Unified Interior Regions

Region 4: Mississippi Basin

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Filter Total Items: 239
Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

Using Quantile Regression to Investigate Ecological Limiting Factors

Unexplained heterogeneity in statistical models of animal responses to their physical environment is reasonable to expect because the measured habitat resources are a constraint on—but not the sole determinant of—abundance, survival, fecundity, or fitness. The ecological understanding and reliability of management predictions based on animal habitat models can be improved by shifting focus ...

Date published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

North American Waterfowl Management Plan

The ultimate success of North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) depends on maintaining relevance to stakeholders and society. In order to be relevant, a first step is to better understand what people value in regard to waterfowl and their habitats. 

Date published: July 19, 2016
Status: Completed

Quantitative and Statistical Research Collaboration

Mathematical and statistical models are powerful research tools that play several important roles in conceptualizing and understanding the structure and dynamics of complicated ecological systems, including developing mechanistic hypotheses pertaining to ecological systems, designing studies that elucidate ecosystem structure and function, and extracting information from data.

Date published: June 22, 2016
Status: Active

Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and Restoration Act (CWPPRA) Outreach Program

CWPPRA outreach staff at WARC leads an outreach effort that educates and inspires a variety of audiences about Louisiana’s wetlands, land loss, and the CWPPRA wetland restoration program.

Contacts: Kathy Ladner
Date published: June 22, 2016

Status and Trends of Emergent Wetlands in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: 1950-2010

Throughout the past century, emergent wetlands have been declining across the Gulf of Mexico. Emergent wetland ecosystems provide a plethora of resources including plant and wildlife habitat, commercial and recreational economic activity, water quality, and natural barriers against storms.

Contacts: Kathryn Spear
Date published: June 2, 2016
Status: Active

A Climate Change Adaptation Plan in Response to Sea Level Rise for the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana

This project will create a Climate Change Adaptation Plan for the Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana (Chitimacha), serving as an implementable plan for coastal community adaptation to climate change that can be used as a model in other small communities.

Contacts: Kathryn Spear
Date published: May 26, 2016

Mapping Marsh Structure with Polarimetric Radar: Highlighting Change in Oil Spill Impacted Marshes

While the historic focus of vegetation condition is the bulk live and dead compositions, these variables provide no information on the structure of vegetation (density and orientation). Canopy structure information is critical for monitoring status and trends, and essential in climate, weather, and ecological studies.

Date published: May 11, 2016
Status: Active

Rate and Process of Mangrove Forest Expansion on Carbon Relations in Coastal Louisiana

Field observations over recent decades have confirmed mangrove expansion landward in tropical zones and poleward in temperate saltmarsh settings around the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Date published: May 9, 2016
Status: Active

Supporting River and Delta Science through Data Management and Visualization

Mississippi River Hydrodynamic and Delta Management Study (MRHDMS)is the first large-scale, long-term restoration assessment initiated under the Louisiana Coastal Area (LCA) Program.

Date published: May 6, 2016

Two Hundred Years of Forest Change in the Tensas River Basin

Prescriptions in the forest habitat management plan for Tensas River National Wildlife Refuge are designed to produce a forest once represented in the Tensas Basin. There are several problems with reconstructing original forests. In most areas, conditions have changed since these forests were cut; particularly, hydrology, soils, and climatic conditions.

Date published: May 4, 2016
Status: Completed

GIS Support and Spatial Analysis Support for the Louisiana Division of Administration, State Land Office

The Wetland and Aquatic Research Center (WARC) first implemented geographic information systems (GIS) in 1980 to assist in monitoring the nature and extent of wetland habitat changes. The geospatial capabilities at the Coastal Restoration Assessment Branch (CRAB), in part, grew out of that initial effort and now use GIS, remote sensing, and other computer based technologies to address a wide...

Date published: May 3, 2016
Status: Active

Structured Decision-Making to Facilitate Multi-Stakeholder Coastal Conservation and Restoration under Climate Change Uncertainties: Case Study on Barrier Island of the Northern Gulf of Mexico

Barrier island resource managers within the northern Gulf of Mexico have the opportunity to more directly incorporate scientific uncertainties and technological challenges inherent with large-scale barrier island restoration projects, and as such, commit to developing robust long-term monitoring programs and applying adaptive management.

Filter Total Items: 4,622
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Year Published: 2021

Identifying information gaps in predicting winter foraging habitat for juvenile Gulf Sturgeon

The Gulf Sturgeon Acipenser oxyrinchus desotoi is an anadromous species that inhabits Gulf of Mexico coastal waters from Louisiana to Florida and is listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Seasonal cues (e.g., freshwater discharge) determine the timing of spawning and migration and may influence the availability of...

Dale, Leah L; Cronin, James P.; Brink, Virginia; Tirpak, Blair; Tirpak, John M.; Pine, William E.

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Year Published: 2021

Strategic habitat conservation for beach mice: Estimating management scenario efficiencies

The Perdido Key beach mouse (Peromyscus polionotus trissyllepsis), Choctawhatchee beach mouse (P. p. allophrys), and St. Andrew beach mouse (P. p. peninsularis) are 3 federally endangered subspecies that inhabit coastal dunes of Alabama and Florida, USA. Conservation opportunities for these subspecies are limited and costly. Consequently, well‐...

Cronin, James P.; Tirpak, Blair; Dale, Leah L; Robenski, Virginia E; Tirpak, John M.; Marcot, Bruce G.

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Year Published: 2021

Effective population size remains a suitable, pragmatic indicator of genetic diversity for all species, including forest trees

Fady & Bozzano highlight some challenges to a proposed Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) indicator of genetic diversity based on effective population size, Ne (Fady and Bozzano, 2020; Hoban et al., 2020). We appreciate the thoughtful debate and concur that genetic diversity indicators must be reliable and scalable. We fully agree...

Hoban, Sean M.; Paz-Vinas, Ivan; Aitken, Sally; Bertola, Laura D.; Breed, Martin F; Bruford, Michael W.; Funk, W. Chris; Grueber, Catherine E.; Heuertz, Myriam; Hohenlohe, Paul A.; Hunter, Margaret; Jaffé, Rodolfo; Lopes Fernandes, Margarida; Mergeay, Joachim; Moharrek, Farideh; O’Brien, David; Segelbacher, Gernot; Vernesi, Cristiano; Waits, Lisette; Laikre, Linda

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Year Published: 2021

Seasonal periphyton response to low-level nutrient exposure in a least disturbed mountain stream, the Buffalo River, Arkansas

Like most streams located in the Ozark Plateaus, the Buffalo River in Arkansas generally has excellent water quality. Water-quality conditions in Big Creek, however, a major tributary of the middle Buffalo River, have been less favorable than that of other Buffalo River tributaries. Concerns regarding the influence of water quality in Big Creek on...

Justus, Billy; Driver, Lucas; Burge, David R. L.

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Year Published: 2021

The impact of ventilation patterns on calcite dissolution rates within karst conduits

Erosion rates in streams vary dramatically over time, as differences in streamflow and sediment load enhance or inhibit erosion processes. Within cave streams, and other bedrock channels incising soluble rocks, changes in water chemistry are an important factor in determining how erosion rates will vary in both time and space. Prior studies in...

Covington, Matthew D.; Knierim, Katherine J.; Young, Holly H; Rodriguez, Josue; Gnoza, Hannah

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Year Published: 2021

Metabarcoding assays for the detection of freshwater mussels (Unionida) with environmental DNA

Freshwater mussels of the order Unionida are a widely distributed taxon that are important in maintaining freshwater ecosystems and are also highly imperiled throughout the world. Monitoring of mussel populations with environmental DNA (eDNA) is an attractive alternative to traditional methods because it is noninvasive and requires less labor and...

Klymus, Katy E.; Richter, Catherine A.; Thompson, Nathan; Hinck, Jo Ellen; Jones, Jess W.

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Year Published: 2021

Small mammal responses to wetland restoration in the Greater Everglades ecosystem

Wetlands have experienced dramatic losses in extent around the world, disrupting ecosystem function, habitat, and biodiversity. In Florida’s Greater Everglades, a massive restoration effort costing billions of dollars and spanning multiple decades is underway. As Everglades restoration is implemented in incremental projects, scientists and...

Romanach, Stephanie; D'Acunto, Laura; Chapman, Julia; Hanson, Matthew R

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Year Published: 2021

A comparison of plant communities in restored, old field, and remnant coastal prairies

Temperate grasslands are experiencing worldwide declines due to habitat conversion. Grassland restoration efforts are employed to compensate for these losses. However, there is a need to better understand the ecological effects of grassland restoration and management practices. We investigated the effects of three different grassland management...

Feher, Laura; Allain, Larry; Osland, Michael; Pigott, Elisabeth; Reid, Christopher; Latiolais, Nicholas

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Year Published: 2021

Sediment dynamics of a divergent bay–marsh complex

Bay–marsh systems, composed of an embayment surrounded by fringing marsh incised by tidal channels, are widely distributed coastal environments. External sediment availability, marsh-edge erosion, and sea-level rise acting on such bay–marsh complexes may drive diverse sediment-flux regimes. These factors reinforce the ephemeral and dynamic nature...

Nowacki, Daniel J. ; Ganju, Neil Kamal

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Year Published: 2021

Stress gradients interact with disturbance to reveal alternative states in salt marsh: Multivariate resilience at the landscape scale

Stress gradients influence many ecosystem processes and properties, including ecosystem recovery from and resistance to disturbance. While recent analytical approaches have advanced multivariate metrics of ecosystem resilience that allow quantification of conceptual resilience models and identification of thresholds of state change, these...

Jones, Scott; Stagg, Camille; Yando, Erik S.; James, W. Ryan; Buffington, Kevin J.; Hester, Mark W.

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Year Published: 2021

Germination potential of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) swamp soil seed bank along geographical gradients

Changing environments of temperature, precipitation and moisture availability can affect vegetation in ecosystems, by affecting regeneration from the seed bank. Our objective was to explore the responses of soil seed bank germination to climate-related environments along geographic gradients. We collected seed banks in baldcypress (Taxodium...

Lei, Ting; Middleton, Beth

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Year Published: 2021

Carrying capacity of spatially distributed metapopulations

Carrying capacity is a key concept in ecology. A body of theory, based on the logistic equation, has extended predictions of carrying capacity to spatially distributed, dispersing populations. However, this theory has only recently been tested empirically. The experimental results disagree with some theoretical predictions of when they are...

Zhang, Bo; DeAngelis, Don; Ni, Wei-Ming

Filter Total Items: 216
Image: USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana
May 12, 2011

USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana

A traveling USGS water quality lab.

Image: USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana
May 12, 2011

USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana

USGS scientists Paul Frederick and Mike Descant take streamflow measurements on the the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, La.

Image: USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana
May 12, 2011

USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana

USGS scientist Paul Frederick manually checks the water levels near a streamgage on the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, La.

Image: USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana
May 12, 2011

USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana

USGS scientist Paul Frederick checks a streamgage on the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, La.

Image: USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana
May 12, 2011

USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana

A USGS streamgage can be seen on the side of the Mississippi River in Baton Rouge, La.

Image: USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana
May 12, 2011

USGS Measures Flooding in Louisiana

Floodwaters rise in Baton Rouge, La.

USGS Louisiana Water Science Center (LA WSC) crew on a flooded road
May 8, 2011

USGS Louisiana Water Science Center (LA WSC) crew on a flooded road

USGS Louisiana Water Science Center (LA WSC) crew on a flooded road

Measuring discharge below the New Madrid Floodway breach
May 3, 2011

Measuring discharge below the New Madrid Floodway breach

Measuring discharge below the New Madrid Floodway breach

USGS streamflow-gaging station 07069000, Black River at Pocahontas, Arkansas
May 3, 2011

Flood at USGS station 07069000, Black River at Pocahontas, Ark.

Flood of May 3, 2011, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07069000, Black River at Pocahontas, Arkansas. Photograph by D.M. Wagner, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

Flood of May 3, 2011, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07069000, Black River at Pocahontas, Arkansas.
May 3, 2011

Flood of May 3, 2011, Black River at Pocahontas, Ark.

Flood of May 3, 2011, at USGS streamflow-gaging station 07069000, Black River at Pocahontas, Arkansas. Photograph by D.M. Wagner, Lower Mississippi-Gulf Water Science Center.

SIR 2016–5081

Image: USGS Crews Measure Flooding in Missouri
April 26, 2011

USGS Crews Measure Flooding in Missouri

USGS scientist, Paul Brenden makes a flood measurement on the Big Piney near Big Piney Missouri. 

USGS CoreCast
April 26, 2011

Flooding Hits Along the Mississippi River

2011 had been predicted to be a particularly bad year for flooding in the northern Plains and upper Midwest. Areas along the Red River in North Dakota and Minnesota and the James Rivers in the Dakotas are still experiencing flooding from snowmelt. Now extreme rainfall is causing severe flooding along the Mississippi and Ohio Rivers. Record floods are possible in some areas

Filter Total Items: 255
USGS science for a changing world logo
July 20, 2011

Flooding along the Missouri River continues as shown in Landsat satellite images of the Nebraska and Iowa border. Heavy rains and snowmelt have caused the river to remain above flood stage for an extended period.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 10, 2011

High or low flood risks can determine where wetland restoration might occur on the lower Missouri River, according to a new study by the U.S. Geological Survey Columbia Environmental Research Center and the Nature Conservancy’s Missouri River Program.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 10, 2011

The potential effects of Fayetteville Shale gas extraction on Brewer Lake and Cypress Creek, Ark. are being studied by the U.S. Geological Survey in partnership with Southwestern Energy and Conway Corporation. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 2, 2011

Coastal Louisiana has lost a wetland area the size of Delaware, equaling 1,883 square miles, over the past 78 years, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center study. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 27, 2011

A missing university official from Colombia was located using maps and geospatial data from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Science Response Vehicle (SRV) Team and the National Park Service (NPS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 27, 2011

Satellite images show large amounts of sediment throughout coastal Louisiana as a result of flooding on the Mississippi River, according to recent U.S. Geological Survey and NASA data. 

USGS and NASA are providing satellite imagery to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the State of Louisiana to assist with the flood response efforts.      

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 27, 2011

Coastal Louisiana has lost a wetland area the size of Delaware, equaling 1,883 square miles, over the past 78 years, according to a new U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center study.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 19, 2011

The opening of the Morganza Spillway to alleviate flooding on the Mississippi River is diverting water into the Morganza floodway and downstream into the Atchafalaya River, potentially impacting as much as 800,000 acres of wetlands, navigational waterways, and recreational and fishery waters in Louisiana.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 16, 2011

U.S. Geological Survey crews are measuring flooding along the Atchafalaya and Mississippi Rivers, including the Morganza and Bonnet Carre Spillways.

Several USGS streamgages located on the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers are expected to reach the highest levels recorded since 1927.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 13, 2011

Recent Landsat satellite data captured by the U.S. Geological Survey and NASA on May 10 show the major flooding of the Mississippi River around Memphis, Tenn. and along the state borders of Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, and Arkansas as seen from 438 miles above the Earth.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 11, 2011

The USGS Mississippi Water Science Center is working to provide emergency information on the flow and water level of the Mississippi River and its tributaries at critical locations throughout the State of Mississippi.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 6, 2011

USGS scientists are measuring the amount of water spilling into the New Madrid floodway as a result of the recent intentional breaching of the Birds Point Levee in Missouri. The measurements are critical for estimating how much water downstream levees will need to hold back and for predicting flood crest heights, as the remaining flood waters pass through the Mississippi River.