Unified Interior Regions

Region 4: Mississippi Basin

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Year Published: 2020

Comparison of SELDM simulated total-phosphorus concentrations with ecological impervious-area criteria

Ecological studies indicate that impervious cover (IC) greater than approximately 5%–20% may have adverse effects on receiving-stream ecology. It is difficult to separate the effects of runoff quality from other effects of urbanization on receiving streams. This study presents the results of a numerical experiment to assess the effects of...

Jeznach, Lillian C.; Granato, Gregory E.

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Year Published: 2020

Characterizing the diverse hydrogeology underlying rivers and estuaries using new floating transient electromagnetic methodology

The hydrogeology below large surface water features such as rivers and estuaries is universally under-informed at the long reach to basin scales (tens of km+). This challenge inhibits the accurate modeling of fresh/saline groundwater interfaces and groundwater/surface water exchange patterns at management-relevant spatial extents. Here we...

Lane, John W.; Briggs, Martin; Maurya, PK; White, Eric A.; Pedersen, JB; Auken, Esben; Terry, Neil; Minsley, Burke J; Kress, Wade; LeBlanc, Denis R.; Adams, Ryan F.; Johnson, Carole D.

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Year Published: 2020

Acris blanchardi (Blanchard's Cricket Frog), Predation

Invertebrates are well-known predators of amphibians with many documented cases of spiders preying upon anurans (reviewed in Toledo 2005. Herpetol. Rev. 36:395–400). Wolf spiders are known to feed on a variety of frogs, including those in the genus Acris (Blackburn et al. 2002. Herpetol. Rev. 33:299). Although typically terrestrial, wolf spiders...

Maldonado, Brittany R.; Glorioso, Brad; Kidder, Raymond P.

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Year Published: 2020

Low-level detection of SFD-causing Ophidiomyces on Burmese Pythons in southwest Florida, with confirmation of the pathogen on co-occurring native snakes

Snake fungal disease (SFD), or ophidiomycosis, is caused by the fungus Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola (Allender et al. 2015; Lorch et al. 2015). SFD is widespread across wild populations in the eastern United States (Lorch et al. 2016) and is known to infect more than 30 species of snake in North America and Europe (Lorch et al. 2016; Franklinos et al...

Glorioso, Brad; Bartoszek, Ian A.; Lorch, Jeffrey M.

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Year Published: 2020

Analysis of movement recursions to detect reproductive events and estimate their fate in central place foragers

Recursive movement patterns have been used to detect behavioral structure within individual movement trajectories in the context of foraging ecology, home-ranging behavior, and predator avoidance. Some animals exhibit movement recursions to locations that are tied to reproductive functions, including nests and dens; while existing literature...

Picardi, Simona; Smith, Brian; Boone, Matthew E.; Frederick, Peter C.; Cecere, Jacopo G.; Rubolini, Diego; Serra, Lorenzo; Pirrello, Simone; Borkhataria, Rena R.; Basille, Mathieu

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Year Published: 2020

Oases of the future? Evaluating springs as potential hydrologic refugia in drying climates

Springs in water-limited landscapes are biodiversity hotspots and keystone ecosystems, disproportionately influencing surrounding landscapes despite their often small areas. Some springs served as evolutionary refugia during previous climate drying, supporting relict species in isolated habitats. Understanding whether springs will provide...

Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Dwire, Kathleen A.; Freed, Zach; Hammer, Samantha J.; McLaughlin, Blair; Misztal, Louise W.; Schenk, Edward J.; Spencer, John R.; Springer, Abraham E.; Stevens, Lawrence E.

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Year Published: 2020

Combining physical and species‐based approaches improves refugia identification

Climate‐change refugia – locations likely to facilitate species persistence under climate change – are increasingly important components of conservation planning. Recent approaches for identifying refugia at broad scales include identifying regions that are projected to experience less severe changes (climatic exposure), that contain a diversity...

Michalak, Julia; Stralberg, Diana; Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Lawler, Joshua J.

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Year Published: 2020

Disturbance refugia within mosaics of forest fire, drought, and insect outbreaks

Disturbance refugia – locations that experience less severe or frequent disturbances than the surrounding landscape – provide a framework to highlight not only where and why these biological legacies persist as adjacent areas change but also the value of those legacies in sustaining biodiversity. Recent studies of disturbance refugia in forest...

Krawchuk, Meg A.; Meigs, Garrett; Cartwright, Jennifer M.; Coop, Jonathan D.; Davis, Raymond J.; Holz, Andres; Kolden, Crystal A.; Meddens, Arjan J.H.

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Year Published: 2020

Methods of collection and quality assessment of arsenic data in well-water supplies in Maine, 2001–2 and 2006–7

The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention, assessed the chemical characteristics and the occurrence, distribution, and oxidation state of inorganic arsenic in drinking water from selected domestic well-water supplies in Maine in 2001–2...

Culbertson, Charles W.; Caldwell, James M.; Schalk, Luther F.; Manassaram, Deana; Backer, Lorraine C.; Smith, Andrew E.
Culbertson, C.W., Caldwell, J.M., Schalk, L.F., Manassaram, D., Backer, L.C., and Smith, A.E., 2020, Methods of collection and quality assessment of arsenic data in well-water supplies in Maine, 2001–2 and 2006–7: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 1125, 11 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ds1125.

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Year Published: 2020

Scaling responses of leaf nutrient stoichiometry to the lakeshore flooding duration gradient across different organizational levels

Most wetlands have been subject to changes in flooding regimes by climate change and human activities, resulting in widespread alteration of wetland plants at different organizational levels. However, scaling the responses of wetland plants to changes in flooding regimes is still challenging, because flooding could indirectly affect wetland plants...

Chen, Yasong; Stagg, Camille; Cai, Yongjiu; Lü, Xiaotao; Wang, Xiaolong; Shen, Ruichang; Lan, Zhichun

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Year Published: 2020

A tropical cyclone-induced ecological regime shift: Mangrove forest conversion to mudflat in Everglades National Park (Florida, USA)

The ecological effects of tropical cyclones on mangrove forests are diverse and highly location- and cyclone-dependent. Ecological resistance, resilience, and enhancement are terms that describe most mangrove forest responses to tropical cyclones. However, in the most extreme cases, tropical cyclones can trigger abrupt and irreversible ecological...

Osland, Michael; Feher, Laura; Anderson, Gordon; Vervaeke, William; Krauss, Ken; Whelan, Kevin R.T.; Balentine, Karen S.; Tiling-Range, G.; Smith, Thomas J.; Cahoon, Donald

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Year Published: 2020

Developmental ecomorphology of the epibranchial organ of the silver carp, Hypophthalmichthys molitrix

Silver carp regularly consume and digest particles of food as small as 5 μm. This ability drives their efficient consumption of phytoplankton and because they feed low on the food chain they have an important place in aquaculture worldwide. In North America, where they are considered invasive, silver carp deplete food resources for native species...

Cohen, Karly E.; George, Amy E.; Chapman, Duane C.; Chick, John H.; Hernandez, L. Patricia

Filter Total Items: 255
USGS
November 1, 1999

More than 100 scientists will converge on the Cajundome in Lafayette, La., Nov. 2-4 to share the latest technologies used in studying everything from hurricanes in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico to grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park. They are participants in the U.S. Geological Survey’s symposium, "BioGeo99: Applications of Geospatial Technology to Biological Sciences."

USGS
September 17, 1999

Wildfires have long played a key role in structuring ecosystems and plant communities in the southeastern United States. From the coastal prairie of Texas and Louisiana to the marshes and pinelands of Florida, many native species have adapted to a natural regime of frequent wildfire caused by lightning strikes.

USGS
April 26, 1999

Gaye S. Farris of Carencro, La., is the new national secretary of the National Association of Government Communicators, a national professional network of federal, state and local government employees who disseminate information within and outside government.

USGS
April 1, 1999

From the drastic impacts of major floods and droughts to more gradual shifts in channel, sandbar and floodplain habitats, large river systems such as the Missouri are always changing. Over the past century human activities also have caused physical and biological changes in such rivers.

USGS
March 29, 1999

The mysterious brain disease responsible for the deaths of bald eagles and American coots in Arkansas has now been found in two species of ducks discovered dead at Woodlake, North Carolina, and in bald eagles and coots from three other southeastern states.

USGS
January 21, 1999

Nutrients from the Mississippi River Basin are believed to be responsible, at least in part, for the large hypoxic zone that develops on the Louisiana-Texas shelf in the Gulf of Mexico each summer, according to Don Goolsby, a hydrologist with the U.S.Geological Survey in Denver, Colo.

USGS
October 15, 1998

Effective immediately, the Environmental and Contaminants Research Center, an environmental research facility of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Biological Resources Division (Central Region) located in Columbia, MO, was re-named the Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC).

USGS
October 2, 1998

Heavy rainfall and flooding prompted an emergency response from USGS (U.S. Geological Survey) engineers and field technicians to keep stream gages operational during and after Hurricane Georges. Personnel from Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida are working to secure gages threatened by rising rivers and streams or damaged by the storm. Some gaging stations monitored by the USGS are used

USGS
October 1, 1998

Aerial flights on Tuesday, two days after Hurricane Georges hit the Mississippi Gulf Coast, revealed what one scientist called the worst damage to the Chandeleur Islands that he had seen in more than a decade.

USGS
October 1, 1998

Hurricane Georges extensively damaged the Chandeleur Islands, barrier islands approximately 60 miles east of New Orleans and 30 miles south of Biloxi, Mississippi. These islands are the first line of storm defense for eastern Louisiana, especially New Orleans, and western Mississippi.

USGS
December 16, 1997

A mysterious disease that has killed bald eagles and American coots in southwest Arkansas may now be present in two other states, according to wildlife disease specialists at the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisconsin.

USGS
September 17, 1997

A minor earthquake with a magnitude of 3.8 occurred near Jonesboro, Ark., early Wednesday afternoon (September 17), according to scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey in Golden, Colo.