Unified Interior Regions

Region 5: Missouri Basin

USGS Science Centers in the Missouri Basin Region

For more information on what each center is doing in the Missouri Basin, please follow the links below!

Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

Kansas Water Science Center

Nebraska Water Science Center

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Dakota Water Science Center

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 307
Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Repeat Photography Project

Repeat photography provides objective visual evidence of landscape change. USGS scientists created approximately sixty repeat photography pairs that document glacier change in Glacier National Park. These photograph pairs are available as a collection hosted by the USGS Photographic Library and are publicly available for download.  Modern (1997 to 2019) photographs were taken from precisely...

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Going-to-the-Sun Road Avalanche Forecasting Program

As the most popular attraction in Glacier National Park (GNP), the Going-to-the-Sun Road traverses scenic alpine zones and crosses the Continental Divide at Logan Pass (2026m or 6,647' elevation).  The Park closes a 56km (34.8 mile) section of the road each winter due to inclement weather, heavy snowfall, and avalanche hazards. Annual spring opening of the road is a highly anticipated event...

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Brief History of Glaciers in Glacier National Park

The history of glaciation in Glacier National Park spans thousands of years of glacial growth and recession, carving the steep and striking mountain features we see today. Glaciers have been present within the  boundaries of present-day Glacier National Park since as early as 6,500  years ago (Munroe and others, 2012). These modest glaciers varied in size, tracking climatic trends, but did not...

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Status of Glaciers in Glacier National Park

Glaciers on the Glacier National Park (GNP) landscape have ecological value as a source of cold meltwater in the otherwise dry late summer months, and aesthetic value as the park’s namesake features. USGS scientists have studied these glaciers since the late 1800s, building a body of research that documents widespread glacier change over the past century. Ongoing USGS research pairs long-term...

Date published: April 6, 2016
Status: Active

Alpine Climatology of Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park is a topographically diverse region, making localized effects of elevation, aspect, and cold air drainage several of many important factors that necessitate a diversity of long-term climate monitoring sites. Additionally, many studies have shown more rapid warming at higher elevations across the Intermountain West, but with relatively few high-elevation stations available...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Snow and Avalanche Research

Snow scientists with the USGS are unraveling specific weather, climate, and snowpack factors that contribute to large magnitude avalanches in an effort to understand these events as both a hazard and a landscape–level disturbance. The Snow and Avalanche Project (SNAP) advances our understanding of avalanche-climate interactions and wet snow avalanches, and improves public safety through...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Secondary Glacier Network

The Secondary Glacier Network includes six glaciers (Chaney, Grinnell, Stanton, Agassiz, Swiftcurrent, Jackson-Blackfoot Glaciers) that form a north-south transect of approx. 60 km through the region, with Sperry Glacier just south of center. While these glaciers will be monitored less frequently than the benchmark glacier, Sperry, this network will provide data about the variability of...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Benchmark Glacier: Sperry

Sperry Glacier was chosen as the benchmark glacier for the glacier monitoring studies, due to the combination of its topographic characteristics, historic data, and access. Annual mass balance measurements began in 2005. Sperry Glacier joined the long-established USGS Benchmark Glacier Research program in 2013 where common field and analysis methods enable regional comparison and improved...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Glacier Research

Climatic warming since the end of the Little Ice Age has resulted in substantial glacier ice loss around the world.  Most glaciers have undergone thinning and many exhibit retreat at their margins. Glacier loss triggers a cascade of hydrological and ecological effects that impact plants, animals and can create human hazard and economic hardship.  USGS scientists are using a variety of methods...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Glacier Monitoring Studies

The purpose of the CCME's glacier monitoring studies is to systematically monitor changes in Glacier National Park’s namesake glaciers and to determine the causes of changes, assess their ecological and hydrological effects, and predict future changes and effects.

...

Date published: April 2, 2016
Status: Active

Restoring Montana Pothole Wetlands - Demonstration Sites and Adaptive Management

Geologic processes from the last ice age have generated extensive areas of pothole wetlands in several Montana landscapes. The Laurentide ice sheet, originating in the Northwest Territories, provided the dominant force in eastern Montana. Similar landscapes developed in the broad valleys of western Montana through the actions of the Cordilleran ice sheet, originating in the mountains of...

Contacts: Todd Preston
Date published: March 29, 2016

Realizing the biological potential of weather radar

The modern use of field deployed remote sensors generates large amounts of environmental data on natural systems, and this benefits natural sciences. Today’s automated sensors are fast, run nearly continuously, eliminate the need for “people power”, are cost effective to operate and maintain, and monitor the environment in ways humans cannot. The US network of more than 200 weather radars, the...

Filter Total Items: 740
A person's hands with gloves on looking at a drift sampe
June 27, 2016

Processing a Drift Sample

Student Contractor Garrett Cook processes a drift sample collected on June 27 shortly after the free embryos and beads were released. Note the small cluster of pallid sturgeon free embryos and green beads in the lower portion of the sorting tray. These embryos and beads were elements of the Upper Missouri River drift experiment.

Red dye viewable in a river
June 26, 2016

Dye Delivery

The rhodamine-WT dye was injected in the river uniformly across the channel.

Scientists on a boat preparing a dye study
June 26, 2016

Dye Preparation

USGS scientists prepare to mix rhodamine-WT dye for the dye trace experiment.  The suits are to keep the harmless dye off of clothing.

Photo of a red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River near Fort Peck Dam, Montana.
June 26, 2016

Red dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River in Montana

USGS scientists conducted a dye-tracer study in June 2016 on the Missouri River about 10 miles downstream of Fort Peck Dam, Montana. The public can expect to see the Yellowstone River turn a similar color in the vicinity of the injection site when scientists conduct a dye study near Glendive, Montana in late June, 2017.

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.
June 24, 2016

Fish Swimming on Gravel Bed

Fish swim along the gravel bed bottom of the North Fork of the Flathead River.

Harmful algal blooms turn lake water brilliant green
June 24, 2016

Harmful algal bloom turns Lake Milford water emerald green

Harmful algal blooms turn water in Milford Lake emerald green

 Blackfeet Environmental Office personnel groundwater sampling
June 1, 2016

Blackfeet Environmental Office personnel groundwater sampling

USGS hydrologist trains Blackfeet Enviromental Office staff to collect groundwater samples on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation

Montana wetland
May 16, 2016

Montana wetland

Panoramic view of a Montana wetland

Mother grizzly and cub at Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park.
May 6, 2016

Mother grizzly and cub at Gibbon River, Yellowstone National Park

A USGS grizzly bear researcher snapped this picture of a mother grizzly bear and her cub in Yellowstone National Park. Adult females are the most important segment of the grizzly bear populations because they are the reproductive engine.

April 29, 2016

Perchlorate and Selected Metals in Water and Soil within Mount Rushmore National Memorial

Author interview on report "Perchlorate and selected metals in water and soil within Mount Rushmore National Memorial, South Dakota, 2011–15," U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5030. An environmental concern to water resources within Mount Rushmore National Memorial has been the annual aerial display of fireworks at the memorial for the

USGS Hydrologist lowering equipment into river
April 27, 2016

Sediment sampling Neosho River

USGS Hydrologist lowers a D-96 sediment sampler into the Neosho River using a small crane from on top a bridge at Burlingame Kansas.

Neosho River
April 27, 2016

Neosho River at Neosho Rapids

Trees line both banks of the murky Neosho River at Neosho Rapids. Some tree debris floats in the middle of the river.

Filter Total Items: 289
USGS
July 21, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey scientist Dr. Thomas J. Roffe received the Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for his outstanding contributions to wildlife health and natural resources management in the Greater Yellowstone Area during a recent meeting of the Greater Yellowstone Interagency Brucellosis Committee.

USGS
July 14, 1999

U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientist, Dr. Daniel Fagre, received the Department of the Interior’s Superior Service Award for his outstanding leadership of the Global Change Research Program in Glacier National Park, Montana.

USGS
April 5, 1999

Recent advances in genetic technology that allow scientists to study bear populations without handling bears is the topic of Katherine Kendall’s lecture scheduled for April 5 in Room 3004 at the Main Interior Building at 1849 C St., N.W., Washington, D.C. Reporters are invited to attend and cover the event. Kendall will be available to address questions following her lecture.

USGS
March 29, 1999

Recent advances in genetic technology that allow scientists to study bear populations without handling bears is the topic of Katherine Kendall’s lecture scheduled for April 1st at the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) Visitor Center. Reporters are invited to attend and cover the event. Kendall will be available to address questions following her lecture.

USGS
October 22, 1998

A recent die-off of salamanders in Utah has prompted USGS wildlife health officials to issue an October 21, 1998 wildlife health alert. The incident followed salamander die-offs earlier this summer in Maine and North Dakota. In all three cases a virus is believed to be responsible.

USGS
October 14, 1998

Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey are gaging, measuring and assessing the water levels that increased as a result of the flash floods that occurred last Sunday and Monday in the Kansas City, Mo. area, killing 11 people.

USGS
April 20, 1998

Water quality in the South Platte River Basin has been adversely affected by agriculture and urban development, according to the results of a 5-year investigation of water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
April 16, 1998

Although agriculture and urban activities have substantially affected water quality in several areas of the South Platte River Basin, concentrations of pesticides and volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), such as MTBE, are generally below levels of concern for human health, according to the results of a 5-year investigation of water quality by the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
August 1, 1997

The flood may be over but the hydrologic work continues on and is more critical than ever, was the message that U.S. Geological Survey Director Gordon Eaton gave to the troops in Bismarck Friday (Aug. 1, 1997).

USGS
April 25, 1997

As the unprecedented floodwaters of the Red River slowly begin to subside in Grand Forks, N. Dak., crews from the U.S. Geological Survey are tracking the northward movement of the water, taking measurements to help improve forecasts of the flood for evacuations upstream.

USGS
April 23, 1997

The current floods in North Dakota far exceed previous floods that occurred in 1950, 1969, 1978, 1979 and 1996, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

USGS
April 22, 1997

The flow of the Red River officially broke the 100-year-old record on Thurs. April 17, 1997, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.