Environmental Health

Filter Total Items: 185
Date published: May 23, 2018
Status: Active

Rangeland Ecosystem Services

The Rangeland Ecosystem Services research described below is conducted and managed under the USGS Applied Landscape Ecology and Remote Sensing project and partners.

Date published: May 23, 2018
Status: Active

Ecological Forecasting

The Ecological Forecasting research described below is conducted and managed under the USGS Applied Landscape Ecology and Remote Sensing project and partners.

Contacts: Kristin Byrd
Date published: May 23, 2018
Status: Active

Coastal Wetland Blue Carbon

The Coastal Wetland Blue Carbon research described below is conducted and managed under the USGS Applied Landscape Ecology and Remote Sensing project and partners.

Date published: May 23, 2018
Status: Active

Applied Landscape Ecology and Remote Sensing

We focus on landscape studies of natural and working lands, in coastal and inland wetlands, and rangelands. We measure ecosystem benefits, find areas vulnerable to change, and identify potential for climate mitigation and resilience. We conduct research by scaling field measurements to the regional, state and national scale with remote sensing, geospatial analysis, and modeling. We emphasize...

Contacts: Kristin Byrd
Date published: May 21, 2018
Status: Active

Center Laboratories

The Geology, Geophysics, and Geochemistry Science Center has several laboratories, ranging from geophysics to geochemistry to spectroscopy to scanning electron microscopes.

 

 

Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Coral Reef Project

Explore the fascinating undersea world of coral reefs. Learn how we map, monitor, and model coral reefs so we can better understand, protect, and preserve our Nation's reefs.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Circulation and Sediment, Nutrient, Contaminant, and Larval Dynamics on Reefs

Terrigenous sediment run-off and deposition on coral reefs can significantly impact coral health by blocking light and inhibiting photosynthesis, directly smothering and abrading coral, and triggering increases in macro algae. The delivery of sediment and pollutants to reefs have increased globally as a response to human-induced changes to watersheds, as pointed out in the U.S. Commission on...

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Sea-Level Rise and Climate Change Impacts to Reefs

Based on rates of vertical reef accretion in Hawaiʻi and throughout the Pacific, it is unlikely that reefs there and other locations will keep pace with the rising sea levels, and their inability to do so will lead to subtle but important changes in selected physical processes on some coral reefs.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Resilience and Recovery: Science for Future Reefs

Coral reefs are facing increasing stress from climate change (elevated sea-surface temperatures and acidification), combined with local stresses from over-fishing and sedimentation and other sources of land-based pollution. In light of the potential for these stressors to increase the rate of coral reef degradation to epidemic levels, coral reef scientists and managers world-wide are shifting...

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Coral Reef Project: Guam

The USGS is working with the National Park Service on the west coast of Guam to help determine the effects of sedimentation in the nearshore waters.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Coral Reef Project: Kahoʻolawe

Due to the deforestation of the island of Kahoʻolawe, there is a significant problem with erosion and sediment run-off into the nearshore environment.

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi
Date published: May 11, 2018
Status: Active

Coral Reef Project: Kauaʻi

USGS is working to identify circulation patterns and a sediment budget for Hanalei Bay to help determine any effects to the coastal marine ecosystem including coral reefs. 

Contacts: Curt Storlazzi