Unified Interior Regions

Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 295
Date published: June 17, 2019
Status: Active

Elwha River Restoration Project

From 2011 to 2014, the Nation’s largest dam removal project to date took place in Washington State, allowing the Elwha River to once again flow unimpeded from its origin in the Olympic Mountains to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Nearly 100 years of sediment (30 million tons) had accumulated behind two dams, and about two-thirds of that (20 million tons) was released, dramatically affecting the...

Date published: June 17, 2019
Status: Active

Estuarine Ecosystem Recovery in Puget Sound

A clean and abundant sediment supply is critical for building and maintaining viable estuarine and wetland habitats. However, in many coastal regions, dikes, levees, and dams have disconnected water and sediment supply to estuarine and wetland habitats, altering sedimentation patterns, water quality, and nutrient loads. Dike and dam removal have become important methods for restoring river and...

Date published: May 30, 2019
Status: Active

Quantifying suspended-sediment load and transport characteristics in the Calawah and Upper Bogachiel Rivers, Washington

The issue: Salmonid fisheries are an important cultural and economic activity and efforts to support a thriving fisheries industry remain a major priority for the Quileute Tribe on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington. Land use changes can have a profound influence on basin sediment production with direct effects on fisheries (Madej and Ozaki, 2009). Studies are needed to improve...

Date published: May 28, 2019
Status: Active

Coarse sediment delivery and routing in the White River

The Issue: Ongoing channel aggradation has reduced flow conveyance along the lower White River, increasing the flood risk in urban-suburban areas. A refined understanding of the delivery, transport and deposition of sediment in the White River, and how those processes may be influenced by climate and existing dam operations, is necessary in order to plan for future flood...

Date published: May 28, 2019
Status: Active

Fine sediment infiltration in Chinook spawning gravels in the Sauk River Basin, Washington

The Issue: There is concern that inherently high finer-grained (small gravel, sand, and silt) sediment loads in the Sauk River system may adversely affect egg-to-fry survival of ESA-listed Chinook salmon in the Sauk River and lower Skagit River Basin. However, there are no quantitative data for the Sauk River basin to assess if fine sediment deposition and infiltration into...

Date published: May 23, 2019
Status: Active

Cheatgrass and Medusahead

Invasive annual grasses, such as cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae), are one of the most significant stressors to rangeland ecosystems in the western U.S. Their expansion and dominance across this area are the most damaging ecosystem agents on this iconic landscape.

Date published: May 8, 2019
Status: Active

Southeast Sound Groundwater Flow Model

The Issue: Groundwater is an important resource for domestic, commercial, and industrial usage in the Puyallup River and Chambers-Clover Creek Watersheds, and groundwater discharge helps maintain late-summer and early-fall streamflow (baseflow) in many area streams. Consequently, as the population grows, and commercial and industrial activity increase, so does the demand for...

Date published: March 26, 2019
Status: Active

Defining Native Ranges of U.S. Inland Fishes

Understanding the native versus non-native range of a species can provide useful information about dispersal, population distribution patterns, and human mediated movement across hydrologic barriers. The USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Program is working with partners to define native ranges of inland fishes in the United States to help identify which species should be included in the...

Date published: March 5, 2019
Status: Active

The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Flood and Storm Tracker (FaST)

Storm-related flooding can lead to the potential spread of nonindigenous (or non-native) aquatic species into waterways they have not been seen in before. The USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species program has developed an innovative mapping tool to help natural resource managers with post-storm nonindigenous aquatic species detection and assessment efforts. 

Filter Total Items: 188
Date published: January 1, 2019

Nearshore bathymetry data from the Elwha River delta, Washington, July 2017, collected from kayak

This part of the data release presents bathymetry data from the Elwha River delta collected in July 2017 using a kayak. The kayak was equipped with a single-beam echosounder and a survey-grade global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receiver.

Date published: January 1, 2019

Wave observations from bottom-mounted pressure sensors in Skagit Bay, Washington from Dec 2017 to Feb 2018

RBRduo pressure and temperature sensors (early 2015 generation), mounted on aluminum frames, were moored in shallow (< 6 m) water depths in Skagit Bay to capture wave heights and periods. Continuous pressure fluctuations are transformed into surface-wave observations of wave heights, periods, and frequency spectra at 30-minute intervals.

Date published: January 1, 2019

Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2018

This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2018 (USGS Field Activity Number 2018-652-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

Date published: January 1, 2019

Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2017

This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2017 (USGS Field Activity Number 2017-666-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

Date published: January 1, 2019

Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2015

This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2015 (USGS Field Activity Number 2015-647-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

Date published: January 1, 2019

Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2016

This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2016 (USGS Field Activity Number 2016-663-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

Date published: January 1, 2019

Annual streamflow, runoff and baseflow, estimated for the period of record using six hydrograph-separation methods, for 312 gaged basins in the Northwest Volcanic Aquifer Study Area, USA, 1904-2015.

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Water Availability and Use Study Program (WAUSP) (https://water.usgs.gov/ogw/gwrp/activities/regional.html) supports quantitative assessments of groundwater availability in areas of critical importance. As part of a WAUSP study in the arid to semi-arid Northwest Volcanic Aquifer Study Area (...

Date published: January 1, 2019

Nearshore bathymetry of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2015

This portion of the USGS data release presents bathymetry data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon in 2015 (USGS Field Activity Number 2015-647-FA). Bathymetry data were collected using four personal watercraft (PWCs) equipped with single-beam sonar systems and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers. The sonar sy

Date published: January 1, 2019

Nearshore bathymetry of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2014

This portion of the USGS data release presents bathymetry data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon in 2014 (USGS Field Activity Number 2014-631-FA). Bathymetry data were collected using four personal watercraft (PWCs) equipped with single-beam sonar systems and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers. The sonar sy

Date published: January 1, 2019

Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2019

This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2019 (USGS Field Activity Number 2019-632-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

Date published: January 1, 2019

Floodplain data from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, 1939-2013

Floodplain characteristics were quantified for the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington, USA, using orthophoto imagery taken between 1939-2013.

Date published: January 1, 2019

Beach topography of the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, 2014

This portion of the USGS data release presents topography data collected during surveys performed in the Columbia River littoral cell, Washington and Oregon, in 2014 (USGS Field Activity Number 2014-631-FA). Topographic profiles were collected by walking along survey lines with global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers mounted on backpacks. Prior to data collection, vertic

Filter Total Items: 1,024
Woman carries a rattlesnake with its head in a tube in one hand and snake tongs in the other
September 21, 2019

Carrying a tubed rattlesnake

Boise State University Master’s student Kristina Parker carries a Great Basin rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus lutosus). The snake’s head is enclosed in a plastic tube to allow her to safely handle it during the biological sample collection process.

rattlesnake held by snake tongs with head in a plastic tube
September 21, 2019

Tubing a rattlesnake

A Great Basin rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus lutosus) is coaxed into a plastic tube. This plastic tube allows researchers to safely handle the rattlesnake during biological sample collection.

rattlesnake held up in the air by snake tongs
September 21, 2019

Great Basin rattlesnake held by snake tongs

Great Basin rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus lutosus) held by snake tongs. The Great Basin rattlesnake is the only venomous snake in Idaho.

woman using a syringe to collect blood from a rattlesnake
September 21, 2019

Collecting a blood sample from a rattlesnake

Boise State University Master’s student Kristina Parker uses a syringe to collect blood from a Great Basin rattlesnake (Crotalus oreganus lutosus). The blood’s ribonucleic acid, or RNA will be analyzed to track genetic change in the snake from habitat disturbances. RNA, along with deoxyribonucleic acid – or DNA, are the molecules that carry genetic information.

two women use snake tongs to hold down a rattlesnake
September 21, 2019

Catching a rattlesnake with snake tongs

Boise State University Master’s student Kristina Parker and a volunteer use snake tongs to catch and hold down a rattlesnake.

Alex Hatem and Borah Peak
September 18, 2019

Alex stands in front of two flavors of Borah Peak

Alex Hatem stands in front of 1983 Borah Peak rupture with actual Borah Peak in the background. 

August 26, 2019

“Science is amazing”: GeoGirls explore Mount St. Helens

During Aug. 4-8, 2019, U.S. Geological Survey women scientists, university researchers and Mount St. Helens Institute staff led 25 middle-school girls from Washington and Oregon in the fifth annual “GeoGirls” outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, Washington.
 

small white cliff with grass on top
August 12, 2019

Pyroclastic Flow Outcrop on the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens

This photo shows an outcrop of pyroclastic flow deposits near Willow Creek on the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens. The dramatic lines crossing the outcrop indicate contacts between different layers of pyroclastic flow deposits. Two participants of the 2019 GeoGirls program are shown studying the outcrop, using it to understand the eruptive history of the volcano. GeoGirls

...
Girls standing in a large circle around a volcano monitoring station
August 5, 2019

The GeoGirls Visit a Volcano Monitoring Station at Mount St. Helens

The GeoGirls visit a volcano monitoring station on the east side of Mount St. Helens, finding out how scientists use different monitoring methods (seismic, GPS, tiltmeter) to understand more about the volcano.

GeoGirls 2019 group photo, with Mount St. Helens in the background
August 5, 2019

GeoGirls 2019 Group Photo

GeoGirls 2019 group photo, with Mount St. Helens in the background.

Girls hike along a trail at Mount St. Helens
August 5, 2019

GeoGirls Hike the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens

The GeoGirls hike the Pumice Plain at Mount St. Helens, examining lava outcrops and volcanic sediment.

Girls stand in circle with one pointing a paper on the ground
August 5, 2019

The GeoGirls Create Field Drawings

The GeoGirls create field drawings of 1980 pyroclastic flow deposits on Mount St. Helens’ Pumice Plain.

Filter Total Items: 430
USGS scientist Nancy Prouty collects deep-sea water samples as part of the EXPRESS 2019 expedition
October 30, 2019

Keep up to speed with the latest USGS deep-sea research cruise with this seafloor syntax.

Deep-sea organisms
October 16, 2019

Keep up to speed with the latest USGS deep-sea research cruise with this seafloor syntax.

Mount Hood, Oregon in early Summer....
September 18, 2019

New sensor network will help safeguard lives and property, and because of the relatively small footprint, there will be very little disturbance to the environment and wildlife in the area.

Girls standing in a large circle around a volcano monitoring station
September 11, 2019

Twenty-five middle school-age GeoGirls spent five days conducting hands-on research and interacting with female scientists, educators and older students, all while learning about active volcanoes, natural hazards and modern scientific monitoring technologies below the summit of Mount St. Helens.

headshot of Sue Phillips
September 9, 2019

CORVALLIS, Ore. — The U.S. Geological Survey has selected Sue Phillips as the new center director of the Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center. FRESC is headquartered in Corvallis, Oregon, with research offices in Corvallis; Boise, Idaho; Seattle, Washington; and Olympic National Park in Port Angeles, Washington.

Group of girls look at river
July 29, 2019

VANCOUVER, Wash. — Twenty-five middle school girls from Washington and Oregon are participating in the fifth annual GeoGirls outdoor volcano science program at Mount St. Helens, jointly organized by the U.S. Geological Survey and the Mount St. Helens Institute.

SR530 OSO Landslide Sediment Transport
March 20, 2019

The Oso (SR 530) Landslide in Washington - Five Years Later 

The following is an updated version of a story first published in March of 2015.

two teenage girls facing camera, one flashing peace sign. Outdoors
October 15, 2018

Mount St. Helens volcano loomed in the distance as 25 middle-school “GeoGirls” signed in, received a name tag, dropped their overnight gear and gathered in a grassy open space to meet camp staff, women scientists and volunteers.

animated satellite images showing sediment outflow over time from Elwha River
September 5, 2018

Starting in 2011, the National Park Service removed two obsolete dams from the Elwha River in Olympic National Park, Washington. It was the world’s largest dam-removal project. Over the next five years, water carrying newly freed rocks, sand, silt and old tree trunks reshaped more than 13 miles of river and built a larger delta into the Pacific Ocean.

Filter Total Items: 238