Oceans

Filter Total Items: 178
Date published: June 14, 2019
Status: Active

CMHRP Links with Other Mission Areas

Strategy: Coordinate with other USGS Mission Areas and Programs to understand and predict the complex interactions within coastal and marine systems and the environmental and human consequences of natural and human processes.

There are several emerging and established opportunities for collaborative prioritization, planning, and program development with other Mission Areas.

Date published: June 13, 2019
Status: Active

Marine Seismic Imaging

The USGS Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources Program is a leader in the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of high-resolution seismic data collected in the open ocean, on the continental shelf, and in estuaries, lakes, canals, and rivers. Depending on the scientific target of a survey, the CMHRP uses a variety of acoustic sources (chirp, sparker, boomer, or airguns) to image sediment...

Date published: June 12, 2019
Status: Active

Gas Hydrate Resources

The CMHRP partners with the USGS Energy Resource Program (ERP) in the USGS Energy and Minerals Mission Area in studies of natural gas hydratesGas hydrate is a solid, ice-like form of water and gas (usually methane) that is widespread...

Date published: June 12, 2019
Status: Active

Seafloor Minerals

The seafloor contains deposits of minerals that we we use in everyday life such as copper, zinc, nickel, gold, silver, and phosphorus. These deposits occur as crusts on volcanic and other rocks and as nodules on abyssal plain sediment that are typically about 3 to 10 centimeters (1 to 4 inches) in diameter.

Date published: June 12, 2019
Status: Active

Islands

The CMHRP studies the physical and geological processes that affect islands and their margins. The data that the CMHRP collects are used to document historical and contemporary baseline conditions on islands and to track the impact of short-term ocean events and longer-term sea level rise. This information feeds into forecasts of the islands' future vulnerabilities and provides support for...

Date published: June 11, 2019
Status: Active

Coral Reefs

Shallow water (less than ~150 m water depth) coral reefs are seafloor structures built from the calcium carbonate skeletons of marine organisms. Reefs buffer shorelines from waves, storm surges, and tsunamis and help to protect ~200 million of the world's coastal dwellers from flooding, erosion, property damage, and loss of life. Reefs support high levels of biodiversity; they are home to up...

Date published: June 11, 2019
Status: Active

Gas Hydrate and the Environment

Gas hydrate is an ice-like substance formed when methane or some other gases combine with water at appropriate pressure and temperature conditions. Nearly the entire global inventory of gas hydrates is confined to sediments in a zone tens to hundreds of meters thick close to the seafloor at water depths greater...

Date published: June 11, 2019
Status: Active

Pacific Coral Reefs

Coral reefs are unique ecosystems of plants, animals, and their associated geological framework. Although they cover less than 0.5% of Earth's surface, coral reefs are home to an estimated 25% of all marine species. Of the total coral reef habitat in United States waters, about 75%, or more than 16,000 square kilometers (6,000 square miles), is located in the Pacific Ocean.

Date published: June 10, 2019
Status: Active

CMHRP Response to Hurricane Sandy in Estuaries and Wetlands

In late October 2012, Hurricane Sandy made landfall on the eastern seaboard of the United States, affecting the coastline from North Carolina to New York and Massachusetts. In addition to causing more than 200 human fatalities, the storm altered coastal landscapes, geology, hydrology, environmental quality, and ecosystems. Damage to infrastructure from Hurricane Sandy totaled over $75 billion...

Date published: June 10, 2019
Status: Active

Delineating the U.S. Extended Continental Shelf

The United States has an interest in knowing the full extent of its continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles from shore (called the extended continental shelf, or ECS) so that it can better protect, manage, and use the seabed resources contained therein. The USGS is a member of the U.S. ECS Task Force, an interagency group that brings together a wide range of U.S. government agencies,...

Date published: June 10, 2019
Status: Active

The Coastal Storm Modeling System

The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) provides emergency responders and coastal planners with critical storm-hazard information such as flood extent, flood depth, duration of flooding, wave height, and currents that can be used to increase public safety, mitigate physical damages, and more effectively manage complex coastal settings....

Date published: June 9, 2019
Status: Active

California Seafloor and Coastal Mapping Program

A Foundation for Characterizing Hazards, Monitoring Change, and Managing Resources