Unified Interior Regions

Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest

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Filter Total Items: 314
Date published: November 29, 2019
Status: Active

Using Video Imagery to Study Coastal Change: Whidbey Island

From May of 2018 through November of 2019, USGS scientists collected imagery from video cameras overlooking the coast along a beach on Whidbey Island, Island County at the northern boundary of Puget Sound in western Washington.

    Contacts: Eric Grossman
    Date published: October 23, 2019
    Status: Active

    Drivers and Impacts of North Pacific Climate Variability

    Climate model forecasts indicate an increase in extreme hydrologic events, including floods and droughts, for California and the western U.S. in the future. To better understand what the consequences of this future change in climate may be, USGS scientists are studying the frequency, magnitude, and impacts of past hydroclimate variability and extremes in the region. This project produces well-...

    Date published: September 6, 2019
    Status: Active

    PS-CoSMoS: Puget Sound Coastal Storm Modeling System

    The CoSMoS model is currently available for most of the California coast and is now being expanded to support the 4.5 million coastal residents of the Puget Sound region, with emphasis on the communities bordering the sound.

    Date published: August 5, 2019
    Status: Completed

    M5.3 2017 Soda Springs, Idaho Sequence

    - last updated September 27, 2017 1:40 PST

    Date published: July 19, 2019
    Status: Active

    Using Robots in the River: Biosurveillance at USGS streamgages

    For more than a decade, researchers around the world have shown that sampling a water body and analyzing for DNA (a method known as eDNA) is an effective method to detect an organism in the water. The challenge is that finding organisms that are not very abundant requires a lot of samples to locate this needle in a haystack.  Enter the "lab in a can", the water quality sampling and processing...

    Date published: July 15, 2019
    Status: Active

    Dynamic coastlines along the western U.S.

    The west coast of the United States is extremely complex and changeable because of tectonic activity, mountain building, and land subsidence. These active environments pose a major challenge for accurately assessing climate change impacts, since models were historically developed for more passive sandy coasts.

    Date published: June 17, 2019
    Status: Active

    Elwha River Restoration Project

    From 2011 to 2014, the Nation’s largest dam removal project to date took place in Washington State, allowing the Elwha River to once again flow unimpeded from its origin in the Olympic Mountains to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Nearly 100 years of sediment (30 million tons) had accumulated behind two dams, and about two-thirds of that (20 million tons) was released, dramatically affecting the...

    Date published: June 17, 2019
    Status: Active

    Estuarine Ecosystem Recovery in Puget Sound

    A clean and abundant sediment supply is critical for building and maintaining viable estuarine and wetland habitats. However, in many coastal regions, dikes, levees, and dams have disconnected water and sediment supply to estuarine and wetland habitats, altering sedimentation patterns, water quality, and nutrient loads. Dike and dam removal have become important methods for restoring river and...

    Date published: May 30, 2019
    Status: Active

    Quantifying suspended-sediment load and transport characteristics in the Calawah and Upper Bogachiel Rivers, Washington

    The issue: Salmonid fisheries are an important cultural and economic activity and efforts to support a thriving fisheries industry remain a major priority for the Quileute Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Land use changes can have a profound influence on basin sediment production with direct effects on fisheries (Madej and Ozaki, 2009). Studies are needed to improve...

    Filter Total Items: 188
    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Wave observations from bottom-mounted pressure sensors in Bellingham Bay, Washington from Dec 2017 to Jan 2018

    RBRduo pressure and temperature sensors (early 2015 generation), mounted on aluminum frames, were moored in shallow (< 6 m) water depths in Bellingham Bay, Washington, to capture wave heights and periods. Continuous pressure fluctuations are transformed into surface-wave observations of wave heights, periods, and frequency spectra at 30-minute intervals.

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Nearshore bathymetry data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, July 2017, collected from kayak

    This part of the data release presents bathymetry data from the Elwha River delta collected in July 2017 using a kayak. The kayak was equipped with a single-beam echosounder and a survey-grade global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver.

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Wave observations from bottom-mounted pressure sensors in Skagit Bay, Washington from Dec 2017 to Feb 2018

    RBRduo pressure and temperature sensors (early 2015 generation), mounted on aluminum frames, were moored in shallow (< 6 m) water depths in Skagit Bay to capture wave heights and periods. Continuous pressure fluctuations are transformed into surface-wave observations of wave heights, periods, and frequency spectra at 30-minute intervals.

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2018

    This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2018 (USGS Field Activity Number 2018-652-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2016

    This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2016 (USGS Field Activity Number 2016-663-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2017

    This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2017 (USGS Field Activity Number 2017-666-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2015

    This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2015 (USGS Field Activity Number 2015-647-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Annual streamflow, runoff and baseflow, estimated for the period of record using six hydrograph-separation methods, for 312 gaged basins in the Northwest Volcanic Aquifer Study Area, USA, 1904-2015.

    The U.S. Geological Survey’s Water Availability and Use Study Program (WAUSP) (https://water.usgs.gov/ogw/gwrp/activities/regional.html) supports quantitative assessments of groundwater availability in areas of critical importance. As part of a WAUSP study in the arid to semi-arid Northwest Volcanic Aquifer Study Area (...

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Nearshore bathymetry of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2015

    This portion of the USGS data release presents bathymetry data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon in 2015 (USGS Field Activity Number 2015-647-FA). Bathymetry data were collected using four personal watercraft (PWCs) equipped with single-beam sonar systems and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers. The sonar sy

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2014

    This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2014 (USGS Field Activity Number 2014-631-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2019

    This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2019 (USGS Field Activity Number 2019-632-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

    Date published: January 1, 2019

    Floodplain data from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, 1939-2013

    Floodplain characteristics were quantified for the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, using orthophoto imagery taken between 1939-2013.

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    Alex Hatem and Borah Peak
    September 18, 2019

    Alex stands in front of two flavors of Borah Peak

    Alex Hatem stands in front of 1983 Borah Peak rupture with actual Borah Peak in the background. 

    August 26, 2019

    “Science is amazing”: GeoGirls explore Mount St. Helens

    During Aug. 4-8, 2019, U.S. Geological Survey women scientists, university researchers and Mount St. Helens Institute staff led 25 middle-school girls from Washington and Oregon in the fifth annual “GeoGirls” outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, Washington.
     

    small white cliff with grass on top
    August 12, 2019

    Pyroclastic Flow Outcrop on the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens

    This photo shows an outcrop of pyroclastic flow deposits near Willow Creek on the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens. The dramatic lines crossing the outcrop indicate contacts between different layers of pyroclastic flow deposits. Two participants of the 2019 GeoGirls program are shown studying the outcrop, using it to understand the eruptive history of the volcano. GeoGirls

    ...
    Girls standing in a large circle around a volcano monitoring station
    August 5, 2019

    The GeoGirls Visit a Volcano Monitoring Station at Mount St. Helens

    The GeoGirls visit a volcano monitoring station on the east side of Mount St. Helens, finding out how scientists use different monitoring methods (seismic, GPS, tiltmeter) to understand more about the volcano.

    GeoGirls 2019 group photo, with Mount St. Helens in the background
    August 5, 2019

    GeoGirls 2019 Group Photo

    GeoGirls 2019 group photo, with Mount St. Helens in the background.

    Girls hike along a trail at Mount St. Helens
    August 5, 2019

    GeoGirls Hike the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens

    The GeoGirls hike the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens, examining lava outcrops and volcanic sediment.

    Girls stand in circle with one pointing a paper on the ground
    August 5, 2019

    The GeoGirls Create Field Drawings

    The GeoGirls create field drawings of 1980 pyroclastic flow deposits on Mount St. Helens’ Pumice Plain.

    Columbia torrent salamander
    August 5, 2019

    Columbia torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton kezeri)

    Torrent salamanders are Northwest-U.S. endemic, headwater-stream-associated amphibian species that have a dearth of basic ecological information, but are thought to be highly vulnerable to habitat changes. This taxon currently has two candidates for listing by the Endangered Species Act: the Cascade torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton cascadae) and the Columbia

    ...
    Girls stand in stream and take measurements
    August 5, 2019

    GeoGirls Hike to Willow Creek

    GeoGirls hike to Willow Creek, on Mount St. Helens’ Pumice Plain, to learn more about the ecology of the blast zone and how the area has recovered since the catastrophic May 18, 1980, eruption. Here, they look at stream characteristics and how it has influenced the return of life to the area.

    People standing with lights in a dark cave
    August 4, 2019

    GeoGirls Venture into Ape Cave

    GeoGirls venture into Ape Cave, a 2,000-year-old lava tube on the south flank of Mount St. Helens, as they learn about Mount St. Helens’ eruptive history and lava flows.

    Filter Total Items: 422
    SR530 OSO Landslide Sediment Transport
    March 20, 2019

    The Oso (SR 530) Landslide in Washington - Five Years Later 

    The following is an updated version of a story first published in March of 2015.

    two teenage girls facing camera, one flashing peace sign. Outdoors
    October 15, 2018

    Mount St. Helens volcano loomed in the distance as 25 middle-school “GeoGirls” signed in, received a name tag, dropped their overnight gear and gathered in a grassy open space to meet camp staff, women scientists and volunteers.

    animated satellite images showing sediment outflow over time from Elwha River
    September 5, 2018

    Starting in 2011, the National Park Service removed two obsolete dams from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington. It was the world’s largest dam-removal project. Over the next five years, water carrying newly freed rocks, sand, silt and old tree trunks reshaped more than 13 miles of river and built a larger delta into the Pacific Ocean.

    Lava dome within the Mount St Helens' crater, 1980-86 (right) and t...
    September 3, 2018

    The atypical location of Mount St. Helens may be due to geologic structures that control where deep magmas can rise through the crust, as suggested by new findings published today in Nature Geoscience.

    8 young women with giant red ballon. snow-covered mountain in background.
    July 26, 2018

    Twenty-five middle-school girls from Washington and Oregon are participating in the fourth annual “GeoGirls” outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, jointly organized by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mount St. Helens Institute.

    poster/flier advertizing open house at USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, May 12, 2018
    May 1, 2018

    MEDIA ADVISORY

    Have you ever wondered what scientists do at a volcano observatory when a volcano is not erupting? There is plenty to accomplish—probably more than you can imagine.

    Large snow-covered, cone shaped mountain in background, looming over urban area in foreground
    April 30, 2018

    May is Volcano Preparedness Month in Washington, providing residents an opportunity to become more familiar with volcanic risk in their communities and learn about steps they can take to reduce potential impacts.

    Bear Lake to Receive Water Quality and Weather Monitoring Equipment
    March 30, 2018

    Bear Lake will house water quality and weather monitoring equipment that will provide near real-time information to the public and water managers beginning in early April and continuing through 2022.

    A muddy river in the background flows into a clear river in the foreground.
    November 1, 2017

    TACOMA, Wash. — The U.S. Geological Survey recently published the results of a new five-year suspended-sediment and water temperature study from the Sauk River. The purpose of this study is to improve understanding of the magnitude and timing of suspended sediment from the Sauk River and its tributaries to the Skagit River.

    Aerial view of red dye in the Kootenai River
    September 18, 2017

    BONNERS FERRY, Idaho — From Sept. 24 through 29, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey will conduct dye tracer and aerial mapping studies on northern Idaho’s Kootenai River. Data from the studies will support Idaho Department of Fish and Game and Kootenai Tribe of Idaho fisheries and river restoration projects.

    Filter Total Items: 238