Unified Interior Regions

Wyoming

The Rocky Mountain Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Rocky Mountain Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

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Filter Total Items: 91
Date published: April 13, 2016
Status: Active

Yellowstone Lake Acoustic Biotelemetry Project Home Page

Fishery biologists and managers are increasingly consumed with the recovery and restoration of native trout and salmon throughout the western United States. These fish historically inhabited a variety of freshwater habitats, but have declined due to habitat degradation, fragmentation and introduction of nonnative species. Introduced fishes constitute a major threat to the persistence of native...

Contacts: Bob Gresswell
Date published: April 12, 2016
Status: Active

Developing stream temperature networks for the Greater Yellowstone to aid in managing aquatic resources under a changing climate

The topographic diversity and extensive area of protected public land within the Greater Yellowstone demonstrate the importance of this region as a natural resource reserve. Understanding the effects of anticipated changes in climate on aquatic resources and means for managing these resources will ultimately require accurate linkages between empirical data and regional climatic patterns. This...

Date published: April 12, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluating the linkages between regional climate patterns, local climate data, and native Yellowstone cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvieri) and non-native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) growth, survival, and life-history expressions.

Beyond large-scale climate models, it is becoming increasingly important to quantify how regional climate patterns link with in situ stream temperatures and hydrologic regimes and concomitantly, fish behavior, growth, and survival. Here, we are using comprehensive mark-recapture techniques to evaluate how changing climatic conditions are likely to influence native westslope cutthroat trout and...

Date published: April 9, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Elk on Department of Interior Lands in Southwest Wyoming

Between 2005 and 2010, we radio- collared 61 female elk (Cervus elaphus) on Fossil Butte National Monument and 12 female elk near Cokeville, Wyoming, slightly northwest of the Monument, all from the West Green River herd. We are using the 209,250 locations from these elk to identify seasonal distribution patterns, evaluate habitat use, and assess factors influencing the timing of migration.  ...

Date published: April 1, 2016

Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI)

The WLCI is a long-term science based effort to enhance aquatic and terrestrial habitats at a landscape scale in Southwest Wyoming, while facilitating responsible development.

Date published: March 18, 2016

Developing a mechanistic understanding between recent climate patterns and Aquatic Vital Signs in the Greater Yellowstone Network

The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program was established to provide park managers with a broad understanding of the status of park resources using the best available science. This program acknowledges that NPS managers are confronted with complex challenges associated with the management of dynamic landscapes responding to multiple, interacting drivers of change. To provide...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

An investigation of aquatic invasive species in pristine sites in the Greater Yellowstone Area

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are aquatic organisms that move into ecosystems beyond their natural, historic range and cause severe and irreversible damage to the habitats they invade. Most AIS arrive as a direct result of human activity, such as boating and angling. The threat of AIS introduction is especially high in the Greater Yellowstone Area, as humans from all over the world come to...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Date published: March 17, 2016

Volcano Hazards Assessments Help Mitigate Disasters

The Volcano Hazards Program develops long-range volcano hazards assessments. These includes a summary of the specific hazards, their impact areas, and a map showing ground-hazard zones. The assessments are also critical for planning long-term land-use and effective emergency-response measures, especially when a volcano begins to show signs of unrest.

Date published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Apex Sites

In contrast to RARMI study areas in Colorado that have 10 or more years of records of continuous population monitoring, there are fewer long-term datasets for amphibian populations in the northern Rocky Mountains. The exception is an ongoing study of Columbia spotted frogs at Lodge Creek, Yellowstone National Park. Three other long-term research and monitoring areas have been established in...

Contacts: Blake Hossack
Date published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Apex Sites

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as...

Date published: March 15, 2016
Status: Completed

COMPLETED: Using thermal imagery to assess wolf hairloss from sarcoptic mange

Researchers at NOROCK and their partners used thermal cameras at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana to assess the amount of heat lost under a range of environmental conditions with and without hair. These methods help scientists better understand how mange operates in wild wolves throughout the Greater...

Contacts: Paul Cross, Emily Almberg, Doug Smith, Adam Munn, Peter Hudson, John Heine, Dan Stahler, Shane Maloney
Date published: March 15, 2016

Impacts of climate change on habitat quality: plant phenology interactions with animal use and fitness

Weather and climate impact terrestrial wildlife habitat through their influences on plant productivity. Plant phenology – the timing of life-history events such as green-up, flowering and senescence – provides one indicator of the timing and magnitude of productivity. Changes and variability in plant phenology in space and time are indicators of habitat quality, which is a driver of fitness...

Filter Total Items: 75
Date published: January 1, 2016

Previous mineral-resource assessment data compilation for the U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment Project

This data release consists of a compilation of previously published mineral potential maps that were used for the Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project. This information was used as guides for assessing mineral potential assessment of approximately 10 million acres in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. Specifically, the compilation was used to identify the d

Date published: December 1, 2010

Oil Shale Data Downloads

This page accesses data for Oil Shale Assessments of PIceance, Uinta and Green River Basins.  It also includes fischer assays and scans of well logs in the Colorado Piceance Basin.   

Date published: June 11, 2010

Oil and Gas Well locations, Upper Colorado River Basin, 2007

This dataset was used as the basis for estimating land disturbance from oil and gas activity in the UCRB. The dataset is a compilation of five state oil and gas datasets from June of 2007. The intended uses of this data set include, but are not limited to, natural resource modeling, mapping, and visualization applications.

Filter Total Items: 256
Outside stream stage of Bull Lake Creek abv Bull Lake
December 13, 2017

Reading stream stage at Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake streamgage

The wire weight is lowered to determine stage of Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 09219200
November 29, 2017

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 0921920

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 09219200

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad
October 17, 2017

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River
October 6, 2017

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River

Pipetting for DNA analysis using loop-mediated isothermal amplification
September 14, 2017

Pipetting for DNA analysis - loop-mediated isothermal amplification

Pipetting for DNA analysis using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

Testing the feasibility of real-time eDNA monitoring
September 13, 2017

Testing the feasibility of real-time eDNA monitoring

Elk are not concerned with our work. USGS and the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute conducted tests of the feasibility of real-time eDNA monitoring at USGS streamgage 06190540 Boiling River at Mammoth,YNP, September 13, 2017.

Cleaning the trench
September 11, 2017

Teton Fault

Mark, Nicole, Rich, Ryan, Dean taking out the "trash" from the base of the trench.

September 7, 2017

Excavating the Teton Trench September 2017 - Day 2

USGS scientists Rich Briggs, Ryan Gold, Chris DuRoss, and Jaime Delano spent September 5-21, 2017 outside of Jackson, Wyoming doing fieldwork at a site to collect paleoseismology data on a segment of the Teton Fault. This video shows the second day of the site excavation inside the flagged the boundaries set up by the group.
 

September 6, 2017

Excavating the Teton Trench September 2017 - Day 1

USGS scientists Rich Briggs, Ryan Gold, Chris DuRoss, and Jaime Delano spent September 5-21, 2017 outside of Jackson, Wyoming doing fieldwork at a site to collect paleoseismology data on a segment of the Teton Fault. This video shows the first day of the site excavation inside the flagged the boundaries set up by the group.

Collecting sample for pesticide analyses, Big Horn River near Kane, WY
July 27, 2017

Collecting sample for pesticide analyses, Big Horn River near Kane, WY

Sample collection from cableway above Big Horn River near Kane, Wyoming as part of project evaluating pesticides in Wyoming.

Taking water-quality equipment to Fogarty Creek
July 7, 2017

Taking water-quality equipment to Fogarty Creek

Taking water-quality equipment to Fogarty Creek

July 5, 2017

Return of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear

Yellowstone grizzly bears inhabit federal, state, tribal, and private lands, and long-term research requires careful coordination across governmental levels. The Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) is an interdisciplinary group of scientists and biologists responsible for long-term monitoring and research efforts on grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone

Filter Total Items: 113
USGS
June 16, 2010

Continued high flows in the upper North Platte River and its tributaries have resulted in the river reaching an all-time record at the USGS streamgage on the North Platte River above Seminoe Reservoir near Sinclair. The gage height of 11.6 feet reached on June 14, 2010 is 2.6 feet above the National Weather Service flood stage.

USGS
June 10, 2010

Reporters: Want to accompany a U.S. Geological Survey field crew as they measure flooding? Please contact Kirk Miller to coordinate.

USGS
March 29, 2010

Brucellosis, a bacterial infection of cattle, elk and bison, appears to be increasing in several elk populations in northwestern Wyoming, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study recently released in the publication Ecological Applications.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 4, 2009

Greater sage-grouse populations have declined substantially in many areas in the West, though populations in some locations remain relatively stable, according to a comprehensive publication written by federal, state, and non-governmental organizations. The population assessment is one of numerous sage-grouse topics covered in the 24 chapters released today.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 21, 2009

Idaho Developed Mapping Method Garners Prestigious Award. Data from earth observing Landsat satellites plays a central role in a new, award-winning type of mapping that tracks water use. Water-use maps help save taxpayer money by increasing the accuracy and effectiveness of public decisions involving water – for instance, in monitoring compliance with legal water rights. The maps are especially

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 28, 2009

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research hydrologist Dr. Yousif Kharaka will present a talk in Cheyenne, Wyo. about the feasibility and implications of capturing and storing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide underground in depleted oil fields and deep rock formations with salty aquifers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 16, 2009

Water produced by the High Plains aquifer, which provides water to eight states, is generally acceptable for human consumption, irrigation, and livestock watering, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study highlighted at the summer meeting of the Western States Water Council in Park City, Utah.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 15, 2009

Tracking Native Mussels on the Mississippi River
For the first time ever, mussels in the Mississippi River will be radio tagged and their movements observed during the water-level drawdown that is scheduled to begin next week.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 28, 2009

New U.S. Geological Survey research indicates that ammonia from water used in the production of natural gas from underground coal beds in Wyoming is entering the Powder River.
"High concentrations of ammonia are toxic, particularly at some of the higher pH values found in these discharged waters," said USGS scientist Richard Smith.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 2, 2009

Striking new glacier retreat photographs created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) visually illustrate the effects of climate change on Glacier National Park.
The glacier images reveal dramatic glacial decline over a century and are in line with predictions that all of the glaciers in Glacier National Park will disappear by 2030.

USGS
June 17, 2008

Long-term trends in landscape conditions have significantly reduced sagebrush habitat and populations of greater sage-grouse, according to a new study examining the bird's chances of survival.