Unified Interior Regions

Tennessee

We conduct impartial, multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring on a large range of natural-resource issues that impact the quality of life of citizens and landscapes of the Southeastern United States and the Caribbean region.

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 80
USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS
April 26, 2004

Farmlands, wetlands, forests and deserts that composed the American landscape in the early 20th century have frequently been transformed during the past 30 years into mushrooming metropolitan areas as urbanization spreads across the country.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 1, 2004

A new map from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Central United States Earthquake Consortium shows that Central States, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana are among the most seismically active states east of the Rocky Mountains. More than 800 earthquakes are cataloged on the map that depicts the locations of earthquakes large enough to be felt, since 1699.

USGS
April 1, 2004

A new map from the U.S. Geological Survey and the Central United States Earthquake Consortium shows that Central States, including Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky and Indiana are among the most seismically active states east of the Rocky Mountains. More than 800 earthquakes are cataloged on the map that depicts the locations of earthquakes large enough to be felt, since 1699.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 10, 2003

The USGS has just completed a geologically based assessment of the technically recoverable, undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. This area includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama.

USGS
April 10, 2003

The USGS has just completed a geologically based assessment of the technically recoverable, undiscovered oil and gas resources of the Appalachian Basin Province. This area includes parts of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 13, 2003

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis have updated their expectations for earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 29, 2002

October marks a new milestone in the installation of modern seismic stations in seismically active urban areas across the country. These cities include Memphis, San Francisco, Seattle, Salt Lake City, Anchorage, and Reno.

USGS
October 29, 2002

October marks a new milestone in the installation of modern seismic stations in seismically active urban areas across the country. These cities include Memphis, San Francisco, Seattle, Salt Lake City, Anchorage, and Reno.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 25, 2002

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at The University of Memphis will create two artificial earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone to learn how the thick layers of sand and clay sediments react to seismic waves.

USGS
October 25, 2002

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at The University of Memphis will create two artificial earthquakes in the New Madrid Seismic Zone to learn how the thick layers of sand and clay sediments react to seismic waves.