Coasts

Filter Total Items: 102
Date published: July 24, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Change Processes- South Carolina

Understanding the processes that control local sediment fluxes is critical in evaluating regional vulnerability to coastal erosion. This project task involves the analysis of observational data collected as part of the South Carolina Coastal Erosion Study (SCCES), and additional coastal process modeling for the Grand Strand region....

Date published: July 24, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Change Processes- Cape Hatteras, NC

The most prominent morphologic features along the shoreline of the Carolinas are its four capes. From north to south, Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, Cape Fear, and Cape Romain segment the coastline into the northern outer banks, Raliegh Bay, Onslo Bay, and Long Bay regions. Continental shelf areas seaward of the capes are characterized by large, highly dynamic shoal complexes, which influence...

Date published: July 24, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Change Processes- Outer Banks, NC

The objective of this task is to improve the capabilities of coastal change models to predict large-scale shoreline change on open-ocean sandy coasts, with specific application to the Northern Outer Banks of North Carolina. Numerical models will be tested and developed using high-resolution observations of geological framework and shoreline change in North Carolina, with the objective of first...

Date published: July 24, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Change Processes- Fire Island, NY

Fire Island, a 50-km long barrier-island system between Fire Island Inlet and Moriches Inlet, attracts significant tourism, includes federal, state, and county parks, contains a number of coastal communities, provides storm damage protection to the adjacent heavily populated mainland, and supports a distinct barrier island ecosystem, all of which are affected by coastal change.  Mitigating the...

Date published: July 18, 2018
Status: Active

A Critical Assessment of Recent Soil Dating Methods in Coastal Wetlands (Internship Opportunity)

Are you interested in coastal wetlands and how they form in the landscape? In this internship you will learn about wetland formation and how carbon accumulates in wetland soils over time. In addition, you will learn to learn how to critically evaluate soil dating methods that are currently being used to report carbon accumulation to the US EPA and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change...

Contacts: Judith Drexler
Date published: July 17, 2018
Status: Active

A tale of two coasts: tidal marsh persistence with changing climate and sea-level rise (Internship Opportunity)

Tidal wetlands are an important management concern because of their ability to attenuate storm surges, sequester carbon, improve water quality, and provide habitat for tidal marsh-dependent species.  The overall goal of this project is to improve our understanding of the combined effects of inundation, due to sea-level rise and storm surges, and other climate factor on tidal marsh physical and...

Contacts: Karen Thorne
Date published: July 16, 2018
Status: Active

Sandy Hook Gateway National Recreation Area Study

The Sandy Hook Unit, Gateway National Recreation Area (hereafter Sandy Hook) in New Jersey is a 10-kilometer-long spit visited by thousands of people each year who take advantage of the historical and natural resources and recreational opportunities.

Date published: July 5, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Change Processes

The primary objective of this project is to increase our understanding of the physical processes that cause coastal change, and ultimately improve our capability to predict the processes and their impacts. This will be approached by using geophysical surveys, oceanographic studies, and predictive models to investigate the interactions of shoreline, nearshore, and offshore sediment transport...

Date published: June 25, 2018
Status: Active

Sea Level Rise Hazards and Decision Support

The Sea Level Rise Hazards and Decision Support project assesses the potential impacts of sea level rise and provides tools for coastal management decision making.   Historical and recent observations of coastal change are combined with model simulations of coastal environments such as barrier islands, wetlands, and coastal aquifers. A variety of methods including Bayesian...

Date published: June 14, 2018
Status: Active

PS-CoSMoS: Puget Sound Coastal Storm Modeling System

The CoSMoS model is currently available for most of the California coast and is now being expanded to support the 4.5 million coastal residents of the Puget Sound region, with emphasis on the communities bordering the sound.

Date published: June 14, 2018
Status: Active

Operational CoSMoS model: San Francisco Bay

The San Francisco Bay Coastal Flood Forecast pilot project is an operational CoSMoS model, part of a project funded by the California Department of Water Resources (CA-DWR) and NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL).

Date published: June 13, 2018
Status: Active

CoSMoS 3.0: Southern California

CoSMoS 3.0 for southern California provides detailed predictions of coastal flooding due to both future sea-level rise and storms, integrated with predictions of long-term coastal evolution (beach changes and coastal cliff retreat) for the Southern California region, from Point Conception (Santa Barbara County) to Imperial Beach (San Diego County).