Data, Tools, and Technology

Filter Total Items: 502
Date published: February 25, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Tres Palmas

Four video cameras look westward over the coast and the coral reef at Tres Palmas in Rincón, on the west coast of Puerto Rico. Two cameras look out at the horizon and over the ocean for the mid-field view; one camera offers a zoomed-in, far-field view overlooking the reef and out to the island of Desecheo, a U.S. National Wildlife Refuge; and another camera focuses on the beach.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, Miguel Canals-Silander, Patricia Chardon Maldonado
Date published: February 20, 2020
Status: Active

Tracking Data for Pacific Loons (Gavia pacifica)

Available here are tracking data of Pacific Loons, a species that breeds throughout much of Alaska and winters throughout the Pacific Ocean basin, along the costs of East Asia and the U.S.  These data were collected to better understand timing of spring arrival, fall departure, and habitat use patterns on the North Slope of Alaska.

Date published: February 14, 2020
Status: Active

Coastal Change at Fire Island, a geonarrative

Approximately 60 miles from the skyscrapers and fast-pace of New York City, Fire Island stretches 31 miles along the south shore of Long Island. The sandy beaches and pristine wilderness areas of Fire Island National Seashore are dotted with secluded residential communities. The island is fronted by the Atlantic Ocean, so in addition to its natural and recreational value, Fire Island is also...

Date published: February 14, 2020
Status: Active

Climate impacts to Arctic coasts

The Arctic region is warming faster than anywhere else in the nation. Understanding the rates and causes of coastal change in Alaska is needed to identify and mitigate hazards that might affect people and animals that call Alaska home.

Date published: February 10, 2020
Status: Active

NPPSD Sampling Effort Maps

Maps showing the extent of sampling done and entered into the North Pacific Pelagic Seabird Database (NPPSD).

Date published: February 7, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Santa Cruz Beaches

Two video cameras atop the Dream Inn hotel in Santa Cruz, California, overlook the coast in northern Monterey Bay. One camera looks eastward over Santa Cruz Main Beach and boardwalk, while the other looks southward over Cowells Beach. The cameras are part of the Remote Sensing Coastal Change project.

Date published: February 5, 2020
Status: Active

Coral Reef Project

Explore the fascinating undersea world of coral reefs. Learn how we map, monitor, and model coral reefs so we can better understand, protect, and preserve our Nation's reefs.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: February 4, 2020
Status: Active

Regional Science Portal

Welcome to the Regional Science Portal. On this site, you will find the scientific research, data, and information USGS has completed for this Region. For a geospatial view of the projects, please click the map to the right to see a larger interactive view to the areas USGS has studied in detail. Each of the tabs below lists all of the completed product offerings the USGS has completed for the...

Date published: January 30, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Sunset State Beach

Two video cameras overlook the coast at Sunset State Beach in Watsonville, California. Camera 1 looks northwest while Camera 2 looks north. The cameras are part of the Remote Sensing Coastal Change project.

Date published: January 30, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Unalakleet

Two video cameras overlook the coast from atop a windmill tower in Unalakleet, Alaska where they look westward over Norton Sound.

Date published: January 30, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Whidbey Island

From May of 2018 through November of 2019, USGS scientists collected imagery from video cameras overlooking the coast along a beach on Whidbey Island, Island County at the northern boundary of Puget Sound in western Washington.

    Contacts: Eric Grossman
    Date published: January 29, 2020
    Status: Active

    Remote Sensing Coastal Change

    We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines.