Unified Interior Regions

Region 2: South Atlantic-Gulf (Includes Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands)

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 371
Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Incorporating Future Change into Current Conservation Planning: Evaluating Wetland Migration along the Gulf of Mexico under Alternative Sea-Level Rise and Urbanization Scenarios

More than half of contiguous U.S. coastal wetlands are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. These highly-productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services and fish and wildlife habitat. Historically, coastal wetlands have adapted to sea-level changes via lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, coastal wetlands will adapt and migrate...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Macroclimatic Controls of Coastal Wetland Ecosystem Structure and Function

At the global-scale, macroclimatic drivers govern ecosystem structure and function in tidal saline wetlands (e.g., salt marshes, mangrove forests, salt flats). However, global reviews and models for these ecosystems typically do not directly include climatic drivers. The objective of this research is to examine and forecast the effects of macroclimatic drivers on wetland ecosystem structure...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Life History Characterization and Host Fish Identification for Federally Listed and Imperiled Freshwater Mussel Species in the Suwannee River Basin in Georgia and Florida

Freshwater mussels are considered the most imperiled group of animals in the United States. These animals provide valuable ecological services by filtering water, sequestering nutrients, and providing forage for migratory birds, small mammals, and turtles. They also have a unique and complex life cycle that makes them especially vulnerable to human disturbances. It includes a parasitic larval...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluation of Stream Reaches for Mussel Reintroduction in the Upper Coosa Watershed, NW Georgia

The Conasauga River in northwest Georgia and southeast Tennessee harbors the majority of mussel diversity still found in the Georgia portion of the Upper Coosa Basin. While the Conasauga historically supported at least 44 mussel species, only about 20 species remain. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Geographical Trends in Ecosystem Function and Biodiversity of Wetlands as a Surrogate for Climate Change

Extreme drought and temperature in the southeastern United States may become more frequent in the future, and any  extreme shifts in climate condition are likely to have effects on wetland ecosystem function. USGS research predicts the effects of climate change by shifts in function and biodiversity across existing  climate gradients in baldcypress swamps. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Alabama Barrier Island Restoration Assessment at Dauphin Island

Dauphin Island, Alabama, is the only barrier island providing protection to much of Alabama's coastal natural resources. Severely impacted by repeated extreme events, like Hurricane Katrina and Deepwater Horizon oil spill, USGS and partners are conducting a joint study to evaluate the feasibility of certain alternatives to increase resiliency and sustainability of the island. 

Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

GIS and Custom Application Support for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council

The scientists at the Wetland and Aquatic Science Center (WARC) have provided coastal restoration project managers and decision makers with GIS planning, database and custom application capacity since 1992. The scope and complexity of this support has increased over the years and has resulted in the development of a comprehensive geospatial and advanced application teams that provide decision...

Date published: April 15, 2016
Status: Active

Ecosystem Development After Wetland Restoration and Creation

Wetland restoration and creation efforts are increasingly proposed as means to compensate for wetland losses. To address the need for evaluating the development of ecosystem structure and function in restored and created wetlands, USGS compared created tidal wetlands sites to natural mangrove wetlands in Tampa Bay, Florida. 

Date published: April 11, 2016
Status: Active

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program

Welcome to the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) information resource for the United States Geological Survey. Located at Gainesville, Florida, this site has been established as a central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The program provides scientific reports, online/realtime queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, and general...

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Evaluating Structural and Surface Elevation Recovery of Restored Mangroves

Hydrologic restoration is one of several approaches to rehabilitate mangroves on a large-scale. USGS evaluates how solely restoring tidal hydrologic flows affect the recovery of mangroves in Florida. 

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Coastal Wetlands

Wetlands have the potential to absorb large amounts of carbon dioxide via photosynthesis, and flooded soils have low oxygen levels which decrease rates of decomposition to promote the retention of soil carbon. However, the type of greenhouse gases emitted from wetlands varies by wetland type and soil condition. A suite of approaches are being used to assess  fluxes of greenhouses gases, like...

Filter Total Items: 5,343
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Year Published: 2020

Submarine canyons influence macrofaunal diversity and density patterns in the deep-sea benthos

Submarine canyons are often morphologically complex features in the deep sea contributing to habitat heterogeneity. In addition, they act as major conduits of organic matter from the shallow productive shelf to the food deprived deep-sea, promoting gradients in food resources and areas of sediment resuspension and deposition. This study focuses on...

Robertson, Craig M.; Demopoulos, Amanda; Bourque, Jill; Mienis, Furu; Duineveld, Gerard; Lavaleye, Mark; Koivisto, R.; Brooke, S.; Ross, S.; Rhode, M.; Davies, A.

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Year Published: 2020

GoMAMN Strategic Bird Monitoring Guidelines: Landbirds

Landbirds in the Gulf of Mexico region include an ecologically diverse group of taxa that depend on a wide range of terrestrial habitats and the airspace above them. For the GoMAMN region of the Gulf of Mexico, the Landbird Working Group identified 19 species from 12 families as priorities for monitoring (Table 3.1). In addition, all species that...

Zenzal, Theodore J.; Vermillion, William G.; Ferrato, Jacqueline R.; Randall, Lori A.; Dobbs, Robert Christopher; Baldwin, Heather
Zenzal, T.J., Jr., Vermillion, W.G., Ferrato, J.R., Randall, L.A., Dobbs, R.C., and Baldwin, H.Q., 2020, Chapter 3: GoMAMN Strategic Bird Monitoring Guidelines: Landbirds, in Wilson, R.R., Fournier, A.M.V., Gleason, J.S., Lyons, J.E., and Woodrey, M.S., eds., Strategic Bird Monitoring Guidelines for the Northern Gulf of Mexico. Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station Research Bulletin 1228, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS, p. 25-70, https://gomamn.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/GoMAMN_Report_Final.pdf.

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Year Published: 2020

Carbon stock trends of baldcypress knees along climate gradients of the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley using allometric methods

Carbon stock trends of the knees of Taxodium distichum likely vary across climate gradients of the southeastern United States and contribute an unknown quantity of “teal” carbon to inland freshwater wetlands. Knee metrics (e.g., density, height, biomass) were measured in mixed T. distichum swamps across the Mississippi River Alluvial Valley (MRAV...

Middleton, Beth A.

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Year Published: 2020

Mixed organic and inorganic tapwater exposures and potential effects in greater Chicago area, USA

Safe drinking water at the point of use (tapwater, TW) is a public-health priority. TW exposures and potential human-health concerns of 540 organics and 35 inorganics were assessed in 45 Chicago area United States (US) homes in 2017. No US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) enforceable Maximum Contaminant Level(s) (MCL) were exceeded in any...

Bradley, Paul; Argos, Maria; Kolpin, Dana W.; Meppelink, Shannon M.; Romanok, Kristin; Smalling, Kelly; Focazio, Michael J.; Allen, Joshua M.; Dietze, Julie E.; Devito, Michael J.; Donovan, Ariel; Evans, Nicola; Givens, Carrie E.; Gray, James L.; Higgins, Christopher P.; Hladik, Michelle; Iwanowicz, Luke; Journey, Celeste A.; Lane, Rachael; Laughrey, Zachary; Loftin, Keith A.; McCleskey, R. Blaine; McDonough, Carrie A.; Medlock Kakaley, Elizabeth K; Meyer, Michael T.; Holthouse-Putz, Andrea; Richardson, Susan D; Stark, Alan ; Weis, Christopher P.; Wilson, Vickie S.; Zehraoui, Abderrahman

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Year Published: 2020

Category count models for adaptive management of metapopulations: Case study of an imperiled salamander

Managing spatially structured populations of imperiled species presents many challenges. Spatial structure can make it difficult to predict population responses to potential recovery activities, and learning through experimentation may not be advised if it could harm threatened populations. Adaptive management provides an appealing framework when...

O'Donnell, Katherine; Fackler, Paul L.; Johnson, Fred A.; Bonneau, Mathieu; Martin, Julien; Walls, Susan C.

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Year Published: 2020

Increasing rates of carbon burial in southwest Florida coastal wetlands

Rates of organic carbon (OC) burial in some coastal wetlands appear to be greater in recent years than they were in the past. Possible explanations include ongoing mineralization of older OC or the influence of an unaccounted‐for artefact of the methods used to measure burial rates. Alternatively, the trend may represent real acceleration in OC...

Breithaupt, Joshua L.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Vaughn, Derrick; Sanders, Christian; Radabaugh, Kara; Osland, Michael J.; Feher, Laura C.; Lynch, James C.; Cahoon, Donald R.; Anderson, Gordon H.; Whelan, Kevin R. T.; Rosenheim, Brad E.; Moyer, Ryan P.; Chambers, Lisa

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Year Published: 2020

Simulation of water-management scenarios for the Mississippi Delta

To compare the effectiveness of proposed alternative water-supply scenarios on future water availability in the Mississippi Delta, the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality are collaborating on the update and enhancement of an existing regional groundwater-flow model of the area. Through this collaboration...

Haugh, Connor J.; Killian, Courtney D.; Barlow, Jeannie R. B.
Haugh, C.J., Killian, C.D., and Barlow, J.R.B., 2020, Simulation of water-management scenarios for the Mississippi Delta: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2019–5116, 15 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20195116.

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Year Published: 2020

Modeling soil porewater salinity response to drought in tidal freshwater forested wetlands

There is a growing concern about the adverse effects of saltwater intrusion via tidal rivers, streams and creeks into tidal freshwater forested wetlands (TFFW) due to sea‐level rise (SLR) and intense and extended drought events. However, the magnitude and duration of porewater salinity in exceedance of plant salinity stress threshold (2 practical...

Wang, Hongqing; Krauss, Ken W.; Noe, Gregory B.; Stagg, Camille L.; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Duberstein, Jamie A.; Conner, William H.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

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Year Published: 2020

Final project memorandum: Identifying conservation objectives for the Gulf Coast habitats of the black skimmer and gull-billed tern

Many shorebirds and nearshore waterbirds are of conservation concern across the Gulf of Mexico due to stressors such as human disturbance, predation, and habitat loss and degradation. Conservation and protection of these birds is important for the functioning of healthy ecosystems and for maintaining biodiversity in North America. Consequently,...

Cronin, James P.

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Year Published: 2020

Expert bioblitzes facilitate non-native fish tracking and interagency partnerships

Documenting the distribution and composition of non-native species populations can be challenging, especially when species cross jurisdictional boundaries that require interagency coordination. Herein I report the development of three tools that have been used in Florida over the past seven years to assist with tracking of non-native fishes: 1) an...

Schofield, Pamela J.

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Year Published: 2020

Throughfall reduction x fertilization: Deep soil water usage in a clay rich ultisol under loblolly pine in the Southeast USA

Forests in the Southeast USA are predicted to experience a moderate decrease in precipitation inputs over this century that may result in soil water deficiency during the growing season. The potential impact of a drier climate on the productivity of managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations in the Southeast USA is uncertain. Access to...

Qi, Jiaguo; Markewitz, Daniel M.; McGuire, Mary Ann; Samuelson, Lisa; Ward, Eric

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Year Published: 2020

Multi-region assessment of pharmaceutical exposures and predicted effects in USA wadeable urban-gradient streams

Human-use pharmaceuticals in urban streams link aquatic-ecosystem health to human health. Pharmaceutical mixtures have been widely reported in larger streams due to historical emphasis on wastewater-treatment plant (WWTP) sources, with limited investigation of pharmaceutical exposures and potential effects in smaller headwater streams. In 2014–...

Bradley, Paul; Journey, Celeste A.; Button, Daniel T.; Carlisle, Daren; Huffman, B. J.; Qi, Sharon L.; Romanok, Kristin; Van Metre, Peter C.

Filter Total Items: 497
Close-up of the interface between star coral and black-band disease
August 7, 2010

Star coral, Montastraea faveolata, and black-band disease

Close-up of the interface between polyps of the mountainous star coral, Montastraea faveolata, and black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys. Behind the black band is white coral skeleton remaining after the polyps have died.

star coral with black-band disease
August 7, 2010

Star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, affected by black-band disease

A colony of elliptical star coral, Dichocoenia stokesii, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Symmetrical brain coral affected by black-band disease
August 6, 2010

Symmetrical brain coral affected by black-band disease

A colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Lobed star coral affected by black-band disease
August 4, 2010

Lobed star coral affected by black-band disease

A colony of lobed star coral, Montastraea annularis, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

colony of grooved brain coral, Diploria labyrinthiformis, affected by black-band disease
August 4, 2010

Grooved brain coral affected by black-band disease

A colony of grooved brain coral, Diploria labyrinthiformis, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Bbrain coral, Diploria strigosa, affected by black-band disease
August 4, 2010

Brain coral, Diploria strigosa, affected by black-band disease

A colony of symmetrical brain coral, Diploria strigosa, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

brain coral, Diploria clivosa, affected by black-band disease
August 2, 2010

Brain coral, Diploria clivosa, affected by black-band disease

A colony of knobby brain coral, Diploria clivosa, affected by black-band disease (BBD), Florida Keys.

Sealed parking lot with wear marks from snow plows
July 30, 2010

Sealed parking lot with wear marks from snowplow

Once applied, sealcoat can be abraded by snowplows, as evidence here, or the abrasive action of car tires. Runoff carrying high-PAH sealcoat particles flows into storm drains, where it can be transported to streams and lakes. Runoff from coal-tar-sealcoated pavement contains extremely high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and is toxic to aquatic

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Sealcoated parking lot and storm drain
July 30, 2010

Sealcoated parking lot and storm drain

Runoff from this sealcoated lot will flow into the storm drain, where it will be transported to streams and lakes. Runoff from coal-tar-sealcoated pavement contains extremely high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and is toxic to aquatic life.  Read more

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Sealcoat parking lot adjacent to storm drain
July 29, 2010

Sealcoated lot and adjacent storm drain

Runoff from this sealcoated lot will flow into the storm drain, where it will be transported to streams and lakes. Runoff from coal-tar-sealcoated pavement contains extremely high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and is toxic to aquatic life.  Read more

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Sealcoated parking lot adjacent to sidewalk
July 29, 2010

Sealcoated parking lot

Sealcoated parking lot. Runoff from coal-tar-sealcoated pavement contains extremely high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and is toxic to aquatic life.  Read more here.

Filter Total Items: 399
USGS science for a changing world logo
December 6, 2004

USGS Director Chip Groat is available for interviews on Dec. 6-7. Please call the contact, above. Groat will present Science for Ecosystem Restoration on Mon, Dec. 6 from 2:20-2:50pm.

USGS
December 6, 2004

Hydrologists, biologists, geologists and geographers from the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) will discuss their science at the First National Conference on Ecosystem Restoration (NCER) Dec. 6-10 at the Wyndham Palace in Orlando, Fla.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 18, 2004

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey have surveyed the barrier islands battered by Hurricane Ivan and have prepared unique pre- and post-storm photo pairs showing extreme coastal change. The photos will be posted by 5:00 pm today.

USGS
September 18, 2004

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey have surveyed the barrier islands battered by Hurricane Ivan and have prepared unique pre- and post-storm photo pairs showing extreme coastal change. The photos will be posted by 5:00 pm today.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey alerted state and federal agencies today to the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Maryland due to anticipated heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS
September 16, 2004

The U.S. Geological Survey alerted state and federal agencies today to the increased potential for landslides in the mountainous regions of Georgia, Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio and Maryland due to anticipated heavy rainfall from Hurricane Ivan.

USGS
September 16, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are closely watching the Gulf of Mexico shoreline to understand the impact of Hurricane Ivan. The shoreline in the Gulf is particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of the low elevation, shoreline retreat and subsidence in the Mississippi Delta regions.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 13, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are closely watching the long, thin barrier islands that comprise the Gulf of Mexico coast of west Florida as Hurricane Ivan approaches. These islands are particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of their low elevation. New elevation maps show just how vulnerable.

USGS
September 13, 2004

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are closely watching the long, thin barrier islands that comprise the Gulf of Mexico coast of west Florida as Hurricane Ivan approaches. These islands are particularly vulnerable to storm surge and coastal change during hurricanes because of their low elevation. New elevation maps show just how vulnerable.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 9, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region. Although flooding in the immediate Richmond area receded quickly earlier this week, the city may receive additional heavy rainfall from Frances in coming days. 

USGS
September 3, 2004

Streamgages continue to measure new daily record high flows on waterways along the U.S. eastern seaboard as yet another hurricane promises to deliver more rain to parts of the already soggy region.

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