Unified Interior Regions

Wyoming

The Rocky Mountain Region ranges from the Colorado Rockies to the Western Deserts to the Great Plains. The Rocky Mountain Region conducts multi- and interdisciplinary research and monitoring in locations across the Region, the United States, around the world, and across our solar system.

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States L2 Landing Page Tabs

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Measuring streamflow in Pass Creek, near Parkman, WY, station 06289600
December 27, 2017

Measuring streamflow under ice, Pass Creek, nr Parkman, WY

Measuring streamflow under ice, Pass Creek, near Parkman, WY, station 06289600

Outside stream stage of Bull Lake Creek abv Bull Lake
December 13, 2017

Reading stream stage at Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake streamgage

The wire weight is lowered to determine stage of Bull Lake Creek above Bull Lake

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 09219200
November 29, 2017

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 0921920

Wire weight mounted on bridge crossing Blacks Fork, streamgage 09219200

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad
October 17, 2017

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad

Setting up to measure streamflow, Muddy Creek near Dad

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River
October 6, 2017

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River

Installing new radar sensor and staff plate, Big Sandy River

Scientist explains trench work to media
September 20, 2017

Teton Fault

Chris explains the Teton trench work with local media members and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort engineer Bill Schreiber. 

Trench site and fault scarp
September 19, 2017

Teton Fault

Photo taken from the UAV (drone) of the trench site and continuation of the fault scarp (steep slope above the mowed grass) with Teton Village in the background.

Scientists collect and OSL sample
September 18, 2017

Teton Fault

Rich, Nicole, and Seth keep the tarps in places while Chris (he's the one you can't see under the tarp) collects an OSL sample in darkness.

Scientists take charcoal sample
September 17, 2017

Teton Fault

Chris and Ralph take a sample of charcoal for radiocarbon dating. 

Scientists take a sample for OSL dating from trench wall
September 17, 2017

Teton Fault

Mark and Rich collect a sample for optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating by pounding a metal tube into the trench wall.

Scientist completes a trench log
September 16, 2017

Teton Fault

Chris adds the finishing touches to a trench log.

Filter Total Items: 112
USGS
June 22, 2004

Water samples collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in areas surrounding the Great Salt Lake in parts of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming generally meet existing guidelines for drinking water and the protection of aquatic life, although water quality in some specific areas have elevated concentrations of pesticides...

USGS
June 22, 2004

Trace amounts of pesticides or volative organic compounds (VOCs) were detected in ground water sampled from public-supply wells in Salt Lake Valley if the age of the sampled water was less than about 50 years, according to a report recently released by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS
June 22, 2004

A 5-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey on the occurrence and distribution of trace elements and synthetic organic compounds in sediment and fish from the Great Salt Lake Basin area of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming found that trace elements were elevated in areas affected by historic mining, and organic compounds were highest at sites with urban and agricultural land use.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

USGS
May 14, 2004

America’s rivers and streams are generally suitable for irrigation, supplying drinking water, and home and recreational uses. However, in areas with significant agricultural and urban development, the quality of our nation’s water resources has been degraded by contaminants such as pesticides, nutrients, and gasoline-related compounds.

Set of frying pan springs located between Porkchop Geyser and Basti...
December 1, 2003

Yellowstone Caldera Chronicles is a weekly article written by U.S. Geological Survey Yellowstone Volcano Observatory scientists and colleagues. This week's article is about monitoring the geysers in the Norris Geyser Basin.

USGS science for a changing world logo
October 8, 2003

Included this month:

Hurricane Isabel Makes Her Mark on the North Carolina Coast

Mayans in the Everglades?

Submerged Ice Bridge Reveals Ancient Secrets About Alaska

America’s Deepest Coral Reef

Young Tortises on Mojave’s Menu

Measuring Floods From A Distance

Is the World’s Fuel Tank on Empty?

USGS
February 14, 2003

Not long ago, conventional wisdom was that you couldn’t predict the climate for more than a few days in advance. Then came the awareness of El Niño and La Niña and the forecast window increased to as much as 6 to 9 months, depending on the region and season.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 16, 2002

The USGS has just completed an assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and natural gas resources in five geologic basins in the Rocky Mountain region. The assessed basins are: Uinta-Piceance of Colorado and Utah, Southwestern Wyoming (Greater Green River Basin), San Juan Basin of New Mexico and Colorado, Montana Thrust Belt, and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana.

USGS
December 16, 2002

The USGS has just completed an assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and natural gas resources in five geologic basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 14, 2001

 

May 14, 2001 – The U. S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park and the University of Utah have signed an agreement to establish the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory to strengthen long-term monitoring of earthquakes and the slumbering volcano beneath Yellowstone National Park. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 8, 2001

Federal, state and local policy makers will gather in Casper, Wyoming, on May 9-10 to examine science issues associated with the development of coalbed methane. The two-day conference and field trip, sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), will examine a number of topics including: what is coalbed methane, how it forms, where it occurs, how it is developed, and consequences of development.