Unified Interior Regions

Region 5: Missouri Basin

USGS Science Centers in the Missouri Basin Region

For more information on what each center is doing in the Missouri Basin, please follow the links below!

Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

Kansas Water Science Center

Nebraska Water Science Center

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Dakota Water Science Center

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 313
Picture of a brass U.S Department of The Interior Geological Survey Flood Mark
Date Published: August 15, 2016
Status: Active

Kansas Floods

Floods in Kansas have caused millions of dollars in damage and loss of life. Nationwide, floods are responsible for more property damage and loss of life than any other natural hazard. The USGS monitors flood conditions at more than 180 streamgages across Kansas. Water level and flow information are used by the National Weather Service (NWS) to make accurate flood forecasts. Included in this...

Contacts: C Craig Painter
Crops at a farm in Kansas
Date Published: August 15, 2016
Status: Active

Parents and Degradation Products of Analysis: OGRL LCEA

Triazines and phenylureas are commonly used herbicides for controlling weeds in row crops. These herbicides and their degradation products have been found in samples collected from surface water, groundwater, and precipitation throughout the United States. Atrazine until recently was the most widely applied herbicide in the U.S. and is still a widely applied preplanting corn herbicide.

rows of herbicide treated crops
Date Published: August 15, 2016
Status: Active

Acetamide Parents and Degradation Products of Analysis: OGRL LCPD

Acetamide herbicides are used to control weeds in row crops such as corn and soybeans. Acetamide herbicides and their degradates are common contaminants in surface and groundwater. Some of the widely detected acid degradates are on the USEPA contaminant candidate list (CCL).

Test tube holder holding many test tubes.
Date Published: August 12, 2016
Status: Active

OGRL Enzyme Linked-Imunnosorbent Assay Methods of Analysis

Immunoassays are rapid screening techinques that can be used to provide data on a specific compound or class of compunds on a large number of samples. We have used these methods to conduct large scale reconnaissance studies of atrazine in rainfall and cyanobacterial toxins in the USEPA national lake and reservoir reconnaissance study.

Map of all the reservoir sediment sites going on in Kansas
Date Published: August 5, 2016

Sediment Science in Kansas

In Kansas and nationally, sediment is a concern for both physical and chemical reasons. Physically, problems caused by excessive sediment may include degraded water quality, degraded aquatic habitat, increased water-treatment costs, decreased channel capacity, clogged water intakes, and loss of water-storage capacity in reservoirs. Chemically, sediment serves as a carrier for various...

This photo of a Pacific sheath-tailed bat is the last good photo of this bat from Aguiguan in existence.
Date Published: August 1, 2016

Ecology of Insect-eating Bats

Bats are the only flying mammals that are active mostly at night and occur on all continents except Antarctica. Bats are ecologically diverse, with a range of species that specialize in feeding on fruit, nectar, blood, fish, small mammals, and insects. However, of the more than 1,100 known species of bats on Earth, the majority specialize in feeding on insects. In the United States for example...

Blue Sky and Wamego Highway Bridge over Kansas River
Date Published: July 28, 2016
Status: Active

Water-Quality Monitoring in the Lower Kansas River Basin

The Kansas River is a primary source of drinking water for about 800,000 people in northeastern Kansas. Water-quality concerns related to excessive nutrient, bacteria, and sediment concentrations have been identified by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment. Additionally, the occurrence and transport of cyanobacteria (also called blue-green algae), associated toxins, and taste-and-...

a birder on a bridge looking at the birds
Date Published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

HDgov: Multi-agency Website for Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

HDgov is an interactive and mobile-responsive online portal to interagency, academic, and non-government resources focused on the human dimensions of natural resource management. The web portal provides easy access to tools, publications, data, and methods that help ensure that the people side of natural resources is considered throughout the entire natural resource management process. The...

A crowd of people in a National Park.
Date Published: July 26, 2016
Status: Active

National Park Service Visitor Spending Effects

The National Park Service (NPS) manages the Nation’s most iconic destinations that attract millions of visitors from across the Nation and around the world. Trip-related spending by NPS visitors generates and supports a considerable amount of economic activity within park gateway communities. USGS economists collaborate with the National Park Service social science program to estimate NPS...

A cutthroat trout. Photo by James Roberts, USGS.
Date Published: July 21, 2016

Using Quantile Regression to Investigate Ecological Limiting Factors

Unexplained heterogeneity in statistical models of animal responses to their physical environment is reasonable to expect because the measured habitat resources are a constraint on—but not the sole determinant of—abundance, survival, fecundity, or fitness. The ecological understanding and reliability of management predictions based on animal habitat models can be improved by shifting focus ...

Migratory Bird Hunting Stamp
Date Published: July 21, 2016
Status: Active

North American Waterfowl Management Plan

The ultimate success of North American Waterfowl Management Plan (NAWMP) depends on maintaining relevance to stakeholders and society. In order to be relevant, a first step is to better understand what people value in regard to waterfowl and their habitats. Without this information, NAWMP population, habitat, and people objectives may not reflect stakeholder and societal values; and management...

The sunset on the main city beach in Laguna Beach, CA.
Date Published: July 19, 2016

Quantitative and Statistical Research Collaboration

Mathematical and statistical models are powerful research tools that play several important roles in conceptualizing and understanding the structure and dynamics of complicated ecological systems, including developing mechanistic hypotheses pertaining to ecological systems, designing studies that elucidate ecosystem structure and function, and extracting information from data.

Filter Total Items: 773
Chad Reese and Chuck Parrett measuring channel width for a small stream near Helena, MT.
July 11, 2017

Chad Reese and Chuck Parrett measuring channel width

Chad Reese and Chuck Parrett measuring channel width for a small stream near Helena, MT.

July 11, 2017

20th Anniversary - EROS Center Hailstorm

Softball-sized hail caused millions of dollars of damage to the USGS EROS Center 20 years ago this week. July 13, 1997, marks the date of the massive hailstorm in southeastern South Dakota. 

At the USGS EROS Center, we study land change, operate the Landsat satellites, and maintain the longest, continuously acquired collection of images of the Earth’s land surface.

Indian Creek
July 7, 2017

Indian Creek in Overland Park

Photo taken along Indian Creek in Overland Park Kansas. Two people walk along the bank in the center of the photo. Foliage covers both banks.

July 5, 2017

Return of the Yellowstone Grizzly Bear

Yellowstone grizzly bears inhabit federal, state, tribal, and private lands, and long-term research requires careful coordination across governmental levels. The Interagency Grizzly Bear Study Team (IGBST) is an interdisciplinary group of scientists and biologists responsible for long-term monitoring and research efforts on grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone

Logs and debris floating in a river
June 12, 2017

Logs and Debris in the Yellowstone River

Logs and debris are a common occurrence during recent high flows in the Yellowstone River.

Water floods over road
June 7, 2017

Easton Flood

Water floods over a road in Easton Kansas.

Person placing a pallid sturgeon into the water from the side of a boat.
June 1, 2017

Releasing a Pallid Sturgeon on the Yellowstone River

Student Services contractor, Tanner, Cox releasing a pallid sturgeon on the Yellowstone River. 

Canyon Lake
May 31, 2017

Measuring Streamflow on Rapid Creek

USGS scientists measuring streamflow on Rapid Creek above Canyon Lake and collecting water-quality samples in May 2017.

May 31, 2017

LCMAP: Revolutionizing Remote Sensing

Land Change Monitoring, Assessment, and Projection (LCMAP) - A new way of presenting where, how and why land change has occurred.
 

May 31, 2017

High Density Digital Tape (HDDT) Landsat Data Recovery

High Density Digital Tapes (HDDT) containing Landsat scenes arrive at EROS from International Cooperators located around the world. Operators use a baking process to recover the imagery from the HDDTs.
 

Filter Total Items: 277
USGS science for a changing world logo
September 24, 2009

USGS will Grant Universities $5 Million to Beef Up Public Safety Grants totaling $5 million under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act are being awarded to 13 universities nationwide to upgrade critical earthquake monitoring networks and increase public safety.

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 21, 2009

Idaho Developed Mapping Method Garners Prestigious Award. Data from earth observing Landsat satellites plays a central role in a new, award-winning type of mapping that tracks water use. Water-use maps help save taxpayer money by increasing the accuracy and effectiveness of public decisions involving water – for instance, in monitoring compliance with legal water rights. The maps are especially

USGS science for a changing world logo
September 16, 2009

Levels of chloride, a component of salt, are elevated in many urban streams and groundwater across the northern U.S., according to a new government study. Chloride levels above the recommended federal criteria set to protect aquatic life were found in more than 40 percent of urban streams tested. The study was released today by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

USGS science for a changing world logo
August 20, 2009

On August 17, someone who wanted to see how the Earth looks from 440 miles away in space downloaded the one-millionth Landsat satellite image scene from a U.S. Geological Survey web site at its Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

USGS science for a changing world logo
July 16, 2009

Water produced by the High Plains aquifer, which provides water to eight states, is generally acceptable for human consumption, irrigation, and livestock watering, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study highlighted at the summer meeting of the Western States Water Council in Park City, Utah.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 18, 2009

Take vast quantities of satellite remote sensing data. Season with time. Mix generously with information about climate, soils, and recent rainfall. These are the ingredients for the Vegetation Drought Response Index.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 5, 2009

New visual representations of South American terrain will be freely available on the web as the most complete database of its kind.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 29, 2009

A new research project will use bear hair to study trends in a threatened grizzly bear population in Montana.
The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is beginning a new research project to evaluate the effectiveness of hair sampling to monitor population trends of grizzly bears in the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) of northwestern Montana.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 28, 2009

New U.S. Geological Survey research indicates that ammonia from water used in the production of natural gas from underground coal beds in Wyoming is entering the Powder River.
"High concentrations of ammonia are toxic, particularly at some of the higher pH values found in these discharged waters," said USGS scientist Richard Smith.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 10, 2009

Nebraska residents should not be alarmed to witness a low-flying helicopter over the state's eastern terrain in mid-April.
Beginning on April 19th and lasting about one week, a helicopter monitored by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) will begin collecting and recording geologic measurements over two areas in eastern Nebraska for information about buried sand and gravel aquifers.

USGS science for a changing world logo
April 8, 2009

Dr. Thomas Loveland, Senior Scientist at the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center has been named a 2009 Fellow for the American Society for Remote Sensing and Photogrammetry. Annually, one or two professionals are awarded the fellowship for exceptional service in advancing science and the mapping sciences. 

USGS science for a changing world logo
February 2, 2009

Striking new glacier retreat photographs created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) visually illustrate the effects of climate change on Glacier National Park.
The glacier images reveal dramatic glacial decline over a century and are in line with predictions that all of the glaciers in Glacier National Park will disappear by 2030.