Unified Interior Regions

Region 4: Mississippi Basin

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 237
Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Coastal Wetlands

Wetlands have the potential to absorb large amounts of carbon dioxide via photosynthesis, and flooded soils have low oxygen levels which decrease rates of decomposition to promote the retention of soil carbon. However, the type of greenhouse gases emitted from wetlands varies by wetland type and soil condition. A suite of approaches are being used to assess  fluxes of greenhouses gases, like...

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Modeling Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands (TFFW) Habitat Changes for Land Management

As tidal freshwater forested wetlands - TFFWs - are influenced by salinty due to salt water intrusion, they may experience changes in plant community composition, growth, and productivity. Models are needed to predict vegetation community change or dieback, as well as changes in carbon sequestration and storage due to changing climate, drought, changes in freshwater discharge, elevated carbon...

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Modeling Landscape-Scale Habitat Relations for Landbirds During Migration: Science Support for the Gulf Coast Joint Venture

USGS uses weather surveillance radar data and landscape-scale habitat metrics to model bird-habitat connections along the western coast of the Gulf of Mexico.

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Ecology of Tidal Freshwater Forested Wetlands of the Southeastern United States

Tidal freshwater forested wetlands - TFFWs - can be found in the upper intertidal areas of many estuaries and act as a transition between coastal marshes and bottomland hardwood wetlands. However, it is because of their location that makes them vulnerable to sea-level rise, and they are constantly transitioning to different wetland types. USGS addresses how various processes are affected in...

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Restoration of Climate Change-Induced Retreat of Tidally Influenced Freshwater Forested Wetlands

Wetlands in river deltas - like the Mississippi River Delta Plain - may be more vulnerable to sea-level rise. Historically, coastal wetlands responded to these changes by increasing surface elevation or migrating up-slope. USGS conducts research to identify the biogeochemical influences on sediment addition in coastal wetland areas. 

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

RESTORE Science: Inventory of Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Indicators Using an Ecological Resilience Framework

To effectively manage an ecosystem, resource managers need a way to evaluate its health and ability to function. Metrics that indicate ecosystem condition - or indicators - can be used to help determine how well management strategies work. 

Date published: April 8, 2016
Status: Active

Factors Controlling Resilience and Resistance of Coastal Salt Marshes to Sudden Marsh Dieback

Sudden Marsh Dieback - SMD - has been documented for the past two decades throughout coastal areas of the United States. With these large-scale diebacks comes the loss of ecosystem functions and services. USGS scientsts use field work and greenhouse studies to investigate the factors that control the resilience and resistance of coastal salt marshes to SMD. 

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Integrated Modeling of Coastal Processes and Linkages to Management Applications

Coastal wetlands provide valuable ecosystem services such as wave attenuation, surge reduction, carbon sequestration, wastewater treatment, and critical habitats for endangered fish and wildlife species. However, wetland loss threatens the capacity of coastal wetlands to provide these ecosystem services.

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Louisiana’s Coastwide Reference Monitoring System (CRMS)

The Coastwise Reference Monitoring System was designed to monitor the effectiveness of restoration actions at individual sites, as well as across the entire Louisiana coast. 

Contacts: Sarai Piazza
Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Influence of Sea-Level Rise on Wetland Vegetation Community Structure, Primary Productivity, Organic Matter Decomposition and Carbon Storage

This study will employ a space for time substitution to show long-term effects of rising sea-level and increasing salinity on vegetation community structure, primary production and decomposition. Productivity and decomposition rates will be estimated for four wetland plant community types defined by salinity zones and dominant plant species. 

Date published: April 7, 2016
Status: Active

Surface Elevation Vulnerability of Coastal Forested Wetlands to Sea-Level Rise

Wetlands vary in their abilities to keep up with sea-level rise; they either adjust vertically and/or move inland. USGS is working with partners around the world to measure rates of surface elevation change relative to local sea-level rise. 

Date published: April 6, 2016

Soil Properties and Geochronology in Barataria Basin, Louisiana

Will wetland vertical accretion rates be enough to keep up with the predicted rates of sea level rise? USGS looks at soil properties and geochronology in Louisiana wetlands. 

Filter Total Items: 4,509
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Year Published: 2020

Comparing trends in modeled and observed streamflows at minimally altered basins in the United States

We compared modeled and observed streamflow trends from 1984–2016 using five statistical transfer models and one deterministic, distributed-parameter, process-based model, for 26 flow metrics at 502 basins in the United States that are minimally influenced by development. We also looked at a measure of overall model fit and average bias. A higher...

Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Dudley, Robert; Russell, Amy M.; LaFontaine, Jacob H.

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Year Published: 2020

Updating data inputs, assessing trends, and evaluating a method to estimate probable high groundwater levels in selected areas of Massachusetts

A method to estimate the probable high groundwater level in Massachusetts, excluding Cape Cod and the islands, was developed in 1981. The method uses a groundwater measurement from a test site, groundwater measurements from an index well, and a distribution of high groundwater levels from wells in similar geologic and topographic settings. The U.S...

Barclay, Janet R.; Mullaney, John R.
Barclay, J.R., and Mullaney, J.R., 2020, Updating data inputs, assessing trends, and evaluating a method to estimate probable high groundwater levels in selected areas of Massachusetts: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2020–5036, 45 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/sir20205036.

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Year Published: 2020

Effects of barrier island salt marsh restoration on marsh bird occurrence in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

In the Northern Gulf of Mexico, salt marshes are threatened by sea level rise, erosion, and loss of protective barrier islands. These barrier islands provide critical habitat for wildlife, including globally significant populations of marsh and shorebirds. We investigated salt marsh restoration on two Louisiana barrier islands using presence of 8...

Byerly, Paige A.; Waddle, Hardin; Premeaux, Alexis R.; Leberg, Paul L.

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Year Published: 2020

Proposed species extinction target fails to capture the diversity in biodiversity

We believe the 20 species extinction metric is a retrograde proposal, which does not adequately consider the lessons learnt from the 2020 Aichi Biodiversity Targets. Whilst having a single simple overarching target is appealing, we believe a positively-framed target will garner support, rather than one that aims to, at best, limit negative impacts...

O'Brien, David; Hunter, Margaret; Breed, Martin; Bertola, Laura; Ogden, Rob; Palma da Silva, Clarisse; Paz-Vinas, Ivan; Segelbacher, Gernot; Hoban, Sean M.; Jaffe, Rodolfo

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Year Published: 2020

Comparison of SELDM simulated total-phosphorus concentrations with ecological impervious-area criteria

Ecological studies indicate that impervious cover (IC) greater than approximately 5%–20% may have adverse effects on receiving-stream ecology. It is difficult to separate the effects of runoff quality from other effects of urbanization on receiving streams. This study presents the results of a numerical experiment to assess the effects of...

Jeznach, Lillian C.; Granato, Gregory E.

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Year Published: 2020

Characterizing the diverse hydrogeology underlying rivers and estuaries using new floating transient electromagnetic methodology

The hydrogeology below large surface water features such as rivers and estuaries is universally under-informed at the long reach to basin scales (tens of km+). This challenge inhibits the accurate modeling of fresh/saline groundwater interfaces and groundwater/surface water exchange patterns at management-relevant spatial extents. Here we...

Lane, John W.; Briggs, Martin; Maurya, PK; White, Eric A.; Pedersen, JB; Auken, Esben; Terry, Neil; Minsley, Burke J; Kress, Wade; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Adams, Ryan F.; Johnson, Carole D.

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Year Published: 2020

Acris blanchardi (Blanchard's Cricket Frog), Predation

Invertebrates are well-known predators of amphibians with many documented cases of spiders preying upon anurans (reviewed in Toledo 2005. Herpetol. Rev. 36:395–400). Wolf spiders are known to feed on a variety of frogs, including those in the genus Acris (Blackburn et al. 2002. Herpetol. Rev. 33:299). Although typically terrestrial, wolf spiders...

Maldonado, Brittany R.; Glorioso, Brad; Kidder, Raymond P.

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Year Published: 2020

Low-level detection of SFD-causing Ophidiomyces on Burmese Pythons in southwest Florida, with confirmation of the pathogen on co-occurring native snakes

Snake fungal disease (SFD), or ophidiomycosis, is caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola (Allender et al. 2015; Lorch et al. 2015). SFD is widespread across wild populations in the eastern United States (Lorch et al. 2016) and is known to infect more than 30 species of snake in North America and Europe (Lorch et al. 2016; Franklinos et al...

Glorioso, Brad; Bartoszek, Ian A.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.

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Year Published: 2020

Analysis of movement recursions to detect reproductive events and estimate their fate in central place foragers

Recursive movement patterns have been used to detect behavioral structure within individual movement trajectories in the context of foraging ecology, home-ranging behavior, and predator avoidance. Some animals exhibit movement recursions to locations that are tied to reproductive functions, including nests and dens; while existing literature...

Picardi, Simona; Smith, Brian; Boone, Matthew E.; Frederick, Peter C.; Cecere, Jacopo G.; Rubolini, Diego; Serra, Lorenzo; Pirrello, Simone; Borkhataria, Rena R.; Basille, Mathieu

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Year Published: 2020

Oases of the future? Evaluating springs as potential hydrologic refugia in drying climates

Springs in water-limited landscapes are biodiversity hotspots and keystone ecosystems, disproportionately influencing surrounding landscapes despite their often small areas. Some springs served as evolutionary refugia during previous climate drying, supporting relict species in isolated habitats. Understanding whether springs will provide...

Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Dwire, Kathleen A.; Freed, Zach; Hammer, Samantha J.; McLaughlin, Blair; Misztal, Louise W.; Schenk, Edward J.; Spencer, John R.; Springer, Abraham E.; Stevens, Lawrence E.

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Year Published: 2020

Combining physical and species‐based approaches improves refugia identification

Climate‐change refugia – locations likely to facilitate species persistence under climate change – are increasingly important components of conservation planning. Recent approaches for identifying refugia at broad scales include identifying regions that are projected to experience less severe changes (climatic exposure), that contain a diversity...

Michalak, Julia; Stralberg, Diana; Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Lawler, Joshua J.

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Year Published: 2020

Disturbance refugia within mosaics of forest fire, drought, and insect outbreaks

Disturbance refugia – locations that experience less severe or frequent disturbances than the surrounding landscape – provide a framework to highlight not only where and why these biological legacies persist as adjacent areas change but also the value of those legacies in sustaining biodiversity. Recent studies of disturbance refugia in forest...

Krawchuk, Meg A.; Meigs, Garrett; Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Coop, Jonathan D.; Davis, Raymond J.; Holz, Andres; Kolden, Crystal A.; Meddens, Arjan J.H.

Filter Total Items: 221
video thumbnail: Effects of Sea-Level Rise on Coastal Wetlands in the Mississippi Delta
March 30, 2009

Effects of Sea-Level Rise on Coastal Wetlands in the Mississippi Delta

This video describes research being conducted by Dr. Karen McKee, USGS Research Ecologist, and her university partner, Dr. Julia Cherry. Their goal is to better understand the effects of sea-level rise and other global change factors on coastal wetlands in the Mississippi River Delta. This region contains over 40% of the U.S. wetlands in the lower 48 states These wetlands

video thumbnail: Simulated groundwater declines in Central Arkansas
January 6, 2009

Simulated groundwater declines in Central Arkansas

A groundwater-flow model of the Mississippi embayment was used to evaluate changes in water-level altitudes after the addition of wells that simulate potential future pumping from the Sparta aquifer in the Bayou Meto-Grand Prairie area of eastern Arkansas (shown within the black outline) for the 30-year period from 2007 through 2037. The animation portrays the time-lapse

video thumbnail: The Mississippi embayment — Where Does the Water Come From?
January 6, 2009

The Mississippi embayment — Where Does the Water Come From?

As the animation begins, the land surface of the Mississippi embayment fades away to reveal underground geologic formations (shown as shades of blue, brown, and gray surfaces). A slice deep into the earth cuts off the eastern half of the embayment so we can peer into the formations (aquifers) beneath the surface. The lower portion of different colored water wells (orange,

video thumbnail: The Mississippi embayment — a look underground
December 11, 2008

The Mississippi embayment — a look underground

Water, oil, and gas wells (shown as green lines) are drilled to hundreds or thousands of feet below land surface in an area known as the Mississippi embayment. Information gathered from these wells was used to create a 3D computer model of underground formations. Many of these formations (shown as shades of grey, blue, brown, or tan surfaces) consist of layers of sand and

Image: WRP Morehouse Parish, Louisiana
November 14, 2008

WRP Morehouse Parish, Louisiana

Wetlands Reserve Program site in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana.  Green tree frogs rest on a Wetlands Reserve Program easement boundary sign in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana.

Midwest farm landscape
September 19, 2008

Farm in Iowa with silos

This farm in Iowa sits amid a field of corn.  USGS researches the effects of agricultural use of fertilizers, pesticides, and other chemicals on surface-water and groundwater quality.

Farm in Iowa in morning mist
September 19, 2008

Farm in Iowa in morning mist amid cornfield

Iowa farm in a cornfield in the early morning mist.  USGS research investigates the effects of agricultural use of fertilizers, pesticides, and other chemicals in the quality of surface water and groundwater.

Flood of March 19, 2008, Buffalo River near St. Joe, Ark.
March 19, 2008

Flood of March 19, 2008 at Buffalo River, Ark.

B.K. Martin, hydrologic technician in the Little Rock office of the USGS Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, measuring streamflow with an acoustic doppler current profiler during flood of March 19, 2008, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07056000, Buffalo River near St. Joe, Arkansas. Photograph by W.E. Baldwin, USGS Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

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USGS streamflow-gaging station 07056000, Buffalo River near St. Joe, Arkansas
March 19, 2008

Measuring streamflow with an acoustic doppler current profiler

B.K. Martin, hydrologic technician in the Little Rock office of the USGS Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center, measuring streamflow with an acoustic doppler current profiler during flood of March 19, 2008, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07056000, Buffalo River near St. Joe, Arkansas. Photograph by W.E. Baldwin, USGS Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

Flood at White River at Calico Rock, Arkansas
March 19, 2008

White River at Calico Rock, Arkansas, during flood of March 19, 2008

White River at Calico Rock, Arkansas, during flood of March 19, 2008. Photograph by Daniel M. Wagner, U.S. Geological Survey.

Filter Total Items: 253
USGS
August 29, 2008

Real-time flooding and storm surge information is available as Tropical Storm Gustav approaches the Gulf Coast by visiting the interactive US Geological Survey (USGS) Water Hazards Map.

USGS
August 28, 2008

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists will be installing rapidly-deployable mobile gages and storm-surge sensors to prepare for Tropical Storm Gustav.

USGS
June 12, 2008

Today the U.S. Geological Survey is installing a temporary streamgage in downtown Cedar Rapids until the permanent streamgage can be restored. Transmission of the information from the streamgage was abruptly interrupted last night when power to the downtown Cedar Rapids area was cut off because of safety concerns due to the flooding and the backup system failed. 

USGS
May 1, 2008

The largest flood on the lower Mississippi River since 1973 was measured on April 22 in Vicksburg, Mississippi by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

USGS
April 21, 2008

Partners in the Sparta Aquifer Recovery Initiative in southern Arkansas and northern Louisiana were recognized with the Department of the Interior's Cooperative Conservation Award today.

USGS
January 29, 2008

Nine states in the Mississippi River Basin contribute the majority of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico, threatening the economic and ecological health of one of the nation's largest and most productive fisheries.

USGS
January 24, 2008

The overabundance of nutrients in the Gulf has resulted in a zone of low dissolved oxygen, or hypoxia, which can cause stress and death in bottom-dwelling organisms, threatening the economic and ecological health of the one of the nation's most productive fisheries.

USGS
June 25, 2007

Watch history in action as U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists share the secrets of sampling for metals in water with the Indian Tribes from Oklahoma, New Mexico, Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Region VI.

USGS
March 30, 2007

The U.S. Geological Survey released a report today that presents information on streamflow and nutrient delivery from the Mississippi River Basin to the northern Gulf of Mexico. Scientists have linked the delivery of nutrients and streamflow to the formation and extent of a “hypoxic zone”

USGS
October 12, 2006

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) released new data that illustrate the arrival of the massive dome of flood water that inundated much of southwest coastal Louisiana just before, during and after landfall of Hurricane Rita last fall.