Unified Interior Regions

Washington

Washington's Puget Sound is a complex ecosystem directly adjacent to a robust metropolitan area that scientists from the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center study. Recent surveys have looked at juvenile surf smelt, a key link in the food web that are consumed by predators such as salmon, orca, and many marine birds. 

Western Fisheries Research Center

Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. 

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Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's mission is to collect, analyze and disseminate the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely manage water resources for the people of the United States and the State of Washington.

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States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 272
Date published: January 1, 2007
Status: Completed

Yakima River Temperature Model

In the Yakima and Naches Rivers, water temperature is often a limiting factor in the survival of salmon during spawning and rearing. The Bureau of Reclamation uses a computer model to assess the effects of reservoir-management scenarios on temperatures and the success of salmon restoration. To provide the daily maximum and long-term water temperature data needed by the model, the Bureau of...

Contacts: Mark Mastin
Date published: January 3, 2006
Status: Completed

Salmon Creek Basin

Two reservoirs in the Salmon Creek Basin in north-central Washington store runoff from the upper basin for out-of-basin irrigation of farmlands. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), developed a precipitation-runoff model that simulates historical daily unregulated streamflows for different locations in the Salmon Creek Basin. The model...

Date published: January 2, 2006
Status: Completed

Nitrate in GW, Lower Umatilla Basin, OR

Stretching from Pendleton, Oreg., to the Columbia River, the Lower Umatilla Basin covers 550 square miles. Concentrations of nitrate in the basin's ground water frequently exceed national drinking-water standards. The basin's complex ground-water system is exposed to five human-related sources of nitrate: septic tanks, feedlots, explosives, fertilizer, and land applications of food waste....

Date published: January 1, 2006
Status: Completed

Fort Lewis

Fort Lewis is a 135-square-mile U.S. Army post in Pierce County, Washington, located just south of Tacoma. The Environmental and Natural Resources Division of Fort Lewis wishes to evaluate the effectiveness of the current and potential remediation activities at the Logistics Center, a regional maintenance facility at Fort Lewis where pump-and-treat systems are being used to remediate...

Date published: January 3, 2005
Status: Completed

Elwha River

The formerly free-flowing Elwha River was famous for the diversity and size of its salmon runs. After the construction of the Elwha Dam (1912) and the Glines Canyon Dam (1927), fish lost access to more than 70 miles of mainstem river and tributary habitat. As a result, all 10 runs of native Elwha salmon and sea-going trout declined sharply. Restoration of the Elwha River ecosystem will be...

Date published: January 2, 2005
Status: Completed

Nooksack River Ground-Water Bacteria

The lower Nooksack River Basin is located in Whatcom County, in the northwestern part of Washington. Within areas of the basin, the ground-water aquifer is shallow. Knowledge of how the surface water and the aquifer interact, and how this interaction affects the transport of bacteria and nitrates from agricultural fields to the ground-water system, is important to residents of the basin. This...

Date published: January 2, 2005
Status: Completed

Multispectral imaging, Puyallup River

In the past, levees have been built along the river banks of the Puyallup River to prevent floodwater from damaging roads, buildings, farms, and other areas in the floodplain. Because levees can worsen flooding by creating backwater effects or reducing floodplain storage, Pierce County is planning to remove current levees and build new ones further away from the river channels.

To help...

Contacts: Robert W Black
Date published: January 1, 2005
Status: Completed

PNW Tribal Water Resources Assessment

Native American Tribes in western Washington need comprehensive water data in order to protect, restore, and manage their water resources. To understand the factors affecting water quality and quantity on a regional scale, the data must be collected and managed through a systematic, coordinated approach.

To help the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (NWIFC) to design a coordinated...

Date published: January 13, 2004
Status: Completed

Colville River Basin

The Colville River Basin is a 1,007-square-mile area located in Stevens County in northeastern Washington. Following the guidelines of Washington's Watershed Management Act of 1998, water-resource planning in the basin is being conducted within a Water Resources Inventory Area (WRIA).

Local citizens representing a wide range of water resource interest groups, together with local, state...

Contacts: Sue Kahle
Date published: January 12, 2004
Status: Completed

Water Resources of the Tulalip Indian Reservation

Future increases in population and development of the Tulalip Indian Reservation and neighboring areas would lead to increased pumping of ground water both on and off the Reservation. Increased pumpage in coastal and inland wells may decrease baseflows of streams and could affect fish-rearing operations in the Tulalip Creek watershed.

Contacts: Lonna M Frans
Date published: January 11, 2004
Status: Completed

Puyallup Streamflow Trends

Covering about 28 square miles along the lower reaches of the Puyallup River in Pierce County, the Puyallup Indian Reservation is located in the lowest part of the basin. For this reason, all water-related activities in the basin affect the Puyallup Tribe of Indians' water resources and fish.

Because of their important links to the Puyallup River, the Puyallup Tribe of Indians want to...

Contacts: Mark Mastin
Date published: January 10, 2004
Status: Completed

Satus Creek

After irrigating croplands, water returned to creeks and rivers in the Yakima River Basin can contribute compounds and materials that affect the quality of habitat. On lands of the Yakama Nation, Satus Creek receives water from the North Drain that brings with it sediment, nutrients, bacteria, and pesticides, degrading the aquatic habitat and posing a barrier for endangered fish in the creek...

Filter Total Items: 869
August 6, 2015

GP1 West Transect – 2015

Permanent Control Site: GP1 West Transect; Depth: 8.0 Meters (26.1 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 19.0 Kilometers (11.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.11852521,-123.31605203; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Depth is medium-shallow. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand/cobble mixture surrounding

August 6, 2015

GP2 West Transect – 2016

Permanent Control Site: GP2 West Transect; Depth: 12.9 Meters (42.3 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 18.8 Kilometers (11.6 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.12781102,-123.31712832; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand/cobble mixture surrounding boulders. Red and brown

Juvenile wolf eel
August 6, 2015

Juvenile wolf eel

Juvenile wolf eel - Scuba divers from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Western Fisheries Research Center, Washington Sea Grant, EPA and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe collected data and images from a long-term study of the Elwha River dam removals and the resulting effects on the nearshore ecosystem.

Location: Strait of Juan de Fuca,

...
August 6, 2015

GP1 East Transect – 2015

Permanent Control Site: GP1 East Transect; Depth: 7.3 Meters (24 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 19.0 Kilometers (11.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.11852521,-123.31538047; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Depth is medium-shallow. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand/cobble mixture surrounding

August 5, 2015

D2 East Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: D2 East Transect; Depth: 12.1 Meters (39.8 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56829403; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river. Substrate is mainly gravel. This year lots of dead clam shells (0:40, 1:03 seconds) are scattered along

Moon snails
August 5, 2015

Moon snails

Moon snails - Scuba divers from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Western Fisheries Research Center, Washington Sea Grant, EPA and the Lower Elwha Klallam Tribe collected data and images from a long-term study of the Elwha River dam removals and the resulting effects on the nearshore ecosystem.

Location: USGS, Western Fisheries Research

...
August 5, 2015

D2 West Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: D2 West Transect; Depth: 12.7 Meters (41.7 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56896603; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river. Substrate is mainly gravel and cobble. This year lots of dead clam shells (0:18, 0:32 seconds) are

July 25, 2015

J1 East Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: J1 East Transect; Depth: 9.4 Meters (30.8 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 6.7 Kilometers (4.1 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13607725,-123.47935008; Site Description: This site is medium depth. Substrates is mainly a gravel/sand mixture. Seaweed density has increased. Seven species of brown seaweed were recorded

July 25, 2015

J1 West Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: J1 West Transect; Depth: 9.2 Meters (30.2 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 6.6 Kilometers (4.1 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13607725,-123.48002186; Site Description: Visibility was bad on this date and video is of poor quality. This site is medium depth. Substrates is mainly a gravel/sand mixture with some

July 24, 2015

H2 East Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: H2 East Transect; Depth: 8.1 Meters (26.7 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 2.6 Kilometers (1.6 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15008216,-123.53210661; Site Description: This site is medium to shallow depth. Substrate is mainly gravel with some sand, cobble and an occasional boulder and has not changed since dam

July 24, 2015

4SP1 East Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: 4SP1 - East Transect; Depth: 5.5 Meters (17.9 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.8 Kilometers (0.5 Miles) East; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15257, -123.556704; Site Description: The site has converted from gravel/cobble substrate to all sand. Seaweed is completely absent. 
 

July 24, 2015

F1 West Transect – 2015

Permanent Site: F1 West Transect; Depth: 6.6 Meters (21.7 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.3 Kilometers (0.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 4 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15292999, -123.55078602; Site Description: The video is of poor quality. This is a shallow site. Substrate is still mainly sand with an occasional cobble. Woody debris is present (0:39 

Filter Total Items: 384
USGS science for a changing world logo
August 11, 2011

Science papers, posters, and other types of information used to inform and update Klamath Basin public and private sector stakeholders at the 2010 Klamath Basic Science Conference have been published by the USGS in an Open File Report that is now available online.

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 4, 2011

Scuba divers from the USGS and the Environmental Protection Agency are exploring and cataloging marine life at the mouth of Washington’s Elwha River. The underwater survey is taking place downstream of the Elwha and Glines Canyon Dams, which are being removed over the next three years starting this September. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 22, 2011

For the fourth year in a row, the USGS is working side by side with Coast Salish tribal peoples, monitoring the ecosystem health of the Salish Sea during their annual Tribal Canoe Journey. The USGS and Coast Salish canoe families are deploying YSI® scientific instruments called, "sondes" on 5 of the more than 100 canoes participating in the Journey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 14, 2011

Restoration of the Elwha River, including the start of the Nation’s largest dam removal to date, is the backdrop for the Elwha River Science Symposium, to be held at Peninsula College in Port Angeles, Wash., this September 15-16, 2011.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 12, 2011

Knowing that the U.S. west coast was battered during the winter before last by a climatic pattern expected more often in the future, scientists have now pieced together a San Diego-to-Seattle assessment of the damage wrought by that winter's extreme waves and higher-than-usual water levels. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 1, 2011

A newly developed computer model simulates how groundwater flows in the Chambers-Clover Creek aquifer system and contributes to an improved understanding of water resources in the Chambers-Clover Creek Watershed, according to a report published by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 1, 2011

An invasive species of aquatic snail that is difficult to control and can take over habitats of native species has been detected in a stream that flows into Lake Washington, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 18, 2011

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Cascades Volcano Observatory rediscovered an old cache of satellite images captured on May 18-19, 1980, and linked them together to create a time-lapse movie of Mount St. Helens' eruptive ash cloud movement across the western United States.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 16, 2011

May is Volcano Awareness Month in Washington state. As proclaimed by Gov. Chris Gregoire, scientists, safety officials and educators are encouraged to discuss the hazards of volcanoes with their communities. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 16, 2011

Marine biologists are gathering in Alaska this week to kick off a three-week expedition studying sea otters, as part of a joint U.S.-Canadian project to investigate the ecological health of the Pacific coastline.

The "Pacific Nearshore Project" is a multinational, multiagency project investigating sea otters as health indicators of coastal waters and marine resources from California nort

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 11, 2011

Over sixty U.S. Geological Survey scientists will present research results used by decision makers in the Pacific Northwest and the rest of the world at the Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting, April 12-16 in Seattle, Wash. USGS scientists use remote sensing, terrestrial lidar, and analysis of land-cover and land-use change to better understand the global impacts of climate change,

USGS science for a changing world logo
March 4, 2011

A new carbon model allows scientists to estimate sources and losses of organic carbon in surface waters in the United States. Study results indicate that streams act as both sources and sinks for organic carbon. 

Western Fisheries Research Center

Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. 

Go to Center

Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's mission is to collect, analyze and disseminate the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely manage water resources for the people of the United States and the State of Washington.

Go to Center