Unified Interior Regions

Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest

Regions L2 Landing Page Tabs

Filter Total Items: 1,019
July 21, 2014

A1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: A1 East Transect; Depth: 8.2 Meters (26.9 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 1.8 Kilometers (1.1 Miles) West; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13870775, -123.5855312; Site Description: Transect is in eastern part of Freshwater Bay. Sediment is primarily sand/sandy mud. Previous small boulders appear to be buried. Seaweeds are

July 21, 2014

4SP1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: 4SP1 - East Transect; Depth: 6.5 Meters (21.2 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 0.8 Kilometers (0.5 Miles) East; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.15257, -123.556704; Site Description: The site has converted from gravel/cobble substrate to sand. Seaweed is completely absent. Dungeness crabs are seen regularly (0:06 seconds) as

July 20, 2014

K1 East Transect – 2014 - YouTube

Permanent Site: K1 East Transect; Depth: 6.6 Meters (21.8 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 4.5 Kilometers (2.8 Miles) east; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13592923,-123.5101581; Site Description: Visibility and surge was bad on this date so video is of poor quality. This is a shallow site. Sediment is a gravel/sand mixture. Seaweed was sparse

July 19, 2014

L1 East Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: L1 East Transect; Depth: 11.3 Meters (37.1 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 2.3 Kilometers (1.4 Miles) west; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13957527,-123.59359993; Site Description: This transect is medium depth. Substrate is still mainly fine sediment/sand/mud with a few scattered boulders. Seaweed is gone except small reds (

July 19, 2014

L1 West Transect – 2014

Permanent Site: L1 West Transect; Depth: 11.0 Meters (36.2 Feet); Distance from river mouth: 2.3 Kilometers (1.4 Miles) west; Pre/Post Dam Removal: 3 years post-dam removal; Lat/Long: 48.13957527,-123.59427175; Site Description: This transect is medium depth. The first 20 meters contains scattered boulders (0:18 seconds). Where there are no boulders, substrate is still

Installation of PIT tag antennas
July 3, 2014

Installation of two 20' PIT tag antennas

Installation of two 20' PIT tag antennas.  Antennas are used to monitor movements of Lost River and shortnose suckers and Redband trout through the Klamath Basin.

Northern spotted owl grabbing a mouse off a branch
July 2, 2014

Spotted Owl

Northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) are mostly non-migratory, long-lived birds whose populations have declined in mature forests of western North America.

Northern spotted owl perched on a tree branch
July 2, 2014

Spotted Owl

Northern spotted owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) are mostly non-migratory, long-lived birds whose populations have declined in mature forests of western North America.

Nisqually Delta eelgrass
June 12, 2014

Nisqually Delta eelgrass

Close-up image of Nisqually Delta eelgrass.

June 10, 2014

Water Temp Modeling Animation: Middle Fork Willamette River Reservoirs

CE-QUAL-W2 temperature model animation of Hills Creek, Lookout Point, and Dexter Reservoirs on the Middle Fork Willamette River. Data are modeled for calendar year 2011. For supporting information, see http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1186/. For supplemental and contact information, see

June 9, 2014

Water Temp Modeling Animation: Middle Fork Willamette

CE-QUAL-W2 temperature model animation of Hills Creek, Lookout Point, and Dexter Lakes on the Middle Fork Willamette River.

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USGS
December 3, 2002

Two reports published in a leading science journal cast doubt on the importance of ultraviolet-b radiation (UV-B) as a factor driving amphibian population declines.

USGS science for a changing world logo
November 21, 2002

Recent studies show that thinning of young forests can benefit the development of old-growth characteristics and the diversity of plants and animals, but only if methods are used that protect and promote the development of shrubs, hardwoods, and large or old trees.

USGS
November 21, 2002

Recent studies show that thinning of young forests can benefit the development of old-growth characteristics and the diversity of plants and animals, but only if methods are used that protect and promote the development of shrubs, hardwoods, and large or old trees.

USGS
January 25, 2002

In an effort to understand how future earthquakes will affect the central Puget Sound lowlands, U. S. Geological Survey scientists, working from North Seattle Community College, on January 25 will begin installing 90 seismographs to measure ground shaking throughout the region.

USGS science for a changing world logo
December 4, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Earth Science Information Center (ESIC), commonly known as the map sales office, located in the U.S. Post Office Building at 904 West Riverside Ave., in Spokane, Wash., will officially close on Friday, December 28, 2001.

USGS
December 4, 2001

The U.S. Geological Survey’s Earth Science Information Center (ESIC), commonly known as the map sales office, located in the U.S. Post Office Building at 904 West Riverside Ave., in Spokane, Wash., will officially close on Friday, December 28, 2001.

USGS
September 20, 2001

Anne Kinsinger, a biologist and administrator with the U.S. Geological Survey for the past nine years, is now serving as "regional biologist" for that Department of the Interior agency. Her office is located in the USGS Western Region office in the Federal Building at 909 First Avenue, in Seattle.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS
June 6, 2001

A newly released United States Geological Survey paper indicates that a significant zone of genetic mixing is occurring between northern spotted owls and California spotted owls, particularly in extreme northern California and southern Oregon.

USGS science for a changing world logo
June 1, 2001

New Maps/Report by USGS Scientists Show Underwater Features of Crater Lake in Unprecedented Detail Ancient lava flows, volcanic cones and landslides are some of the features below the surface of Crater Lake that are depicted and explained in a report available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.

USGS
June 1, 2001

New Maps/Report by USGS Scientists Show Underwater Features of Crater Lake in Unprecedented Detail Ancient lava flows, volcanic cones and landslides are some of the features below the surface of Crater Lake that are depicted and explained in a report available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior.

USGS science for a changing world logo
May 15, 2001

Ground breaking for a new home for the U.S. Geological Survey’s David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) will take place at 9 a.m., May 18, 2001, exactly 21 years after the climactic 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption that took the life of USGS geologist Dave Johnston. The new building will be located at 1300 SE Cardinal Court, in the Columbia Tech Center, in Vancouver, Wash.