Unified Interior Regions

Region 1: North Atlantic-Appalachian

Our Science Centers

Our Science Centers

The NAA Region has 15 Science Centers spanning 14 NE States and Washington, DC. The Centers conduct interdisciplinary biologic, geologic, hydrologic, and energy monitoring and research addressing natural resource issues facing our nation.

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February Photo Contest

February Photo Contest

Check out the winning photographs in the February 2020 Photo Contest! Categories include People, USGS at Work, Where We Work, and Honorable Mention

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Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,145
Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Morphological variation of Plethodon shenandoah and Plethodon cinereus in high-elevation areas of Shenandoah National Park

In order for resource managers at Shenandoah National Park to implement long-term monitoring for the federally-endangered Shenandoah salamander, Plethodon shenandoah, absolute certain identification of the species in the field is critical.

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Stream salamanders in Shenandoah National Park: Movement and survival of stream salamander populations

Research in population biology is concerned with factors affecting the change in a population over time, including births, deaths, immigration and emigration. Despite the potential importance of immigration and emigration, empirical data on movement patterns are lacking in many systems.

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Monitoring Vernal Pool Amphibians in the Northeast

In 2004, the Northeast Amphibian Research Monitoring Initiative (NE ARMI) received funding from the National Park Service’s Park Oriented Biological Support, and combined these monies with ARMI funds to initiate a region-wide study on the distribution of vernal pools and estimate the proportion of pools that were occupied by pool-associated amphibians (specifically, wood frogs, Lithobates...

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Monitoring the Shenandoah salamander in Shenandoah National Park

The Shenandoah salamander (Plethodon shenandoah) is a federally endangered species found only within the boundaries of Shenandoah National Park, Virginia.  This terrestrial salamander is isolated to approximately 6 km² of dry talus slopes at high elevations in the park.  Results of previous research suggest that P. shenandoah is competitively excluded to suboptimal talus...

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Elucidating mechanisms underlying amphibian declines in North America using hierarchical spatial models

The Powell Center facilitates the implementation of new and innovative processes to increase scientific understanding aimed at resolving significant and complex issues, as outlined in the USGS Science Strategy. A hallmark of the Powell Center is that it is “a scientist-driven institution where leveraging existing research efforts produces...

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Amphibian monitoring in the National Capital Region

The National Capital Region Network has identified amphibians as a priority taxonomic group for its Inventory and Monitoring program. Amphibian monitoring was initiated in 2005, and is currently concentrated in Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park (CHOH) and Rock Creek Park (ROCR), with stream sampling also occurring in Prince William Forest Park (PRWI).

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Completed

Making Decisions for Headwater Stream Conservation at the Watershed Scale

There is growing evidence that headwater stream ecosystems are especially vulnerable to changing climate and land use, but their conservation is challenged by the need to address the threats at a landscape scale, often through coordination with multiple management agencies and landowners.

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Climate Change

Climate change could pose a number of problems for amphibians, and can be grouped into 4 main categories:

1) changes in the local environments they inhabit (soil temperature, prey availability)

2) changes in the phenology (timing) of activities such as foraging and breeding

3) changes in the presence of pathogens and exotic species

4) interactions of climate with...

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Research and Monitoring

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Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Conservation Concerns

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Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

Amphibian Diseases

Amphibian diseases are emerging as an important concern in the study of amphibian declines. While NE ARMI does not focus intensively on amphibian disease research, the issue plays an important role in our activities.

Date published: February 2, 2018
Status: Active

NE ARMI - Collaborators and Partners

Partners and Collaborators of the Northeast Amphibian Research & Monitoring Initiative

Filter Total Items: 15,610
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Year Published: 2018

Use of Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) burrows as shelter by Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) chicks

The availability of shelter to avoid predation and ameliorate physiologically stressful conditions is often important to the survival of avian hatchlings. However, as changes in habitat availability force birds to nest in nontraditional locations, young must quickly adapt to using novel sources of shelter. Two Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) colonies...

McGowan, Peter C.; Reintsma, Kaitlyn; Sullivan, Jeffery D.; DeVoss, Katie P.; Wall, Jennifer L.; Zimnik, Mia D.; Callahan, Carl R.; Schultz, Bill; Prosser, Diann J.
McGowan, P. C., Reinstma, K. M., Sullivan, J. D., DeVoss, K. P., Wall, J. L., Zimnik, M. D., Callahan, C. R., Schultz, B., and Prosser, D. J., 2018, Use of Bank Swallow (Riparia riparia) burrows as shelter by Common Tern (Sterna hirundo) chicks: Waterbirds, v. 41, no. 2, p. 179-182. https://doi.org/10.1675/063.041.0210

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Year Published: 2018

Exposure to synthetic hydraulic fracturing waste influences the mucosal bacterial community structure of the brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) epidermis

Production of natural gas using unconventional technologies has risen as demand for alternative fuels has increased. Impacts on the environment from waste generated from these processes are largely unexplored. In particular, the outcomes of organismal exposure to hydraulic fracturing waste have not been rigorously evaluated. We evaluated the...

Galbraith, Heather S.; Iwanowicz, Deborah D.; Spooner, Daniel E.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Keller, David; Zelanko, Paula M.; Adams, Cynthia R.

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Year Published: 2018

Characterizing the sponge grounds of Grays Canyon, Washington, USA

Deep-sea sponge grounds are relatively understudied ecosystems that may provide key habitats for a large number of fish and invertebrates including commercial species. Glass sponge grounds have been discovered from the tropics to polar regions but there are only a few places with high densities of dictyonine sponges. Dictyonine glass sponges have...

Powell, Abby N.; Clarke, M. Elizabeth; Fruh, Erica; Chaytor, Jason; Reiswig, Henry M.; Whitmire, Curt E.
Powell, A., Clarke, M.E., Fruh, E., Chaytor, J., Reiswig, H.M., Whitmire, C.E., 2018, Characterizing the deep-sea sponge grounds of Grays Canyon, Washington: Deep-Sea Research Part II, v. 150, 146-155 p doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2018.01.004.

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Year Published: 2018

Integrating animal movement with habitat suitability for estimating dynamic landscape connectivity

Context High-resolution animal movement data are becoming increasingly available, yet having a multitude of empirical trajectories alone does not allow us to easily predict animal movement. To answer ecological and evolutionary questions at a population level, quantitative estimates of a species’ potential to link patches or populations are of...

van Toor, Mariëlle L.; Kranstauber, Bart; Newman, Scott H.; Prosser, Diann J.; Takekawa, John Y.; Technitis, Georgios; Weibel, Robert; Wikelski, Martin; Safi, Kamran
van Toor, M. L., Kranstauber, B., Newman, S. H., Prosser, D. J., Takekawa, J. Y., Technitis, G., Weibel, R., Wikelski, M., and Safi, K., 2018, Integrating animal movement with habitat suitability for estimating dynamic landscape connectivity: Landscape Ecology, v. 33, no. 6, p. 879-893.

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Year Published: 2018

Reductive dechlorination rates of 4,4′-DDE (1-chloro-4-[2,2-dichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethenyl]benzene) in sediments of the Palos Verdes Shelf, CA

Wastes from the world's largest manufacturer of DDT (1-chloro-4-[2,2,2-trichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]benzene) were released into the Los Angeles County municipal sewer system from 1947 to 1971. Following primary treatment, the effluent was discharged through a submarine outfall system whereupon a portion of the DDT and associated degradation...

Eganhouse, Robert P.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Pontolillo, James; Edwards, Brian; Dickhudt, Patrick J.
Robert P. Eganhouse, Christopher R. Sherwood, James Pontolillo, Brian D. Edwards, Patrick J. Dickhudt, Reductive dechlorination rates of 4,4′-DDE (1-chloro-4-[2,2-dichloro-1-(4-chlorophenyl)ethenyl]benzene) in sediments of the Palos Verdes Shelf, CA, Marine Chemistry, Volume 203, 2018, pages 10-21.

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Year Published: 2018

Seagrass impact on sediment exchange between tidal flats and salt Marsh, and the sediment budget of shallow bays

Seagrasses are marine flowering plants that strongly impact their physical and biological surroundings and are therefore frequently referred to as ecological engineers. The effect of seagrasses on coastal bay resilience and sediment transport dynamics is understudied. Here we use six historical maps of seagrass distribution in Barnegat Bay, USA,...

Donatelli, Carmine; Ganju, Neil Kamal; Fagherazzi, Sergio; Leonardi, Nicoletta
Donatelli, C., Ganju, N. K., Fagherazzi, S., & Leonardi, N. (2018). Seagrass impact on sediment exchange between tidal flats and salt marsh, and the sediment budget of shallow bays. Geophysical Research Letters, 45. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018GL078056

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Year Published: 2018

Bedrock geologic map of the Littleton and Lower Waterford quadrangles, Essex and Caledonia Counties, Vermont, and Grafton County, New Hampshire

The bedrock geologic map of the Littleton and Lower Waterford quadrangles covers an area of approximately 107 square miles (277 square kilometers) north and south of the Connecticut River in east-central Vermont and adjacent New Hampshire. This map was created as part of a larger effort to produce a new bedrock geologic map of Vermont through the...

Rankin, Douglas W.
Rankin, D.W., 2018, Bedrock geologic map of the Littleton and Lower Waterford quadrangles, Essex and Caledonia Counties, Vermont, and Grafton County, New Hampshire: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1087, 1 sheet, scale 1:24,000, https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181087.

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Year Published: 2018

The complete mitochondrial genome of the stalk-forming diatom Didymosphenia geminata

The complete mitogenome of the stalk-forming diatom Didymosphenia geminata collected from Mineral County, WV, USA was sequenced on the Ion Torrent PGM and Proton sequencers. The D. geminata mitogenome is 37,765 bp and encodes 35 protein coding genes, 25 tRNAs, and both large and small subunit ribosomal RNA genes. The nad11...

Aunins, Aaron; Hamilton, Donald; King, Timothy L.

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Year Published: 2018

Looking beyond wildlife: Using remote cameras to evaluate accuracy of gridded snow data

The use of remote cameras is widespread in wildlife ecology, yet few examples exist of their utility for collecting environmental data. We used a novel camera trap method to evaluate the accuracy of gridded snow data in a mountainous region of the northeastern US. We were specifically interested in assessing (1) how snow depth observations from...

Sirén, Alexej P.K.; Somos-Valenzuela, Marcelo; Callahan, Catherine; Kilborn, Jillian R.; Duclos, Timothy; Tragert, Cassie; Morelli, Toni Lyn

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Year Published: 2018

GIS-based method for estimating surficial groundwater levels in coastal Virginia using limited information

In many coastal areas, high water tables are present, complicating installation of some stormwater best management practices (BMPs) that rely on infiltration. Regional estimates of the seasonal high water table (SHWT) often rely on sources such as soil surveys taken over a decade ago; these data are static and do not account for groundwater...

Johnson, R.D.; Sample, David J.; McCoy, Kurt J.

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Year Published: 2018

Preliminary geologic framework developed for a proposed environmental monitoring study of a deep, unconventional Marcellus Shale drill site, Washington County, Pennsylvania

BackgroundIn the fall of 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was afforded an opportunity to participate in an environmental monitoring study of the potential impacts of a deep, unconventional Marcellus Shale hydraulic fracturing site. The drill site of the prospective case study is the “Range Resources MCC Partners L.P. Units 1-5H” location (...

Stamm, Robert G.
Stamm, R.G., 2018, Preliminary geologic framework developed for a proposed environmental monitoring study of a deep, unconventional Marcellus Shale drill site, Washington County, Pennsylvania: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1057, 49 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181057.

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Year Published: 2018

Ask not what nature can do for you: A critique of ecosystem services as a communication strategy

Given the urgent need to raise public awareness on biodiversity issues, we review the effectiveness of “ecosystem services” as a frame for promoting biodiversity conservation. Since its inception as a communications tool in the 1970s, the concept of ecosystem services has become pervasive in biodiversity policy. While the goal of securing...

Bekessy, Sarah A.; Runge, Michael C.; Kusmanoff, Alex; Keith, David A.; Wintle, Brendan A.
Bekessy, S. A., Runge, M. C., Kusmanoff, A. M., Keith, D. A., and Wintle, B. A., 2018, Ask not what nature can do for you: A critique of ecosystem services as a communication strategy: Biological Conservation, v. 224, p. 71-74. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2018.05.017

Filter Total Items: 1,581
overview image of elevation model
December 31, 2017

Elevation Model

Basemap of the United States with an overview image of elevation models

Steve Suttles and Neil Ganju surveying the position of a deployed oceanographic platform in Great South Bay, NY
December 31, 2017

Scientific Research in Great South Bay, NY

Steve Suttles and Neil Ganju surveying the position of a deployed oceanographic platform in Great South Bay, NY

Two maps; the left hand one shows brown land, blue water, and red arrows. The right hand one shows colored survey tracklines
December 31, 2017

Maps with key features and shaded relief of the study area

Left: Key features in and around the Gulf of Alaska. A black rectangle outlines our 2016 study area along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather fault. Red arrows indicate relative tectonic plate motions. Right: A shaded relief map of the 2016 study area. Rainbow colors show seafloor depths acquired by the USGS in 2015 and 2016. Red indicates shallower depths. Purple zigzag lines

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Map of marsh shoreline change rates for Edwin B Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge
December 31, 2017

Map of Marsh shoreline change rates

Map of Edwin B Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge, N.J., marsh shoreline change rates.

Backscatter, bathymetry, and hill shaded relief maps
December 31, 2017

Backscatter, bathymetry, and hill shaded relief maps

(A) Maximum Likelihood Classification (MLC) with two inputs, slope, and ISO-classified backscatter for the whole survey area. (B) MLC with five inputs, slope, ISO-classified backscatter, bathymetry, hillshaded-relief, and curvature. (C) RF with five inputs, slope, ISO-classified backscatter, bathymetry, relief, and

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A group of scientists pose on the dock in front of a ship with a blue hull.
December 31, 2017

Ship’s company at the end of the R/V Medeia survey in 2016.

Ship’s company at the end of the R/V Medeia survey in 2016. Left to right, kneeling and sitting: David Maggio (TerraSond), Danny Brothers (USGS), Jackson Currie (USGS), Jared Kluesner (USGS), Becky Wilson (Alaska Department of Fish and Game [ADFG]), Captain Jim deLaBruere (ADFG), and Cedar Stark (ADFG). Back row standing: Brian Andrews (USGS), Uri ten Brink (USGS

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Filter Total Items: 589