Unified Interior Regions

Washington

Washington's Puget Sound is a complex ecosystem directly adjacent to a robust metropolitan area that scientists from the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center study. Recent surveys have looked at juvenile surf smelt, a key link in the food web that are consumed by predators such as salmon, orca, and many marine birds. 

Western Fisheries Research Center

Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. 

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Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's mission is to collect, analyze and disseminate the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely manage water resources for the people of the United States and the State of Washington.

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States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 272
Date published: January 5, 2001
Status: Completed

Water Resources Inventory Area 1 Watershed Management

In recent years, increased use of ground- and surface-water supplies in watersheds of Washington State has created concern that insufficient in-stream flows remain for fish and other users. In response, the Washington State legislature passed the Watershed Management Act of 1998 (ESHB 2514; see also Ch.90.82 RCW - Watershed Planning), which encourages and provides some funding for local...

Date published: January 4, 2001
Status: Completed

Cedar River Watershed

The Cedar River watershed provides two-thirds of the water supply for the greater Seattle metropolitan region, in addition to being home to numerous terrestrial and aquatic organisms such as salmon, some of which are Federally listed as threatened species. The City of Seattle is establishing monitoring plans for the Cedar River watershed to effectively manage the resource. A critical component...

Contacts: Robert W Black
Date published: January 3, 2001
Status: Completed

Puget Sound-Willamette Trough

More than 70 percent of the population of Washington and Oregon resides in the Puget Sound-Willamette Trough, which stretches north-south on the western side of the Cascade Range. The area is one of the principal regional ground-water systems in the Nation, but little is known about the quantity and quality of the ground water, the regional flow system, or the interaction of the system with...

Date published: January 2, 2001
Status: Completed

Puyallup Flood Alert

The Puyallup River Basin lies mostly within Pierce County, Washington, and contains 972 square miles of land ranging in elevation from zero at its mouth in Puget Sound to 14,408 feet at the top of Mount Rainier. The cities of Tacoma, Puyallup, Sumner, and Orting are some of the population centers located in the basin.

To protect lives and property in the basin, Pierce County needs...

Contacts: Mark Mastin
Date published: January 1, 2001
Status: Completed

Highway Storm-Water Detention

In some areas of the state, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) sometimes directs the storm-water runoff from highways into detention basins that store the water until it infiltrates into the ground. Because most of the water eventually percolates to the water table, and because runoff from highways can contain contaminants, using roadside detention basins may degrade...

Contacts: Lonna M Frans
Date published: January 3, 2000
Status: Completed

Elwha-Morse Watershed

Have increased demands for Washington State's ground water and surface water left sufficient stream flows for fish and other uses?

To find out, the state's Watershed Management Act of 1998 (ESHB 2514) confers on local people the responsibility for conducting local watershed planning.

The Elwha-Morse Watershed area was formed out of the western part of Water Resources Inventory...

Date published: January 2, 2000
Status: Completed

Pierce County Groundwater

The rapid growth of population in the Tacoma-Puyallup area in Pierce County has placed increasing demands on the ground-water resource. Most domestic water needs are met by wells completed in the several hundred feet of glacial deposits that underlie the area, and about 9,000 persons are served by a single spring on the southwestern side of Puyallup. Most of the population relies on individual...

Date published: January 1, 2000
Status: Completed

Probability Flows for Streams in Eastern WA

Under Washington regulations, bridges, culverts, and other stream-crossing structures need to be designed with fish passage in mind. For culverts, maximum flows cannot exceed a 10-percent exceedance probability flow (the flow that is equalled or exceeded 10 percent of the time) when fish are migrating upstream.

To help the Washington Department of Natural Resources manage its culverts...

Filter Total Items: 869
Monitoring station inside the crater of Mount St. Helens "sniffs" v...
August 26, 2014

MultiGAS monitoring station inside crater of Mount St. Helens

The new volcanic-gas monitoring station installed at Mount St. Helens consists of weather monitoring equipment and sensors for measuring the concentrations of water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in volcanic gas plumes. Inside the fiberglass hut is the gas-monitoring equipment, a radio to send data back to the Cascades

...
Taking kidney samples from adult female Chinook salmon
August 24, 2014

Taking kidney samples from adult female Chinook salmon

Connie McKibben and Carla Conway (USGS) taking kidney samples from adult female Chinook salmon for detection and quantification of Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) in the fish, while Joy Evered observes.  Dr. Evered is a USFWS Veterinary Medical Officer and the USFWS Project Officer for this research project.

August 17, 2014

A2 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: A2 West Transect; Depth: 12.6 Meters (Feet 41.5); Distance from river mouth: Kilometers 1.8 (1.1 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.14130295, -123.5883331; Site Description: One of our deeper sites at over 40 feet. Sediment is primarily sand/sandy mud with scattered boulders. Seaweeds are absent except for a couple Agarum

Recording data for female spring Chinook salmon
August 17, 2014

Recording data for female spring Chinook salmon

Dr. Wendy Olson, USFWS biologist (orange rain pants) records data for female spring Chinook salmon being spawned at the hatchery. Among the data recorded are fin clips designating treatment groups for the research project (erythromycin treatment, tulathromycin treatment, or no treatment).

August 17, 2014

F2 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: F2 East Transect; Depth: 11.9 Meters (39.1 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.5 Kilometers (0.9 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15672004,-123.54969397; Site Description: Substrate is mainly a gravel - cobble mixture with an occasional boulder. Some seaweed has returned. Larger reds are present (0:33, 2:08 seconds)

August 17, 2014

A2 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: A2 East Transect; Depth: 12.6 Meters (Feet 41.5); Distance from river mouth: Kilometers 1.8 (1.1 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.14130295, -123.58766124; Site Description: One of our deeper sites at over 40 feet. Sediment is primarily sand/sandy mud. Seaweeds are absent again this year. The sandy substrate is covered in

August 17, 2014

F2 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: F2 West Transect; Depth: 11.8 Meters (38.6 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.5 Kilometers (0.9 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15672004,-123.55036603; Site Description: Substrate is mainly a gravel - cobble mixture with an occasional boulder. Some seaweed has returned. Larger reds are present (0:43, 0:59 seconds)

August 16, 2014

D2 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: D2 East Transect; Depth: 12.6 Meters (41.4 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56829403; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river. Substrate is mainly gravel with some sand and cobble. Woody debris is present (0:28 seconds). Seaweeds

August 16, 2014

D2 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: D2 West Transect; Depth: 12.3 Meters (40.5 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.3 Kilometers (0.2 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15233001,-123.56896603; Site Description: This site is right off the mouth of the river. Substrate is mainly gravel with some sand and cobble. Woody debris is present (1:07 seconds). Seaweeds

August 6, 2014

J1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: J1 East Transect; Depth: 9.1 Meters (30.0 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 6.7 Kilometers (4.1 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13607725,-123.47935008; Site Description: This site is medium depth. Substrates is mainly a gravel/sand mixture. Seaweed density is still greatly decreased. Three species of brown seaweed

August 4, 2014

E2 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: E2 East Transect; Depth: 14.8 Meters (48.5 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.9 Kilometers (0.5 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15653002,-123.56130401; Site Description: This is one of our deeper sites. Substrate is mainly gravel/cobble with an occasional boulder. Seaweed is absent. Featherduster tubes worms (

Filter Total Items: 384
USGS science for a changing world logo
May 12, 2009

Mark your calendars for the 2009 Tribal Journey Paddle to Suquamish Aug. 3-8. Access videos, photos and more from the 2008 journey.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 6, 2009

Governor Christine Gregoire has proclaimed May as Volcano Awareness Month in Washington State. Scientists, safety officials and educators are encouraged to discuss the hazards of volcanoes in their communities.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 26, 2009

Sea-level rise, severe winter storms, salmon populations, carbon sequestration, invasive plants, and migratory birds are among the many issues of concern to natural resource managers that are affected by changing climate. Climate change and its impact on coastal ecosystems is the focus of a 2-day workshop that will bring together more than 450 scientists and policy-makers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 22, 2009

The latest climate-change science and how it can be used by natural resource agencies is the focus of a two-day workshop January 29-30 in San Francisco.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 20, 2009

Fifteen fishers were released yesterday within the Skokomish, Hoh, and Queets valleys of Olympic National Park, bringing the total number of reintroduced animals to 47. Access limitations caused by recent snow and floods created logistical challenges for the people involved, but apparently not for the fishers as they bounded from their cages and ran into the forest.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 18, 2008

Dr. Julio Betancourt, a U.S. Geological Survey senior scientist, was recently awarded a prestigious 2008 Presidential Rank Award. Betancourt, who has conducted groundbreaking research in how climate variability affects ecosystems, is also an adjunct professor at the University of Arizona, where he received his graduate degrees.

 

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 17, 2008

Collaborative Project Enters Its Second Year as 15 More Animals Join Population Reintroduced Last Winter

At least 15 fishers will be released at remote sites within the Elwha, Sol Duc and Hoh valleys of Olympic National Park this weekend, adding to the fisher population that was reintroduced last winter and moving closer to the goal of establishing an initial population of 100 animals.

 

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 16, 2008

The Willamette, a large river associated with 70 percent of the population of Oregon, is getting cleaner in regard to some persistent toxic pollutants that are a legacy of past management practices. A 257-mile portion of the Columbia River between Umatilla, Oregon, and Skamokawa, Washington, is also showing a similar trend.

USGS
October 29, 2008

The Indian Ocean tsunami that claimed a quarter million lives was not the first nor last of its kind, according to reports in the October 30 issue of the scientific journal Nature.

Person placeholder
September 15, 2008

When the Elwha and Glines Canyon dams in Washington State are torn down in 2012, scientists will be able to see — as never before — how the removal of large dams affects the restoration of ecosystems, plants, fisheries and other animals.

USGS
July 10, 2008

VANCOUVER, WA-  Scientists say the nearly three and a half years of eruption at Mount St. Helens is over for now and have lowered the volcano alert level from Advisory to Normal and the aviation color code from Yellow to Green. 

USGS
July 2, 2008

The Coast Salish Nation and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will embark on a Canoe Journey to study and improve water resources in the Salish Sea, July 8-29.

Western Fisheries Research Center

Western Fisheries Research Center

Research at the WFRC focuses on the environmental factors responsible for the creation, maintenance, and regulation of fish populations including their interactions in aquatic communities and ecosystems. 

Go to Center

Washington Water Science Center

Washington Water Science Center

The Water Science Center's mission is to collect, analyze and disseminate the impartial hydrologic data and information needed to wisely manage water resources for the people of the United States and the State of Washington.

Go to Center