Unified Interior Regions

Virginia

Virginia has a total area of 42,774.2 square miles, including 3,180.13 square miles of water, making it the 35th-largest state by area. The Chesapeake Bay separates the contiguous portion of the Commonwealth from the two-county peninsula of its Eastern Shore. The geography and climate of the Commonwealth are shaped by the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Chesapeake Bay.

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

1730 East Parham Road
Richmond, VA 23228

Phone: (804) 261-2600
Fax: (804) 261-2657

VA WV Water

States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 137
Date published: April 13, 2016

Geologic Hazards and Catastrophic Events

We study the distribution and hazard potential of coastal and submarine events such as earthquakes and submarine landslides and associated tsunami potential, hurricane induced coastal inundation, extreme storms, sea-level rise and oil and gas spills. We also model development to help evaluate and forecast coastal hazard probability and occurrence.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Ocean Resources for America's Needs

Our scientists conduct research studies focused on geologic mapping, sampling and understanding of mineral and energy resources and studies of the geologic setting and processes to inform renewable energy development offshore.

Date published: April 13, 2016

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Science

We bring together multidisciplinary expertise focused on developing tools and models to improve understanding of how healthy ecosystems function as well as how they respond to environmental changes and human impacts including ecosystem restoration. Research studies address coral reef, coastal wetland, benthic habitat and groundwater resources.

Date published: April 12, 2016
Status: Active

USGS Library

The USGS Library, managed by CSAS&L, supports all fundamental scientific research conducted within USGS. It serves both internal and external customers with comprehensive access to literature, data, and information necessary understand USGS mission areas and make critical decisions about how to proceed with research initiatives and investigations in the earth and natural sciences.

Date published: March 8, 2016

Hurricane Sandy

Over 160 of our scientists, technicians, and specialists responded to Hurricane Sandy by deploying field equipment and capturing information both before and after the storm. Our Sandy Science Plan identifies major research themes that will guide research to continue the support of the recovery activities.

Date published: September 30, 2015
Status: Active

James River Research Corridor: Mountains to Sea Innovative Water Quality Network

This successful partnership brings together Randolph-Macon College (RMC), Washington and Lee University (W&L), and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU), in partnership with the US Geological Survey (USGS) to foster growth in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) through summer student internship experience, awareness of USGS science in the class room, and increased...

Contacts: Jennifer L Rapp, Douglas L Moyer, Dr. Charles Gowan , Dr. Robert Humston, Dr. Paul Bukaveckas , Dr. Greg Garman
Date published: September 30, 2014
Status: Active

Estimating Peak Streamflow Per Square Mile in Virginia’s Urban Basins

Models are presented that describe Virginia urban area annual peak streamflow per square mile based on basin percent urban area and basin drainage area.

Contacts: Samuel H Austin
Date published: September 30, 2014
Status: Active

Shenandoah River Instream Flow Studies

As urban and rural growth continues, competition for clean water expands into stream areas previously capable of meeting local water-use demands. Conflicts among instream and offstream users of streamflow increase as flows decrease. This research enhances understanding of summer low-flow conditions in the North Fork, South Fork, and Shenandoah Rivers, relating water availability to physical...

Contacts: Jennifer L Rapp
Date published: September 30, 2014
Status: Active

Low-Flow Characteristics of Virginia Streams

Understanding low flows in Virginia streams is essential to sound management of our water resources and associated riparian and watershed ecosystems. Meaningful characterizations of the magnitude, frequency, and duration of low flows provide valuable insights into the dynamics, variability, and flux associated with water movement through these unique stream systems. Improved estimates of low...

Date published: September 30, 2014
Status: Active

Virginia Flood Investigations

An important part of the Virginia Department of Transportation's missions is the safe maintenance, design, and constructions of bridges that cross-waterways and wetlands in the State. The data collected by USGS in conjunction with this project is a vital element of the overall task and mission of the Virginia Department of Transportation.

Date published: September 30, 2014
Status: Active

Peak-Flow Characteristics of Virginia Streams

Economic growth, and the development, management, and protection of Virginia’s natural resources require anticipating peak stream flows and changes in peak stream flows over time. Extensive hydraulic analysis and smart design are needed to limit the environmental impacts of buildings, pavements, highways, and bridges. Effective design and placement of structures built near streams and on flood...

Contacts: Samuel H Austin
Date published: January 16, 2013
Status: Completed

EPA, USGS, with USFWS Release New Report on the Extent and Severity of Toxic Contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay and its Watershed

Report summarizing existing information on the extent and severity of the occurrence of toxic contaminants in the Chesapeake Bay and its watershed.

Contacts: Scott Phillips
Filter Total Items: 194
USGS ecologist Jaimie Gillespie measuring a Sediment Elevation Table (SET) on the Pamunkey River, VA
May 23, 2016

USGS ecologist Jaimie Gillespie measuring a Sediment Elevation Table

USGS ecologist Jaimie Gillespie measuring a Sediment Elevation Table (SET) on the Pamunkey River, VA. This SET is part of a larger project which consists of two SETs at each of five research sites, on both the Mattaponi and Pamunkey Rivers spanning Oligahaline to non-tidal conditions. USGS scientists monitor these

...
Sampling for Impacts of UOG Waists
May 6, 2016

Sampling for Impacts of UOG Waists

Sampling for Impacts of UOG Wastes
USGS scientist collecting water-quality samples on a wastewater disposal facility in West Virginia to assess potential environmental impacts due to activities at the site.

Attribution: Water Resources
A Russian corer set lays laid out on the floor
April 20, 2016

Pollen Lab Field Gear

This gear, known as a Russian corer, is commonly used to extract sediment cores from field sites. 

A lab technician sieves a sample in the pollen lab
April 19, 2016

Sieving a Sample to Extract Pollen, Pollen Laboratory

In this photo, a lab technician sieves a sample to get rid of fine minerals (such as clay).

A lab technician pipets out the pollen from the heavier mineral material.
April 19, 2016

Swirling a Sample to Separate Pollen from Minerals, Pollen Laboratory

In a watch glass, a lab technician swirls out pollen from heavier mineral material and then pipets it out.

The sieving setup in the pollen lab
April 19, 2016

Set-up to Sieve Samples for Pollen, Pollen Laboratory

Seen in this image is the sieving setup of the pollen lab.

Image: Methane Seeps along Offshore Virginia
March 15, 2016

Methane Seeps along Offshore Virginia

Numerous distinct methane streams emanating from the seafloor at an upper slope (

Attribution: Energy and Minerals
The USGS Franklin pipe extensometer with a total depth of 860 feet.
March 1, 2016

The USGS Franklin pipe extensometer with a total depth of 860 feet.

The USGS Franklin pipe extensometer with a total depth of 860 feet.

Building housing the USGS Suffolk extensometer.
February 19, 2016

Building housing the USGS Suffolk extensometer

Building housing the USGS Suffolk extensometer.

The USGS Suffolk pipe extensometer with a total depth of 1,620 feet.
February 19, 2016

The USGS Suffolk pipe extensometer with a total depth of 1,620 feet.

The USGS Suffolk pipe extensometer with a total depth of 1,620 feet.

Building housing the USGS Franklin extensometer.
February 2, 2016

Building housing the USGS Franklin extensometer

Building housing the USGS Franklin extensometer.

Researchers Spears staff an “Earthquakes in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone” information booth
August 9, 2015

Earthquakes in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone Information Booth

USGS Research Geologists Mark Carter and Wright Horton (right to left) and Virginia State Geologist David Spears staff an “Earthquakes in the Central Virginia Seismic Zone” information booth at the dedication ceremony for the newly constructed Louisa County, Virginia High School on 9 August 2015.  The old high school building was damaged beyond repair during the 2011 M5.8

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Filter Total Items: 258
USGS
September 24, 2007

Many streams in Shenandoah National Park are vulnerable to acid rain. Steep slopes, small watersheds, and underlying geology, combined with acid rain make many streams inhospitable to native fish for extended periods of time, according to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS
September 4, 2007

Michael Gauldin has been selected as the public affairs officer for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). He will be responsible for media relations and helping to promote effective and strategic communications to support USGS science.

USGS
January 17, 2007

The discovery of a high incidence of intersex (male fish exhibiting female characteristics) in smallmouth bass of the Potomac River Basin has prompted an investigation of water quality and wastewater discharge into the upper Potomac, and blood-plasma studies on this fish species.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 20, 2006

Many chemicals were detected in ground water from selected areas of the Piedmont Aquifer System (PAS), but concentrations of those chemicals were below drinking-water standards in most cases, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). For example, none of the 47 pesticides or 59 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analyzed exceeded drinking-water standards.

USGS
December 20, 2006

Many chemicals were detected in ground water from selected areas of the Piedmont Aquifer System (PAS), but concentrations of those chemicals were below drinking-water standards in most cases, according to a report released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS
May 23, 2006

On May 23, 1956, a research center and observatory opened at Corbin, Va. to continuously monitor the Earth's magnetic field. It was charged by Congress "to enhance geomagnetic field studies and monitoring programs in support of scientific, general public, basic and national security needs of the United States."

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 23, 2006

 

On May 23, 1956, a research center and observatory opened at Corbin, Va. to continuously monitor the Earth's magnetic field. It was charged by Congress "to enhance geomagnetic field studies and monitoring programs in support of scientific, general public, basic and national security needs of the United States."

USGS
May 5, 2006

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Fish Health Research Laboratory and NOAA´s Cooperative Oxford Laboratory are cosponsoring a workshop on mycobacteriosis in Chesapeake Bay striped bass. This disease, also known as "fish-handlers disease," causes wasting and skin lesions in rockfish, a species that is important to recreational and commercial fishers and the economy of the Chesapeake Bay.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 7, 2006

Despite recent rain, water levels in streams throughout the Mid-Atlantic and surrounding regions remain near record lows for this time of year, according to hydrologists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). 

USGS
March 14, 2006

Opportunity to look at the core samples and talk to the scientists informally to learn more about the significance of these samples. Dubbed a "sampling party," scientists will be on hand to discuss what they will study as they divvy up segments of core from the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 14, 2006

Ever wondered what a mile-long piece of the Earth's crust looks like? Last fall, a team of scientists drilled into one of the most amazing geologic structures known. This core tells the story of 35 million years ago, when a meteorite 1.5 miles wide, traveling at hypersonic speed, smashed into the Earth's crust and created the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 13, 2006

Following three months of around-the-clock work, the Chesapeake Bay Impact Crater Deep Drilling Project successfully completed its operations, extracting more than a mile long segment of rocks and sediments from the Earth. On Dec. 4, the drill bit reached a final depth of 5,795 ft (1.1 miles, 1.77 kilometers) within the structure of the crater.

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

Virginia - West Virginia Water Science Center

1730 East Parham Road
Richmond, VA 23228

Phone: (804) 261-2600
Fax: (804) 261-2657

VA WV Water