Unified Interior Regions

Region 5: Missouri Basin

USGS Science Centers in the Missouri Basin Region

For more information on what each center is doing in the Missouri Basin, please follow the links below!

Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

Kansas Water Science Center

Nebraska Water Science Center

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Dakota Water Science Center

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 309
Wetlands
Date Published: April 2, 2016
Status: Active

Restoring Montana Pothole Wetlands - Demonstration Sites and Adaptive Management

Geologic processes from the last ice age have generated extensive areas of pothole wetlands in several Montana landscapes. The Laurentide ice sheet, originating in the Northwest Territories, provided the dominant force in eastern Montana. Similar landscapes developed in the broad valleys of western Montana through the actions of the Cordilleran ice sheet, originating in the mountains of...

Contacts: Todd Preston
Weather radar reflecting songbirds over central and eastern North America.
Date Published: March 29, 2016

Realizing the biological potential of weather radar

The modern use of field deployed remote sensors generates large amounts of environmental data on natural systems, and this benefits natural sciences. Today’s automated sensors are fast, run nearly continuously, eliminate the need for “people power”, are cost effective to operate and maintain, and monitor the environment in ways humans cannot. The US network of more than 200 weather radars, the...

Contacts: Robb Diehl
Lamar Valley, Yellowstone National Park.
Date Published: March 18, 2016

Developing a mechanistic understanding between recent climate patterns and Aquatic Vital Signs in the Greater Yellowstone Network

The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program was established to provide park managers with a broad understanding of the status of park resources using the best available science. This program acknowledges that NPS managers are confronted with complex challenges associated with the management of dynamic landscapes responding to multiple, interacting drivers of change. To provide...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
An invasive American bullfrog with tracking device.
Date Published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

American bullfrog suppression in the Yellowstone River floodplain

The American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) has recently invaded backwater and side-channel habitats of the Yellowstone River, near Billings, Montana. In other regions, bullfrog invasions have been linked to numerous amphibian declines (e.g., Adams and Pearl 2007). Immediate management actions may be able to suppress or eradicate localized populations of bullfrogs because they are present at low...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Sampling for aquatic invasive species in the Greater Yellowstone Area.
Date Published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

An investigation of aquatic invasive species in pristine sites in the Greater Yellowstone Area

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are aquatic organisms that move into ecosystems beyond their natural, historic range and cause severe and irreversible damage to the habitats they invade. Most AIS arrive as a direct result of human activity, such as boating and angling. The threat of AIS introduction is especially high in the Greater Yellowstone Area, as humans from all over the world come to...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Thrush feeding babies.
Date Published: March 16, 2016
Status: Active

The ecology, behavior, and conservation of migratory birds

U.S. Geological Survey research contributes to conservation measures and improved management of migratory bird populations and their habitats across the United States. Migratory birds provide ecosystem benefits that include pest control, pollination of plants and serve as food sources for other wildlife. They are also a source of recreation for millions of bird watchers and enthusiasts who...

Boreal toad on a burned log.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Apex Sites

In contrast to RARMI study areas in Colorado that have 10 or more years of records of continuous population monitoring, there are fewer long-term datasets for amphibian populations in the northern Rocky Mountains. The exception is an ongoing study of Columbia spotted frogs at Lodge Creek, Yellowstone National Park. Three other long-term research and monitoring areas have been established in...

Contacts: Blake Hossack
Red spotted toad.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Apex Sites

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as...

A wolf at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana as shown in thermal imagery.
Date Published: March 15, 2016
Status: Completed

COMPLETED: Using thermal imagery to assess wolf hairloss from sarcoptic mange

Researchers at NOROCK and their partners used thermal cameras at the Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in Montana to assess the amount of heat lost under a range of environmental conditions with and without hair. These methods help scientists better understand how mange operates in wild wolves throughout the Greater...

Contacts: Paul Cross, Emily Almberg, Doug Smith, Adam Munn, Peter Hudson, John Heine, Dan Stahler, Shane Maloney
Red Eagle Fire, Montana.
Date Published: March 15, 2016

Identification of Fire Refugia in Rocky Mountain Ecosystems of the U.S. and Canada: Development and Application of the Refugium Concept for Biodiversity Conservation over Large Spatial and Temporal Scales

We described the climate space of fire regimes in northwestern North America (Whitman and others 2015), and we are refining an approach to identify fire refugia – areas that do not burn or burn with lower severity through multiple fire events. We continue our collaboration to test the function of refugia for biodiversity conservation under current and future climate and fire scenarios. We...

Contacts: Geneva W Chong
Image: Greater Sage Grouse
Date Published: March 10, 2016

Geneva Chong's Past Projects

These are Geneva Chong's past projects.

Contacts: Geneva W Chong
Collecting macroinvertebrates in Glacier National Park.
Date Published: March 2, 2016

Integrated bioassessment of imperiled alpine aquatic ecosystems using NPS vital signs and USGS research data: Implications for conservation under a warming climate

Climate warming in the mid- to high-latitudes and high-elevation mountainous regions is occurring more rapidly than anywhere else on Earth, causing extensive loss of glaciers and snowpack. The loss of glaciers in Glacier National Park (GNP) is iconic of the combined impacts of global warming and reduced snowpack−all remaining 25 glaciers are predicted to disappear by 2030. These changes will...

Filter Total Items: 767
Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage i
April 5, 2016

Haystack Creek avalanche

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage is one of the largest avalanche paths affecting the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.  

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Lake sturgeon research at the South Dakota Coop Unit. Masters students are studying movement patterns and habitat of lake sturgeon in Voyageurs National Park. 

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Lake sturgeon research at the South Dakota Coop Unit. Students are studying movement patterns and habitat of lake sturgeon in Voyageurs National Park. 

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Mike Greiner, M.S. student, South Dakota Coop Unit.  Mike is studying limnology of Bureau of Reclamation Reservoirs in North Dakota.

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Trevor Selch, Ph.D. student at the South Dakota Unit is studying effects of mercury on walleye reproduction.  Dr. Steven Chipps, AUL-Fisheries, pictured at right.

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Dan James, Ph.D. Student at the South Dakota Coop Unit.  Dan is studying the effects of a nuisance diatom species on feeding and growth of brown trout in Black Hills streams. 

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Walleye bioenergetics research at the South Dakota Coop Unit.  Ph.D. student, Mark Fincel (pictured at left) is studying the influence of gizzard shad on energetics of walleyes in Missouri River impoundments. 

March 15, 2016

Mange in Wolves of Yellowstone National Park

This video describes USGS research utilizing remote thermal imaging cameras to study the extent and impact of mange on wolves in Yellowstone National Park.

Image: Oil Pads in the North Dakota Badlands
March 14, 2016

Oil Pads in the North Dakota Badlands

A view of the badlands terrain with Bakken oil and gas production "pads" in the distance, Billings County, North Dakota. 

Image: Oil Pads in the North Dakota Badlands
March 14, 2016

Oil Pads in the North Dakota Badlands

A view of the badlands terrain with Bakken oil and gas production "pads" in the distance, Billings County, North Dakota. 

Image: Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana
March 14, 2016

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana

Hidden Lake in Glacier National Park, Montana, USA, a high mountain lake in an alpine setting. This lake is kept full of water mainly from precipitation runoff from the surrounding hills and, in the spring, from snowmelt.

Image: Memorial Stadium, University of Nebraska Cornhuskers
March 14, 2016

Memorial Stadium, University of Nebraska Cornhuskers

This image is a High Resolution Orthoimagery, 6-inch spatial resolution, Lancaster County Dataset, taken in April 2007. High Resolution Orthoimagery looks like a photograph but any distortions caused by the tilt of the camera or topography of the land have been removed, so orthoimages are geospatially accurate and can be used as maps.

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