Coasts

Filter Total Items: 356
Date published: May 15, 2021
Status: Active

Alaska North Slope LiDAR

High-resolution light detection and ranging (lidar) elevation data were acquired along the north coast of Alaska between 2009 and 2012. The lidar acquisition, from Icy Cape, Alaska to the United States/Canadian border, comprised approximately 11,000 km2. The airborne lidar data were acquired in support of the U.S. Geological Survey...

Date published: November 12, 2020
Status: Active

Upcoming Webinar: Climate Adaptation Science to Support Amphibian Conservation in the U.S. Caribbean

View this webinar to learn more about a climate-informed adaptation strategy for vulnerable species in the Caribbean.

Date published: October 9, 2020
Status: Active

Coastal Sediment Availability and Flux (CSAF) Capabilities

As part of the Coastal Sediment Availability and Flux project, we use innovative technology and integrate a variety of techniques to characterize barrier island environments, reconstruct their past history, and predict their future...

Date published: October 8, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Santa Cruz Beaches

Two video cameras atop the Dream Inn hotel in Santa Cruz, California, overlook the coast in northern Monterey Bay. One camera looks eastward over Santa Cruz Main Beach and boardwalk, while the other looks southward over Cowells Beach.

Date published: October 8, 2020
Status: Active

Featured Photos and Videos

Keep watching this page for more photos from our scientists!

Contacts: Laura Torresan
Date published: October 8, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Tres Palmas

Four video cameras look westward over the coast and the coral reef at Tres Palmas in Rincón, on the west coast of Puerto Rico. Two cameras look out at the horizon and over the ocean for the mid-field view; one camera offers a zoomed-in, far-field view overlooking the reef and out to the island of Desecheo, a U.S. National Wildlife Refuge; and another camera focuses on the beach.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Miguel Canals-Silander, Patricia Chardon Maldonado
Date published: September 29, 2020
Status: Active

COAWST Training Workshops

Currently the Coupled-Ocean-Atmospherre-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST) has 800 registered users from around the world. To advance the user community of the COAWST modeling system, the USGS has held trainings every two years since 2012. In general...

Date published: September 29, 2020
Status: Active

COAWST System Components

The Coupled-Ocean-Atmospherre-Wave-Sediment Transport Modeling System (COAWST) modeling system currently contains the following sophisticated systems:

Date published: September 28, 2020
Status: Active

Climate check in our Santa Cruz backyard

For a beach town like Santa Cruz, preserving beaches by mitigating coastal erosion is vital. Surveys conducted now and regularly in the future will help scientists understand the short- and long-term impacts of climate change, El Niño years, and sea-level rise on a populated and vulnerable coastline.

Date published: September 18, 2020
Status: Active

Modeling Barrier Island Evolution, Shoreface Morphology, and Overwash

Barrier island field observations provide information about past and current environmental conditions and changes over time; however, they can’t tell us about the future. Models can predict possible future behaviors but are only as good as their input data. By integrating both observations and models, we can extend observations and arrive at more realistic predictions of barrier island...

Date published: September 18, 2020
Status: Active

Shoreface Morphology and Geology

Exchanges of sediment between the shoreface and barrier islands allow barrier islands to adjust to changes in water level, such as those associated with storms or sea-level rise. Characterizing shoreface morphology and geology allows us to explore how past and present processes have impacted modern barrier island sediment transport and what that means for future barrier island evolution.

Date published: September 18, 2020
Status: Active

Barrier Island Sensitivity to Changes in Sediment Supply

Observations and models show that maintaining barrier islands requires a balance between sea-level rise and sediment supply. However, most estimates of sediment supply are not based on modern conditions, which could result in less accurate predictions of sediment fluxes. We explore how natural and human alterations impact modern sediment fluxes, or changes, on barrier islands – research that...