Unified Interior Regions

Washington

Washington's Puget Sound is a complex ecosystem directly adjacent to a robust metropolitan area that scientists from the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center study. Recent surveys have looked at juvenile surf smelt, a key link in the food web that are consumed by predators such as salmon, orca, and many marine birds. 

Western Fisheries Research Center

Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. 

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Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's mission is to collect, analyze and disseminate the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely manage water resources for the people of the United States and the State of Washington.

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States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 718
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Year Published: 2003

Global Snow-Cover Evolution from Twenty Years of Satellite Passive Microwave Data

Starting in 1979 with the SMMR (Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer) instrument onboard the satellite NIMBUS-7 and continuing since 1987 with the SSMI (Special Sensor Microwave Imager) instrument on board the DMSP (Defence Meteorological Satellite Program) series, more then twenty years of satellite passive microwave data are now available...

Mognard, N.M.; Kouraev, A.V.; Josberger, E.G.
Global Snow-Cover Evolution from Twenty Years of Satellite Passive Microwave Data; 2003; Conference Paper; International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium (IGARSS); Mognard, N. M.; Kouraev, A. V.; Josberger, E. G.

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Year Published: 2003

Historical changes in the Columbia River estuary based on sediment cores: feasibility studies

The importance of the Columbia River estuary to salmon, other fishes, migratory birds, and other species is fairly well established. Relatively little is known, however, about long-term, historic variations in biological processes and conditions within the estuary. For example, have conditions varied greatly with climatic regime shifts and how has...

Petersen, J.H.; Reisenbichler, R.; Gelfenbaum, G.R.; Peterson, C.; Baker, D.; Leavitt, P.R.; Simenstad, C.A.; Prahl, F.G.

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Year Published: 2003

Identification of a genetic marker that discriminates ocean-type and stream-type chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin

A marker based on randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), OT-38, was discovered that nonlethally discriminates between stream-type and ocean-type populations of chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Columbia River basin, including the threatened fall-run (ocean-type) and spring-run (stream-type) Snake River populations. This marker was...

Rasmussen, C.; Ostberg, C.O.; Clifton, D.R.; Holloway, J.L.; Rodriguez, R.J.
Identification of a genetic marker that discriminates ocean-type and stream-type chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin; 2003; Article; Journal; Transactions of the American Fisheries Society; Rasmussen, C.; Ostberg, C. O.; Clifton, D. R.; Holloway, J. L.; Rodriguez, R. J.

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Year Published: 2003

Identification of larval Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata), river lampreys (L. ayresi), and western brook lampreys (L. richardsoni) and thermal requirements of early life history stages of lampreys. Annual report 2002-2003

Two fundamental aspects of lamprey biology were examined to provide tools for population assessment and determination of critical habitat needs of Columbia River Basin (CRB) lampreys (the Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and the western brook lamprey, L. richardsoni). We evaluated the usefulness of current diagnostic characteristics for...

Meeuwig, M.H.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Reiche, R.A.

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Year Published: 2003

Impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon

Salmonid habitats in main-stem reaches of the Columbia and Snake rivers have changed dramatically during the past 60 years because of hydroelectric development and operation. Only about 13% and 58% of riverine habitats in the Columbia and Snake rivers, respectively, remain. Most riverine habitat is found in the upper Snake River; however, it is...

Dauble, D.D.; Hanrahan, T.P.; Geist, D.R.; Parsley, M.J.
Impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon; 2003; Article; Journal; North American Journal of Fisheries Management; Dauble, D. D.; Hanrahan, T. P.; Geist, D. R.; Parsley, M. J.

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Year Published: 2003

Lateral line pore diameters correlate with the development of gas bubble trauma signs in several Columbia River fishes

Gas bubble trauma (GBT) caused by gas supersaturation of river water continues to be a problem in the Columbia River Basin. A common indicator of GBT is the percent of the lateral line occluded with gas bubbles; however, this effect has never been examined in relation to lateral line morphology. The effects of 115, 125 and 130% total dissolved gas...

Morris, R.G.; Beeman, J.W.; VanderKooi, S.P.; Maule, A.G.
Lateral line pore diameters correlate with the development of gas bubble trauma signs in several Columbia River fishes; 2003; Article; Journal; Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology - A Molecular and Integrative Physiology; Morris, R. G.; Beeman, J. W.; VanderKooi, S. P.; Maule, A. G.

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Year Published: 2003

Mapping the spatial distribution and time evolution of snow water equivalent with passive microwave measurements

This paper presents an algorithm that estimates the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of snow water equivalent and snow depth based on passive remote sensing measurements. It combines the inversion of passive microwave remote sensing measurements via dense media radiative transfer modeling results with snow accumulation and melt model...

Guo, J.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E.G.; Wood, A.W.; Hwang, J.-N.; Lettenmaier, D.P.
Mapping the spatial distribution and time evolution of snow water equivalent with passive microwave measurements; 2003; Article; Journal; IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing; Guo, J.; Tsang, L.; Josberger, E. G.; Wood, A. W.; Hwang, J. -N.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

Filter Total Items: 874
August 13, 2013

C2 West Transect – 2013

Permanent Site: C2 West Transect; Depth: 16.8 Meters (Feet 55.1); Distance from river mouth: 0.7 Kilometers (0.5 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 2 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.147841,-123.57663268; Site Description: One of our deepest sites. Substrate is all muddy sand. Seaweed is absent. Featherduster tubeworms, mainly Eudistylia vancouveri (1:13, 1:29, 1:40 seconds

August 12, 2013

A1 East Transect – 2013

Permanent Site: A1 East Transect; Depth: 7.9 Meters (25.9 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.8 Kilometers (1.1 Miles) West; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 2 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13870775, -123.5855312; Site Description: Transect is in eastern part of Freshwater Bay. Sediment is primarily sand/sandy mud with an occasional boulder. Seaweeds are very sparse this year

August 12, 2013

F1 East Transect – 2013

Permanent Site: F1 East Transect; Depth: 6.3 Meters (20.7 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.3 Kilometers (0.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 2 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15292999, -123.55011402; Site Description: This is a shallow site with gravel/cobble substrate. Woody debris is present (0:16, 0:38 seconds). Algae is gone except for the dead stalks of the

August 12, 2013

A1 West Transect – 2013

Permanent Site: A1 West Transect; Depth: 8.5 Meters (28.0 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.9 Kilometers (1.2 Miles) West; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 2 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13870775, -123.586203; Site Description: Transect is in eastern part of Freshwater Bay. Sediment is primarily sand/sandy mud with patches of boulders. Seaweeds are absent this year. Feather

August 12, 2013

F1 West Transect – 2013

Permanent Site: F1 West Transect; Depth: 6.5 Meters (21.2 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.3 Kilometers (0.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 2 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15292999, -123.55078602; Site Description: This is a shallow site with gravel/cobble substrate and an occasional boulder. Woody debris is present (0:14, 0:24seconds). Algae is gone except

SWFL seismic station, on the crater rim of Mount St. Helens, was re...
August 7, 2013

SWFL seismic station, on the crater rim of Mount St. Helens, was re...

This summer, crews made significant modifications to a monitoring station on the southwest flank of Mount St. Helens, greatly improving its operability in winter. Volcano monitoring stations are designed to integrate many instruments into a single package to lower power requirements, reduce instrument footprint on sensitive landscapes, be portable for rapid deployment and

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Annual surveys of water channels in the crater of Mount St. Helens ...
August 7, 2013

Annual surveys of water channels in the crater of Mount St. Helens ...

Crews survey Loowit Creek channel and other points inside the crater. Elevation information is used to make a longitudinal profile of the channel, characterizing areas where sediment is either deposited or transported and how the channel is changing with time. View to the north, with Spirit Lake and Mount Rainier in the background.

Taking the pulse of Mount St. Helens Volcano, Washington....
August 6, 2013

Taking the pulse of Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA.

Monitoring and upgrading ground-based sensor networks at the most active volcano in the Cascades is an on-going process. Crews made significant modifications to a seismic monitoring station on the southwest flank of Mount St. Helens, greatly improving its operability in winter.

Helicopter gives SWFL "swing set" a lift, Mount St. Helens....
August 6, 2013

Helicopter gives SWFL "swing set" a lift, Mount St. Helens.

Monitoring stations need to be portable. Weighing about 500 pounds, this "swing set" structure can be airlifted into place or moved, as volcano monitoring needs change. An additional 1,000 pounds of equipment will need to be added to make the station fully functional.

Touchdown at monitoring site in Mount St. Helens' crater....
August 6, 2013

Touchdown at monitoring site in Mount St. Helens' crater.

Crews access remote monitoring sites by helicopter. Pictured out the window of the helicopter is a GPS and camera station, dedicated to remotely monitoring changes inside the crater and under the crater floor.

Image shows a scientific instrument on the slopes of Mount St Helens
August 6, 2013

Precise Surveying of Mount St. Helens Crater with RTK-GPS Technology

A survey base station is established using a RTK-GPS receiver with mobile units to collect data points in and around the crater. Information will be used to monitor surface changes, deformation, erosion and aggradation inside the crater. This type of technology is precise to the centimeter. View is to the south of Mount St. Helens, toward Crater Glacier and the lava domes

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Precise surveying of Mount St. Helens crater with RTK-GPS technolog...
August 6, 2013

Precise surveying of Mount St. Helens crater with RTK-GPS technology.

A survey base station is established using a RTK-GPS receiver with mobile units to collect data points in and around the crater. Information will be used to monitor surface changes, deformation, erosion and aggradation inside the crater. This type of technology is precise to the centimeter. View to the south, toward Crater Glacier and the lava domes.

Filter Total Items: 377
USGS science for a changing world logo
April 18, 2001

The most common information available immediately following an earthquake is the location and magnitude. However, what scientists really want to know is where the shaking was felt, and in the case of emergency response, where it shook the most. Two new systems can now answer these questions within minutes following an earthquake. Both are available on the Internet.

USGS
April 18, 2001

In early February the program for this year’s annual meeting of the Seismological Society of America was finalized, with several papers and posters that addressed the potential for large earthquakes in the Puget Sound area of Washington.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 16, 2001

On the 95th anniversary of the great San Francisco earthquake, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will join their colleagues in the Seismological Society of America (SSA) to discuss new findings on the 1906 earthquake that devastated San Francisco; the Nisqually earthquake that lightly slapped the Seattle-Tacoma area six weeks ago; and several other large earthquakes.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 2, 2001

Advanced seismic monitoring, long term research, a commitment to hazard preparedness and mitigation and some good luck all played a role in ensuring that yesterday’s earthquake near Seattle was not more devastating.

USGS
March 2, 2001

Advanced seismic monitoring, long term research, a commitment to hazard preparedness and mitigation and some good luck all played a role in ensuring that yesterday’s earthquake near Seattle was not more devastating.

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 1, 2001

A minor aftershock struck the Seattle area early Thursday morning, March 1, 2001. The aftershock, which struck at 1:10 a.m. local time, had a preliminary magnitude of 3.4 and was felt throughout the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia area.

USGS
March 1, 2001

A minor aftershock struck the Seattle area early Thursday morning, March 1, 2001. The aftershock, which struck at 1:10 a.m. local time, had a preliminary magnitude of 3.4 and was felt throughout the Seattle-Tacoma-Olympia area.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 28, 2001

A strong earthquake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.8, struck near Olympia, Washington, south of Seattle, at 10:55 a.m. PST on February 28, 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.

USGS
February 28, 2001

A strong earthquake, with a preliminary magnitude of 6.8, struck near Olympia, Washington, south of Seattle, at 10:55 a.m. PST on February 28, 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey reported.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 17, 2001

Metal concentrations were found to be elevated in riverbed sediments and fish tissue samples at sites downstream from significant natural mineral sources associated with hard-rock mining activities in the Clark Fork and Spokane River basins, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior.

USGS
January 17, 2001

Metal concentrations were found to be elevated in riverbed sediments and fish tissue samples at sites downstream from significant natural mineral sources associated with hard-rock mining activities in the Clark Fork and Spokane River basins, according to scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Department of the Interior.

USGS
May 10, 2000

Twenty years ago this month, Mount St. Helens in southern Washington State was building up energy for the cataclysmic eruption that occurred on May 18, 1980.

Western Fisheries Research Center

Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. 

Go to Center

Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's mission is to collect, analyze and disseminate the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely manage water resources for the people of the United States and the State of Washington.

Go to Center