Unified Interior Regions

Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,025
August 3, 2014

F1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: F1 East Transect; Depth: 6.6 Meters (21.5 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.3 Kilometers (0.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15292999, -123.55011402; Site Description: This is a shallow site that is actively being buried. Substrate has converted from gravel/cobble to all sand. Lots of bivalve shell debris is

August 3, 2014

F1 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: F1 West Transect; Depth: 6.6 Meters (21.6 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.3 Kilometers (0.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15292999, -123.55078602; Site Description: This video is a good example of a site that is actively being covered in sandy sediment from the dam removals. Only the western most 6 meters of

August 2, 2014

GP2 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Control Site: GP2 West Transect; Depth: 12.7 Meters (41.6 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 18.8 Kilometers (11.6 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.12781102,-123.31712832; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand/cobble mixture surrounding boulders. Seaweed has

August 2, 2014

GP1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Control Site: GP1 East Transect; Depth: 7.7 Meters (25.1 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 19.0 Kilometers (11.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.11852521,-123.31538047; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Depth is medium-shallow. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand/cobble mixture surrounding

August 2, 2014

GP2 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Control Site: GP2 East Transect; Depth: 13.5 Meters (44.4 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 18.8 Kilometers (11.7 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.12781102,-123.31645664; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Substrate is mainly a gravel sand mixture. A few large boulders are located off

August 2, 2014

GP1 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Control Site: GP1 West Transect; Depth: 7.4 Meters (24.2 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 19.0 Kilometers (11.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.11852521,-123.31605203; Site Description: This site was established as the eastern control. Depth is medium-shallow. Substrate is mainly a gravel/sand/cobble mixture surrounding

July 23, 2014

C2 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: C2 East Transect; Depth: 16.3 Meters (Feet 53.6); Distance from river mouth: 0.7 Kilometers (0.4 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.147841,-123.57596074; Site Description: One of our deepest sites. Substrate is all muddy sand. Seaweed is absent. Woody debris is seen (0:05 0:28, 1:52 seconds). Featherduster tubeworms, mainly

July 23, 2014

C1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: C1 East Transect; Depth: Meters (Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.7 Kilometers (0.4 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.14525225,-123.57294101; Site Description: Substrate is entirely sand. All seaweeds are absent. Fragments of drift seaweed and eelgrass are seen throughout entire video. Woody debris is present (0:29, 1:

July 23, 2014

C2 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: C2 West Transect; Depth: 16.8 Meters (Feet 55.2); Distance from river mouth: 0.7 Kilometers (0.5 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.147841,-123.57663268; Site Description: One of our deepest sites. Substrate is all muddy sand. Seaweed is absent. Lots of woody debris is present (0:28, 1:52 seconds). Featherduster tubeworms,

July 23, 2014

H1 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: H1 West Transect; Depth: 5.7 Meters (Feet 18.7); Distance from river mouth: 2.4 Kilometers (1.5 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.14803012,-123.53535558; Site Description: This is a shallow site and one of the farthest removed from the effects of the sediment plume outside of the control sites. Substrate is still

July 23, 2014

C1 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: C1 West Transect; Depth: Meters (Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.7 Kilometers (0.4 Miles); Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.14525225,-123.57361291; Site Description: Substrate is entirely sand. All seaweeds are absent. Fragments of drift seaweed and eelgrass are seen throughout entire video. Invertebrates are scarce and are

July 22, 2014

J1 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: J1 West Transect; Depth: 9.6 Meters (31.5 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 6.6 Kilometers (4.1 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13607725,-123.48002186; Site Description: This site is medium depth. Substrates is mainly a gravel/sand mixture. Seaweed density is still greatly decreased. Three species of brown seaweed

Filter Total Items: 434
USGS science for a changing world logo
August 8, 2003

Wesley Ward has been named Regional Executive for Geology for the Western Region of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The announcement of Ward’s new appointment was made by John D. Buffington, Western Regional Director, effective Aug. 11, 2003.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 21, 2003

Frogs, salamanders and fishes are not exactly the first species one thinks about as wildlife affected by fire – after all, they live in water – but a special June issue of Forest Ecology and Management points out that the response of these species to habitat changes induced by fire and fuels reduction practices is highly variable.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 15, 2003

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and their partners studying the largest on-land earthquake in North America in almost 150 years report new information that will help further safety-planning efforts for future large quakes, according to an article published in the May 16, 2003, edition of the journal Science.

USGS
April 16, 2003

Experts in ecology, sociology, and legal affairs will join natural resource managers to discuss approaches to conservation of rare and poorly known plants and animals.

USGS
April 13, 2003

Non-native bullfrogs and fish from the eastern United States are teaming up against native aquatic species as they invade ponds in the Pacific Northwest, according to a U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) study published today in Ecology Letters.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 6, 2002

Standard fare in geology textbooks and school classrooms across the world is that the hot springs, geysers and volcanoes of Yellowstone National Park, Hawaii, Iceland, and many other volcanic regions were "created" by plumes of hot rock that rise from near the Earth’s core. New results from recently published U.S. Geological Survey research hint, astonishingly, that such plumes may not exist.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 3, 2002

Two reports published in a leading science journal cast doubt on the importance of ultraviolet-b radiation (UV-B) as a factor driving amphibian population declines. Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Washington, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency just released their research findings in the journal Ecology.

USGS
December 3, 2002

Two reports published in a leading science journal cast doubt on the importance of ultraviolet-b radiation (UV-B) as a factor driving amphibian population declines.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 21, 2002

Recent studies show that thinning of young forests can benefit the development of old-growth characteristics and the diversity of plants and animals, but only if methods are used that protect and promote the development of shrubs, hardwoods, and large or old trees.

USGS
November 21, 2002

Recent studies show that thinning of young forests can benefit the development of old-growth characteristics and the diversity of plants and animals, but only if methods are used that protect and promote the development of shrubs, hardwoods, and large or old trees.

USGS
January 25, 2002

In an effort to understand how future earthquakes will affect the central Puget Sound lowlands, U. S. Geological Survey scientists, working from North Seattle Community College, on January 25 will begin installing 90 seismographs to measure ground shaking throughout the region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 4, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Earth Science Information Center (ESIC), commonly known as the map sales office, located in the U.S. Post Office Building at 904 West Riverside Ave., in Spokane, Wash., will officially close on Friday, December 28, 2001.