mountains, is covered by the conifers and northern hardwoods of the New England-Acadian forests. New Hampshire also has the shortest ocean coastline of any state in the United States, approximately18 miles.

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

361 Commerce Way
Pembroke, NH 03275-3718

Phone: (603) 226-7800
Fax: (603) 226-7894

New England Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 80
USGS
April 25, 2007

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) today issued preliminary estimates of the magnitudes of floods experienced throughout New Hampshire from April 16 through April 18. The highest ever flows recorded by the USGS occurred at 5 rivers in southern New Hampshire.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 25, 2006

Many private ground-water wells in New Hampshire and Maine may have arsenic at concentrations close to or above Federal safety standards for public water supplies. A recently released study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows the likely locations of elevated arsenic.

USGS
May 25, 2006

Many private ground-water wells in New Hampshire and Maine may have arsenic at concentrations close to or above Federal safety standards for public water supplies. A recently released study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) shows the likely locations of elevated arsenic.

USGS
May 22, 2006

Note to Editors: Return intervals are used by hydrologists to describe the magnitude and frequency of floods and represent the average interval of time over which floods of similar magnitudes are expected to occur. Digital images of these photographs are available on the Web site http://nh.water.usgs.gov

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 22, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) today issued preliminary estimates of the magnitudes of floods experienced throughout New Hampshire from May 13 through May 17. The highest ever flows recorded by the USGS occurred at 12 rivers in central and southern New Hampshire.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 7, 2005

As the spectacular New England fall foliage gives way to another of the region's infamous winters, many wonder what this year will bring. Long-time residents think winter just isn't what it used to be in New England.

USGS
November 7, 2005

As the spectacular New England fall foliage gives way to another of the region's infamous winters, many wonder what this year will bring. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
October 2, 2003

A recently released study led by the U.S. Geological Survey shows that an estimated 41,000 people in three southeast New Hampshire counties are using private wells that contain arsenic in concentrations that exceed federal safety standards for public water supplies. Officials made the announcement at a press conference today in Pembroke.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 23, 2003

 

New England’s historic long, harsh winters are often the stuff of legends from long-time residents who swear the weather was worse when they were young. It turns out they may well be right. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) have found evidence in the region’s rivers that lends credence to the notion that the winters were once longer.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 23, 2003

Modern wastewater treatment, environmental protection laws, road de-icing salts, and the shift from an agricultural to an urban-based society have resulted in significant changes during the past hundred years in the water quality of three major rivers in New England, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey. 

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

New England Water Science Center - New Hampshire/Vermont

361 Commerce Way
Pembroke, NH 03275-3718

Phone: (603) 226-7800
Fax: (603) 226-7894

New England Water