Unified Interior Regions

Region 4: Mississippi Basin

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 237
Date published: April 25, 2016
Status: Active

Gulf of Mexico Land Loss Change Assessment: A Cooperative Study with the Bureau of Ocean and Energy Management

Eighty-five percent of the coastal wetland loss in the contiguous United States occurs in the Gulf of Mexico. Documenting and understanding the occurrence of this wetland loss will provide for effective planning, mitigation, and restoration activities.

Date published: April 25, 2016
Status: Active

Hyper-Temporal Land Area Change Rates in Coastal Louisiana from 1973 to 2015

This study analyzes changes in the extent of land in coastal Louisiana by using an average of 81 datasets (multiple dates of satellite data from 1973 to 2014) for summarizing land and water areas.

Date published: April 25, 2016
Status: Active

Supporting Large-scale Biological Monitoring and Modeling through Data Management and Visualization: Coastal Information Management System (CIMS)

The Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) and USGS have partnered to utilize the data management and visualization capacities of the Wetland and Aquatic Research Center’s Advanced Application Team to manage, deliver, and visualize the largest biological dataset maintained in coastal Louisiana.

Date published: April 18, 2016
Status: Active

Long-term Trends in Swamp Tree Growth across Drought and Salinity Gradients along the Northern Gulf Coast

This study will examine the potential effects of climate-change-induced sea level rise, drought and water extraction by examining tree growth patterns across the Gulf Coast, specifically targeting long-term research plots available in the North American Baldcypress Swamp Network (NABCSN) and the Suwannee River.

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Mangrove Migration Network

At the poleward marsh-mangrove ecotone, mangrove abundance and coverage is winter temperature-sensitive in that it oscillates in response to the frequency, duration, and/or intensity of extreme winter temperatures. Future winter climate change is expected to facilitate poleward mangrove range expansion at the expense of salt marshes in Texas, Louisiana, and parts of Florida. 

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Incorporating Future Change into Current Conservation Planning: Evaluating Wetland Migration along the Gulf of Mexico under Alternative Sea-Level Rise and Urbanization Scenarios

More than half of contiguous U.S. coastal wetlands are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast. These highly-productive wetlands support many ecosystem goods and services and fish and wildlife habitat. Historically, coastal wetlands have adapted to sea-level changes via lateral and vertical movement on the landscape. As sea levels rise in the future, coastal wetlands will adapt and migrate...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Macroclimatic Controls of Coastal Wetland Ecosystem Structure and Function

At the global-scale, macroclimatic drivers govern ecosystem structure and function in tidal saline wetlands (e.g., salt marshes, mangrove forests, salt flats). However, global reviews and models for these ecosystems typically do not directly include climatic drivers. The objective of this research is to examine and forecast the effects of macroclimatic drivers on wetland ecosystem structure...

Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Mississippi Coastal Improvements Program (MsCIP) - Adaptive Management and Monitoring Planning and Implementation

 The Mississippi barrier islands are dynamic coastal landforms that are the first line of defense between the Gulf of Mexico and the Mississippi mainland coast. These islands are experiencing changes in structure (land area and habitat) and geomorphic processes (erosion and accretion) due to frequent intense storms, relative rise in sea level, and changes in sediment supply. A long-term...

Contacts: Brett A. Patton
Date published: April 17, 2016
Status: Active

Geographical Trends in Ecosystem Function and Biodiversity of Wetlands as a Surrogate for Climate Change

Extreme drought and temperature in the southeastern United States may become more frequent in the future, and any  extreme shifts in climate condition are likely to have effects on wetland ecosystem function. USGS research predicts the effects of climate change by shifts in function and biodiversity across existing  climate gradients in baldcypress swamps. 

Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

Climate Change Effects on Coastal Marsh Foundation Species

Mangrove forests have migrated inland over the past few decades at many locations along the northern Gulf of Mexico coast. This expansion has been attributed to factors associated with climate change, such as increased salinity resulting from sea-level rise and longer intervals between winter freezes, which can kill cold-intolerant mangrove species. 

Date published: April 16, 2016
Status: Active

GIS and Custom Application Support for the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council

The scientists at the Wetland and Aquatic Science Center (WARC) have provided coastal restoration project managers and decision makers with GIS planning, database and custom application capacity since 1992. The scope and complexity of this support has increased over the years and has resulted in the development of a comprehensive geospatial and advanced application teams that provide decision...

Filter Total Items: 4,599
Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Water resources of Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana

Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. In 2014, 364 million gallons per day...

White, Vincent E.
White, V.E., 2020, Water resources of Pointe Coupee Parish, Louisiana: U.S. Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2020–3054, 6 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/fs20203054.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Considerations for incorporating quality control into water quality sampling strategies for the U.S. Geological Survey

This report describes considerations for incorporating routine quality-assessment and quality-control evaluations into U.S. Geological Survey discrete water-sampling programs and projects. U.S. Geological Survey water-data science in 2020 is characterized by robustness, external reproducibility, collaborative large-volume data analysis, and...

Medalie, Laura
Medalie, L., 2020, Considerations for incorporating quality control into water quality sampling strategies for the U.S. Geological Survey: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2020–1109, 5 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20201109.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Quality of data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Network for water years 2013–17

Water samples from 122 sites in the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Network were collected in 2013–17 to document ambient water-quality conditions in surface water of the United States and to determine status and trends of loads and concentrations for nutrients, contaminants, and sediment to estuaries and streams. Quality-control (QC...

Medalie, Laura; Bexfield, Laura M.
Medalie, L., and Bexfield, L.M., 2020, Quality of data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Network for water years 2013–17: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5116, 21 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205116.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Water levels and selected water-quality conditions in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in eastern Arkansas, 2014

In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Arkansas Geological Survey and the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission, determined water-level altitudes in 468 wells in eastern Arkansas and collected water-quality samples from 144 wells. Water-level altitudes were calculated based on the measured depth to water in each well and used...

Rodgers, Kirk D.; Whaling, Amanda R.
Rodgers, K.D., and Whaling, A.R., 2020, Water levels and selected water-quality conditions in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer in eastern Arkansas, 2014: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5123, 22 p., 3 pls., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205123.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

An analysis of streamflow trends in the southern and southeastern US from 1950-2015

In this article, the mean daily streamflow at 139 streamflow-gaging stations (sites) in the southern and southeastern United States are analyzed for spatial and temporal patterns. One hundred and thirty-nine individual time-series of mean daily streamflow were reduced to five aggregated time series of Z scores for clusters of sites with similar...

Rodgers, Kirk D.; Roland II, Victor L.; Hoos, Anne B.; Crowley-Ornelas, Elena; Knight, Rodney

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Predicted pH of groundwater in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial and Claiborne aquifers, south-central United States

Regional aquifers in the Mississippi embayment are the principal sources of water used for public and domestic supply, irrigation, and industrial uses throughout the region. An understanding of how water quality varies spatially, temporally, and with depth are critical aspects to ensuring long-term sustainable use of these resources. A boosted...

Kingsbury, James A.; Knierim, Katherine J.; Haugh, Connor J.
Kingsbury, J.A., Knierim, K.J., and Haugh, C.J., 2020, Predicted pH of groundwater in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial and Claiborne aquifers, South-Central United States: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Map 3465, 1 sheet, https://doi.org/10.3133/sim3465.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Terrestrial ecological risk analysis via dietary exposure at uranium mine sites in the Grand Canyon watershed (Arizona, USA)

The U.S. Department of the Interior recently included uranium (U) on a list of mineral commodities that are considered critical to economic and national security. The uses of U for commercial and residential energy production, defense applications, medical device technologies, and energy generation for space vehicles and satellites are known, but...

Hinck, Jo Ellen; Cleveland, Danielle; Sample, Bradley E.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Stable isotope dynamics of herbivorous reef fishes and their ectoparasites

Acanthurids (surgeonfishes) are an abundant and diverse group of herbivorous fishes on coral reefs. While their contribution to trophic linkages and dynamics in coral reef systems has received considerable attention, the role of linkages involving their parasites has not. As both consumers of fish tissue and prey to microcarnivores, external...

Jenkins, William; Demopoulos, Amanda; Nicholson, Matthew C.; Sikkel, Paul C.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Identifying turbulence features hindering swimming capabilities of grass carp larvae (Ctenopharyngodon idella) through submerged vegetation

Aquatic vegetation can provide habitat and refuge for a variety of species in streams. However, the flow features generated by submerged patches of vegetation can also pose a challenge for fish larvae. We conducted a series of experiments with live grass carp larvae (starting ∼50 h post hatch) in a laboratory racetrack flume, using a submerged...

Tinoco, Rafael O.; Prada, Andres F.; George, Amy E.; Stahlschmidt, Benjamin H.; Jackson, P. Ryan; Chapman, Duane C.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Development and testing of species-specific quantitative PCR assays for environmental DNA applications

New, non-invasive methods for detecting and monitoring species presence are being developed to aid in fisheries and wildlife conservation management. The use of environmental DNA (eDNA) samples for detecting macrobiota is one such group of methods that is rapidly becoming popular and being implemented in national management programs. Here we focus...

Klymus, Katy E.; Ruiz Ramos, Dannise Vannesa; Thompson, Nathan; Richter, Catherine A.

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Council monitoring and assessment program (CMAP): A framework for using the monitoring program inventory to conduct gap assessments for the Gulf of Mexico Region

Executive Summary Under the Resources and Ecosystem Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities, and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act of 2012 (RESTORE Act), the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council (RESTORE Council or Council) is required to report on the progress of funded projects and programs. Systematic monitoring of restoration at...

Bosch, Julie; Burkart, Heidi B; Chivoiu, Bogdan; Clark, Randy; Clement, Chris; Enwright, Nicholas; Giordano, Steve; Jeffrey, Chris; Johnson, Ed; Hart, Rheannon; Hile, Sarah D; Howell, Jacob S; Laurenzano, Claudia; Lee, Michael; McCloskey, Terrance; McTigue, Terry; Meyers, Michelle B; Miller, Katie E; Mize, Scott; Monaco, Mark E.; Owen, Kevin; Rebich, Richard; Rendon, Samuel H.; Robertson, Ali; Sample, Thomas; Sanks, Kelly Marie; Steyer, Gregory; Suir, Kevin; Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Thurman, Hana Rose

Publication Thumbnail
Year Published: 2020

Assessment of burrowing behavior of freshwater juvenile mussels in sediment

Standard laboratory sediment toxicity methods have been adapted for conducting toxicity tests with juvenile freshwater mussels. However, studies looking at juvenile mussel burrowing behavior at the water-sediment interface are limited. Juvenile mussels burrow in sediment for the first 0 to 4 yr of life but also may inhabit the sediment-water...

Kemble, Nile E.; Besser, John M.; Steevens, Jeffery; Hughes, Jamie P.

Filter Total Items: 216
07048490, Town Branch tributary at Highway 16 at Fayetteville, Arkansas
April 25, 2011

Flood at 07048490, Town Branch trib. at Highway 16 Fayetteville, Ark.

Flood of April 25, 2011, at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging station 07048490, Town Branch tributary at Highway 16 at Fayetteville, Arkansas. Photograph by D.M. Wagner, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

Flood at station 07048600, White River near Fayetteville, Arkansas
April 25, 2011

Flood at USGS station 07048600, White River nr. Fayetteville, Arkansas

Flood of April 25, 2011, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07048600, White River near Fayetteville, Arkansas. Photograph by K.M. Hubbs, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

Flood of April 25, 2011, at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging station 07048490, Town Branch tributary at Highway 1
April 4, 2011

Flood of April 25, 2011, Town Branch trib., Hwy 16

Flood of April 25, 2011, at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging station 07048490, Town Branch tributary at Highway 16 at Fayetteville, Arkansas. Photograph by D.M. Wagner, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

SIR 2016–5081

Flood of April 25, 2011, Highway 16 at Fayetteville, Arkansas
April 4, 2011

Flood of April 25, 2011, White River, Ark.

Flood of April 25, 2011, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07048600, White River near Fayetteville, Arkansas. Photograph by K.M. Hubbs, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

SIR 2016–5081

video thumbnail: The Mississippi Embayment - Declining Water Levels in a Shallow Aquifer
December 2, 2010

The Mississippi Embayment - Declining Water Levels in a Shallow Aquifer

The USGS recently constructed a computer model of groundwater in the Mississippi embayment. This model was used to simulate the rise or decline of water level in a shallow aquifer. Water from this shallow aquifer is utilized by the agricultural based economy in the area. In the animation, groundwater levels decline more than 100 feet from 1870 to 2007 in some areas of the

video thumbnail: The Mississippi Embayment - Declining Water Levels in a Deep Aquifer
December 2, 2010

The Mississippi Embayment - Declining Water Levels in a Deep Aquifer

The USGS recently constructed a computer model of groundwater in the Mississippi embayment. This model was used to simulate the rise or decline of water level in a deep aquifer. Water from this deep aquifer is utilized to meet the industrial and public supply needs in the area. In the animation, groundwater levels decline more than 400 feet from 1870 to 2007 in some areas

Little Missouri River near Camp Area C at Albert Pike Recreation Area, Arkansas
September 15, 2010

Little Missouri River near Camp Area C at Albert Pike Recreation Area

Little Missouri River near Camp Area C at Albert Pike Recreation Area, Arkansas (photograph by Daniel M. Wagner, U.S. Geological Survey).

Image: WRP St. Landry Parish, Louisiana
July 12, 2010

WRP St. Landry Parish, Louisiana

Wetlands Reserve Program site in St. Landry Parish, Louisiana.  Changes in a local river resulted in the landowner’s fields flooding on a regular basis. The landowner worked through the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service to restore his fields to their natural wetland state.

Image: Oil Spill Samples Arrive from Louisiana
May 14, 2010

Oil Spill Samples Arrive from Louisiana

On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon Drilling Platform exploded and sank, causing the largest oil spill yet recorded. Samples from the oil spill were collected by Louisiana USGS scientists Greg Swayze and Charlie Demas and sent for analysis in Menlo Park, CA. The Louisiana samples were discovered on several of Louisiana's barrier islands, including Grand Isle, a large

...
Filter Total Items: 255
USGS science for a changing world logo
May 6, 2011

The U.S. Geological Survey is monitoring extremely high floodwaters that caused the Arkansas State Highway and Transportation Department to close a stretch of Interstate 40 near Des Arc, Ark.

Interstate 40 is the primary route between Little Rock and Memphis and is one of the busiest truck routes in the nation.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 2, 2011

U.S. Geological Survey field crews continue to measure historic flooding across most of Arkansas. 

River levels are still rising in parts of the state; many have increased by as much as 15 to 30 feet since heavy rainfall began on April 22. Near real-time river level and streamflow information from 149 USGS Arkansas streamgage locations is available online. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2011

The National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council has issued a new report in which independent experts conclude that current USGS estimates for significant earthquake hazards in the New Madrid Seismic Zone—affecting eight central and eastern U.S states—are based on sound science.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2011

U.S. Geological Survey field crews are measuring all-time record flooding on the Illinois River in Northwestern Arkansas. 

Twelve USGS streamgages in northern Arkansas have measured the highest flood levels ever recorded. Two out of the 12 sites have long-term streamflow records since 1979.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 26, 2011

Heavy rainfall of more than 10 inches during the last 24 hours has caused substantial flooding in parts of Southern Missouri. 

Today, there are 19 U.S. Geological Survey scientists out in the field collecting critical streamflow data, which are vital for protection of life, property and the environment. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 25, 2011

Heavy rainfall of more than 8 inches in northwestern Arkansas has caused substantial flooding in parts of the White River and Arkansas River Basins.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 18, 2011

Nearly 60 small and moderate earthquakes struck Arkansas since Feb. 15, 2011, the most recent a magnitude 4.3 earthquake this morning 37 miles away from Little Rock. Many of the earthquakes are large enough to be felt.

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 9, 2011

Earthquakes pose an ongoing hazard to people, buildings, and infrastructure in St. Louis and surrounding areas.

One of the known sources of large earthquakes in the past is the New Madrid seismic zone.

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 14, 2011

Matthew Andersen has been selected as the Deputy Center Director of the U. S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette, La.

The NWRC develops and disseminates scientific information needed for understanding the ecology and value of the Nation's wetlands and for managing and restoring wetland habitats and associated plant and animal communities. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
January 10, 2011

Large wildlife die-off events are fairly common, though they should never be ignored, according to the U.S. Geological Survey scientists whose preliminary tests showed that the bird deaths in Arkansas on New Year’s Eve and those in Louisiana were caused by impact trauma.

USGS
November 30, 2010

Growing corn for biofuels production is having unintended effects on water quality and quantity in northwestern Mississippi.

USGS
November 23, 2010

Phil Turnipseed has been selected as the Director of the U. S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center in Lafayette, La.