Mapping, Remote Sensing, and Geospatial Data

Filter Total Items: 576
Date published: January 31, 2020
Status: Active

Deep Learning for Automated Detection and Classification of Waterfowl, Seabirds, and other Wildlife from Digital Aerial Imagery

In collaboration with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Vision Group at the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California - Berkeley, the U.S. Geological Survey Upper Midwest Environmental Sciences Center is developing deep learning algorithms and tools for the automatic detection, enumeration, classification, and...

Date published: January 30, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Wave Dynamics: Unalakleet

Two video cameras overlook the coast from atop a windmill tower in Unalakleet, Alaska where they look westward over Norton Sound.

Date published: January 30, 2020
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Whidbey Island

From May of 2018 through November of 2019, USGS scientists collected imagery from video cameras overlooking the coast along a beach on Whidbey Island, Island County at the northern boundary of Puget Sound in western Washington.

    Contacts: Eric Grossman
    Date published: January 29, 2020
    Status: Active

    Remote Sensing Coastal Change

    We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines.

    Date published: January 22, 2020
    Status: Active

    Mapping High Marsh along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast

    USGS is collaborating with Mississippi State University to investigate the effects of fire on Gulf of Mexico marshes. The project will include mapping high marsh and monitoring black rail, yellow rail, and mottled duck responses to prescribed fire application.

    Date published: January 22, 2020
    Status: Active

    Using Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) Capabilities to Help Identify Giant Salvinia (Salvinia molesta) and the effects of Salvinia weevil (Cyrtogagous salviniae)

    USGS is collecting remotely sensed data to classify Salvinia molesta, a non-native aquatic species that reduces light and oxygen levels in water, making it unsuitable for fish and other aquatic plant life.

    Date published: January 21, 2020
    Status: Active

    The Value of U.S. Coral Reefs for Risk Reduction

    Summary of the report, “Rigorously valuing the role of U.S. coral reefs in coastal hazard risk reduction”

      Contacts: Curt Storlazzi, PhD, Michael Beck
      Date published: December 31, 2019
      Status: Active

      California Seafloor Mapping Program mapping progress

      Table shows USGS California Seafloor Mapping Program progress by block number, as of August 2019.

      Date published: December 16, 2019
      Status: Active

      California Seafloor Mapping Program

      The California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP) is a cooperative program to create a comprehensive coastal/marine geologic and habitat base map series for all of California's State waters. The California Ocean Protection Council (COPC) authorized funds to establish the CSMP in 2007 and assembled a team of experts from state and federal agencies, academia, and private industry to develop the...

      Date published: December 13, 2019
      Status: Active

      Using Video Imagery to Study Head of the Meadow Beach

      Two video cameras are mounted on a bluff near Head of the Meadow Beach, Cape Cod National Seashore, North Truro, MA. One camera looks alongshore toward the north-northeast, and the second looks directly offshore (northeast). The cameras are part of a U.S. Geological Survey research project to study the beach and nearshore environment shared by beachgoers, shorebirds, seals, and sharks. The...

      Date published: December 5, 2019
      Status: Active

      Webinar: A Coastal Hazard Assessment with High-Resolution Data: A Pacific Island Case Study

      View this webinar to learn how Pacific Islands CASC supported researchers are using high resolution data to assess the Pacific Islands vulnerability to coastal hazards.

      Date published: October 21, 2019
      Status: Active

      Ozark Dome-Arkoma Basin-Ouachita Transect

      The Ozark Dome-Arkoma Basin-Ouachita Transect (ODABOuT) project examines the three-dimensional geology of a transect of the southern orogenic margin of North America in its best surface exposure in western Arkansas. The Ozark Dome and Arkoma Basin represent a foreland uplift and foreland basin that formed as a result of the impinging Ouachita orogenic belt. Understanding the geometry and...