Unified Interior Regions

Wyoming

The Rocky Mountain Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Rocky Mountain Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

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States L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 98
Date published: November 15, 2001
Status: Archived

SAGEMAP

A GIS Database for Sage-grouse and Shrubsteppe Management in the Intermountain West

Contacts: Steven E Hanser
Date published: June 19, 2000
Status: Completed

NAWQA South Platte River Basin Study

The South Platte River Basin study, conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program, combines information on water chemistry, physical characteristics, stream habitat, and aquatic life to provide science-based insights for current and...

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USGS employees in cableway moving ADCP
June 27, 2018

ADCP Cableway Measurement

An exciting ride to get the ADCP to the main channel on the other side of the willows for streamflow measurement at the Shoshone River near Lovell, Wyoming.

two USGS employees using the crane on a bridge
June 25, 2018

Collecting Water-Quality Sample Using Bridge Crane, Bighorn River

Summer Interns learning about sampling at the Bighorn River near Worland, Wyoming. The team used the bridge crane and heavy sampler to get water while streamflow was about twice average for the date.

ADCP measurment from bridge looking downstream
June 19, 2018

ADCP Bridge Measurement

USGS employees measuring WInd River streamflows at Kinnear bridge soon after minor flooding had occurred on the highway.

Measuring streamflow in Belle Fource River below Hulett, WY
June 8, 2018

Measuring streamflow in Belle Fource River below Hulett, WY

Measuring streamflow in Belle Fource River below Hulett, WY

cableway view of dam and mountains upstream
June 4, 2018

Cableway Scenery

Using the cableway to measure streamflow in Snake River below the Jackson Lake Dam. With scenery like that, it's hard to keep your eye on the equipment in the water!

moving the ADCP back and forth across the river
May 9, 2018

Winter ADCP Measurement

Using teamwork to move the ADCP back and forth across Blackrock Creek at Togwotee Pass. 

Processing a sample for detection of N. fowleri
March 21, 2018

Processing a sample for detection of N. fowleri

Processing a sample for detection of N. fowleri

Equipment used to process a water sample to be analyzed for Naegleria fowleri
March 21, 2018

Equipment used to process a sample analyzed for Naegleria fowleri

Equipment used to process a water sample to be analyzed for Naegleria fowleri

Processing sample from Granite Hot Springs
March 20, 2018

Processing sample from Granite Hot Springs

Processing sample from Granite Hot Springs

Filter Total Items: 138
USGS
September 1, 2010

LARAMIE, Wy. — Previous research has claimed that the reintroduction of wolves to Yellowstone National Park in 1995 is helping restore quaking aspen in risky areas where wolves prowl. But apparently elk hungry for winter food had a different idea.

USGS
June 16, 2010

Continued high flows in the upper North Platte River and its tributaries have resulted in the river reaching an all-time record at the USGS streamgage on the North Platte River above Seminoe Reservoir near Sinclair. The gage height of 11.6 feet reached on June 14, 2010 is 2.6 feet above the National Weather Service flood stage.

USGS
June 10, 2010

Reporters: Want to accompany a U.S. Geological Survey field crew as they measure flooding? Please contact Kirk Miller to coordinate.

USGS
March 29, 2010

Brucellosis, a bacterial infection of cattle, elk and bison, appears to be increasing in several elk populations in northwestern Wyoming, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study recently released in the publication Ecological Applications.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 4, 2009

Greater sage-grouse populations have declined substantially in many areas in the West, though populations in some locations remain relatively stable, according to a comprehensive publication written by federal, state, and non-governmental organizations. The population assessment is one of numerous sage-grouse topics covered in the 24 chapters released today.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 21, 2009

Idaho Developed Mapping Method Garners Prestigious Award. Data from earth observing Landsat satellites plays a central role in a new, award-winning type of mapping that tracks water use. Water-use maps help save taxpayer money by increasing the accuracy and effectiveness of public decisions involving water – for instance, in monitoring compliance with legal water rights. The maps are especially

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 28, 2009

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research hydrologist Dr. Yousif Kharaka will present a talk in Cheyenne, Wyo. about the feasibility and implications of capturing and storing the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide underground in depleted oil fields and deep rock formations with salty aquifers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 16, 2009

Water produced by the High Plains aquifer, which provides water to eight states, is generally acceptable for human consumption, irrigation, and livestock watering, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study highlighted at the summer meeting of the Western States Water Council in Park City, Utah.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 15, 2009

Tracking Native Mussels on the Mississippi River
For the first time ever, mussels in the Mississippi River will be radio tagged and their movements observed during the water-level drawdown that is scheduled to begin next week.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 28, 2009

New U.S. Geological Survey research indicates that ammonia from water used in the production of natural gas from underground coal beds in Wyoming is entering the Powder River.
"High concentrations of ammonia are toxic, particularly at some of the higher pH values found in these discharged waters," said USGS scientist Richard Smith.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 2, 2009

Striking new glacier retreat photographs created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) visually illustrate the effects of climate change on Glacier National Park.
The glacier images reveal dramatic glacial decline over a century and are in line with predictions that all of the glaciers in Glacier National Park will disappear by 2030.