Unified Interior Regions

Region 5: Missouri Basin

USGS Science Centers in the Missouri Basin Region

For more information on what each center is doing in the Missouri Basin, please follow the links below!

Wyoming - Montana Water Science Center

Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center

Kansas Water Science Center

Nebraska Water Science Center

Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center

Dakota Water Science Center

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 313
Date published: April 5, 2016

Secondary Glacier Network

The Secondary Glacier Network includes six glaciers (Chaney, Grinnell, Stanton, Agassiz, Swiftcurrent, Jackson-Blackfoot Glaciers) that form a north-south transect of approx. 60 km through the region, with Sperry Glacier just south of center. While these glaciers will be monitored less frequently than the benchmark glacier, Sperry, this network will provide data about the variability of...

Date published: April 5, 2016

Benchmark Glacier: Sperry

Sperry Glacier was chosen as the benchmark glacier for the glacier monitoring studies, due to the combination of its topographic characteristics, historic data, and access. Annual mass balance measurements began in 2005. Sperry Glacier joined the long-established USGS Benchmark Glacier Research program in 2013 where common field and analysis methods enable regional comparison and improved...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Glacier Research

As Glacier National Park’s namesake glaciers recede, CCME staff are monitoring many of the park’s glaciers to determine the causes of change, assess their ecological and hydrological effects, and predict future changes and effects. Intensive research to determine the mass balance of Sperry Glacier will determine whether small cirque glaciers like Sperry can serve as reliable indicators of...

Date published: April 5, 2016
Status: Active

Glacier Monitoring Studies

The purpose of the CCME's glacier monitoring studies is to systematically monitor changes in Glacier National Park’s namesake glaciers and to determine the causes of changes, assess their ecological and hydrological effects, and predict future changes and effects.

...

Date published: April 2, 2016
Status: Active

Restoring Montana Pothole Wetlands - Demonstration Sites and Adaptive Management

Geologic processes from the last ice age have generated extensive areas of pothole wetlands in several Montana landscapes. The Laurentide ice sheet, originating in the Northwest Territories, provided the dominant force in eastern Montana. Similar landscapes developed in the broad valleys of western Montana through the actions of the Cordilleran ice sheet, originating in the mountains of...

Contacts: Todd Preston
Date published: March 29, 2016

Realizing the biological potential of weather radar

The modern use of field deployed remote sensors generates large amounts of environmental data on natural systems, and this benefits natural sciences. Today’s automated sensors are fast, run nearly continuously, eliminate the need for “people power”, are cost effective to operate and maintain, and monitor the environment in ways humans cannot. The US network of more than 200 weather radars, the...

Contacts: Robb Diehl
Date published: March 18, 2016

Developing a mechanistic understanding between recent climate patterns and Aquatic Vital Signs in the Greater Yellowstone Network

The National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring program was established to provide park managers with a broad understanding of the status of park resources using the best available science. This program acknowledges that NPS managers are confronted with complex challenges associated with the management of dynamic landscapes responding to multiple, interacting drivers of change. To provide...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

American bullfrog suppression in the Yellowstone River floodplain

The American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) has recently invaded backwater and side-channel habitats of the Yellowstone River, near Billings, Montana. In other regions, bullfrog invasions have been linked to numerous amphibian declines (e.g., Adams and Pearl 2007). Immediate management actions may be able to suppress or eradicate localized populations of bullfrogs because they are present at low...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Date published: March 18, 2016
Status: Active

An investigation of aquatic invasive species in pristine sites in the Greater Yellowstone Area

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) are aquatic organisms that move into ecosystems beyond their natural, historic range and cause severe and irreversible damage to the habitats they invade. Most AIS arrive as a direct result of human activity, such as boating and angling. The threat of AIS introduction is especially high in the Greater Yellowstone Area, as humans from all over the world come to...

Contacts: Adam Sepulveda
Date published: March 16, 2016
Status: Active

The ecology, behavior, and conservation of migratory birds

U.S. Geological Survey research contributes to conservation measures and improved management of migratory bird populations and their habitats across the United States. Migratory birds provide ecosystem benefits that include pest control, pollination of plants and serve as food sources for other wildlife. They are also a source of recreation for millions of bird watchers and enthusiasts who...

Date published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center (NOROCK) Apex Sites

In contrast to RARMI study areas in Colorado that have 10 or more years of records of continuous population monitoring, there are fewer long-term datasets for amphibian populations in the northern Rocky Mountains. The exception is an ongoing study of Columbia spotted frogs at Lodge Creek, Yellowstone National Park. Three other long-term research and monitoring areas have been established in...

Contacts: Blake Hossack
Date published: March 15, 2016

RARMI: Fort Collins Science Center (FORT) Apex Sites

FORT is monitoring populations of amphibians at three apex sites using capture-recapture methods. Our goal in monitoring populations is to detect fluctuations in population size, sex ratio, survival, and recruitment. Through long-term monitoring, we can also address breeding phenology in relation to elevation, weather, and climate. Other specific questions can be asked about issues such as...

Filter Total Items: 778
Crossing Hungry Horse Resv en route to S Fk Flathead River streamgage
April 19, 2016

Crossing Hungry Horse Resv en route to S Fk Flathead R ab Twin Ck gage

A visit to the S Fk Flathead River above Twin Creek streamgage requires a trip across Hungry Horse Reservoir. Some mornings, the water is like glass.

Satellite image showing the fires by Oklahoma and Kansas border
April 7, 2016

Wildfires Scorch Large Swaths Along Oklahoma-Kansas Border

Using shortwave infrared, near infrared, and visible bands, these Landsat images provide a before and after look at the 350 Complex and Anderson Creek fires.

Boulder Glacier - Chapman Peak - 2007 black and white
April 7, 2016

Boulder Glacier - Chapman Peak - 2007 black and white

Boulder Glacier - Chapman Peak - 2007 black and white

A USGS scientist skis in to Dead Horse Point on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier NP.
April 6, 2016

Dead Horse Point

A USGS scientist skis in to Dead Horse Point on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier NP.

It requires heavy machinery to remove snow and debris along the road. In this image, crews are removing 20+ feet of snow from th
April 6, 2016

Heavy equipment remove snow and debris from Going-to-the-Sun Road.

It requires heavy machinery to remove snow and debris along the road. In this image, crews are removing 20+ feet of snow from the Rim Rock area near Logan Pass along the Goin-to-the-Sun Road.

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage i
April 5, 2016

Haystack Creek avalanche

Avalanche forecasters ski out to investigate the crown of a large wet slab avalanche in Haystack Creek drainage. This drainage is one of the largest avalanche paths affecting the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park.  

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Mike Greiner, M.S. student, South Dakota Coop Unit.  Mike is studying limnology of Bureau of Reclamation Reservoirs in North Dakota.

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Trevor Selch, Ph.D. student at the South Dakota Unit is studying effects of mercury on walleye reproduction.  Dr. Steven Chipps, AUL-Fisheries, pictured at right.

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Dan James, Ph.D. Student at the South Dakota Coop Unit.  Dan is studying the effects of a nuisance diatom species on feeding and growth of brown trout in Black Hills streams. 

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Walleye bioenergetics research at the South Dakota Coop Unit.  Ph.D. student, Mark Fincel (pictured at left) is studying the influence of gizzard shad on energetics of walleyes in Missouri River impoundments. 

Image: South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit
March 20, 2016

South Dakota Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Lake sturgeon research at the South Dakota Coop Unit. Masters students are studying movement patterns and habitat of lake sturgeon in Voyageurs National Park.