Unified Interior Regions

Region 9: Columbia-Pacific Northwest

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Mount St. Helens Crater Glacier...

Mount St. Helens Crater Glacier

Map of Mount St. Helens Crater Glacier created from LiDAR data acquired September 2009.

Map of the extent of Newberry lavas including approximate ages of s...

Extent of Newberry lavas including approximate ages of surficial flows

Extending approximately 75 miles north to south and 27 miles east to west, Newberry Volcano and its broad apron of lavas (light yellow shaded area) cover a total area of almost 1,200 square miles, making it the largest volcano of the Cascades volcanic chain. Its lavas stretch north beyond Smith Rock State Park, and south almost to Fort Rock State Natural Area. The town of

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Leveling measurements of the slope of the Mount St. Helens' crater ...

Leveling measurements of the slope of the Mount St. Helens' crater ...

Tiltmeters allowed 24-hour monitoring as the information was telemetered back to CVO. Other instruments such as displacement meters for measuring cracks, seismometers for measuring earthquakes, gas sensors for measuring gas concentrations, and magnetometers for measuring the magnetic field, were also used for 24-hour monitoring. Spirit Lake is visible in the background in

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Tracking the advance of Crater Glacier at Mount St. Helens, Washing...

Tracking the advance of Crater Glacier at Mount St. Helens, WA

Information regarding volume and rates of advance for the crevassed Crater Glacier at Mount St. Helens, Washington, are extracted from Digital Elevation Models created from aerial photography. The red line shows the extent of Crater Glacier in 2012. Since 2012, the glacier has advanced about 50 m (160 ft) down the Loowit channel.

Mount St. Helens, Washington simplified hazards map showing potenti...

Mount St. Helens, WA simplified hazards map showing potential impac...

Mauve indicates areas at risk from lava flows and avalanches of hot rock and gases called pyroclastic flows. Bright red areas that fade to orange and yellow indicate potential routes for lahars (volcanic mudflows). Not shown are areas subject to hazards from volcanic ash. Volcanic ashfall is often a nuisance but can be a more serious hazard during large explosive eruptions

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