Unified Interior Regions

Virginia

Virginia has a total area of 42,774.2 square miles, including 3,180.13 square miles of water, making it the 35th-largest state by area. The Chesapeake Bay separates the contiguous portion of the Commonwealth from the two-county peninsula of its Eastern Shore. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay.

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

1730 East Parham Road
Richmond, VA 23228

Phone: (804) 261-2600
Fax: (804) 261-2657

VA WV Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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USGS
October 2, 1998

Managerial and supervisory responsibilities, attitudes, awareness, and accessible technologies that enable people with disabilities to succeed in the workplace are the focus of the "Leadership, Enrichment, And (Dis)abilities [LEAD]" conference being held October 21-22, 1998 in Reston, Va.

USGS
October 1, 1998

Streamflow in the Potomac River near Washington, D.C., was below average during September, but in the just-completed 1998 water year (WY98) year-long streamflow was the second highest on record, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
September 30, 1998

Many of the fish lesions in Chesapeake Bay may be caused by a fungal infection rather than Pfiesteria, a U.S. Geological Survey scientist reported recently at the International Symposium on Aquatic Animal Health Conference in Baltimore

USGS
September 3, 1998

The steady precipitation over the Potomac drainage basin for the first several months of 1998 has resulted in a record-high flow of about 90 billion gallons per day (bgd) for the year so far, about 8% higher than flow by this time in 1996, when Potomac River flow set a new all-time high record of about 83. bgd.

USGS
August 27, 1998

Four U.S. Geological Survey crews will be in the field on Maryland’s lower Eastern Shore to collect water-quality samples at 16 stream sites in the Pocomoke, Wicomico, Manokin, and Transquaking River basins.

USGS
August 3, 1998

The average daily freshwater inflow to the Chesapeake Bay in the first seven months of 1998 was about 100.5 billion gallons per day (bgd), according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey. This is 12% higher than 1996, the year of record, when average daily inflow between January and July was about 90 bgd, and about 157% higher than the average inflow rate. Records have been kept since 1951.

USGS
May 29, 1998

From high mountain peaks to lowland rivers, chances are if you flip over a rock or peek in the crevices of a damp log in the Great Smoky Mountains, you just might find a red-cheeked, pygmy, or black-belly salamander. A lucky visitor may even find the rare Junaluska salamander or hear the chorus of serenading American toads after a severe spring storm.

USGS
May 1, 1998

Streamflow in April into the Chesapeake Bay was about 115 billion gallons per day (bgd) and flow in the Potomac River was about 19 bgd, in the normal range for the first time in 1998. Hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey state that, while flows are still above average, they are well within normal expected limits.

USGS
April 20, 1998

Visit other worlds and learn more about the Earth! See part of a famous 4.5-billion-year-old meteorite and learn why scientists believe it fell to Earth from Mars and may contain evidence of past life on the Red Planet.

USGS
March 27, 1998

Attention runners! The USGS in Reston, Va., will resound with footsteps as the 1998 USGS Open House 5K Race and 2K Fun Run get underway, Saturday, April 25, at 8:30 a.m. The running events, which are sponsored by the Interior Department Recreation Association, will enliven the atmosphere of the USGS Open House, which occurs April 25-26.

USGS
March 3, 1998

February streamflow in the Potomac River at Washington, DC, and total flow into the Chesapeake Bay were the highest on record for February, according to the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS). 

USGS
February 4, 1998

Although the Potomac River continues to flow at well above normal levels, the immediate impact of the day’s steady rain on the flow of the Potomac near Washington, D.C. has been slight, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey.

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

1730 East Parham Road
Richmond, VA 23228

Phone: (804) 261-2600
Fax: (804) 261-2657

VA WV Water