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GPS station on Mauna Loa
March 27, 2019

GPS survey is completed annually on Mauna Loa

A high-precision Global Positioning System (GPS) survey is completed annually on Mauna Loa. This station was occupied for a period of three days to supplement the continuously operating GPS stations on the volcano. A beautiful view of Mauna Kea (in distance) could seen from this site during the GPS survey. 

Mauna Loa Back to Normal...
June 22, 2018

Mauna Loa Back to Normal

View of cinder cones in the Northeast Rift Zone near the summit of Mauna Loa. View to the north-northeast with Mauna Kea in the background. Mauna Loa has erupted 33 times since 1843, most recently erupting in 1975 and 1984. Photo credit: Matt Patrick, USGS

Explosive eruptions at the summit of Mauna Loa: When did they occur...
April 12, 2018

Explosive eruptions at the summit of Mauna Loa: When did they occur?

This light gray block of rock (backpack for scale) is part of the approximately 830-year-old explosion deposit on the northwest rim of Moku‘āweoweo, the summit caldera of Mauna Loa. USGS photo by F.A. Trusdell.

April 1868 Mauna Loa eruption can be seen in this aerial photo
April 4, 2018

April 1868 Mauna Loa eruption can be seen in this aerial photo

Most of the lava flow (dark black) produced by the April 1868 Mauna Loa eruption can be seen in this aerial photo on the west (left) side of the prominent fault scarp, known informally as the Kahuku pali (formal names are Pali o Mamalu for the upper half and Pali‘okūlani for the lower half of the scarp). The large littoral cone that formed during the eruption, now named Pu

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Why are HVO scientists talking so much about Mauna Loa?...
February 15, 2018

Why are HVO scientists talking so much about Mauna Loa?

Mauna Loa, Earth's largest active volcano, has erupted 33 times since 1843, producing the lava flows shown in black. All of these historic eruptions started at the summit of the volcano. From there, the eruptions either stayed in the summit area or migrated down the volcano's Northeast or Southwest Rift Zones. Some Mauna Loa eruptions occurred at radial vents, indicated by

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Why are HVO scientists talking so much about Mauna Loa?...
February 15, 2018

Why are HVO scientists talking so much about Mauna Loa?

Mauna Loa tends to erupt large, fast-moving lava flows. About 36 hours after the 1984 eruption began on March 25, lava flowed downstream (toward bottom-right of photo) through this ‘A‘ā channel down rift from the main vent. For scale, note the USGS scientists at work on the left side of the 70-m- (77-yard-) wide lava channel.

December 3, 2017

New camera shows snowfall on summit

A new HVO webcam provides improved views of Mauna Loa's summit caldera, Moku‘āweoweo, from the northwest rim. This time-lapse sequence shows a full day on Sunday, Dec. 3, starting and ending at midnight. The full moon and sensitive low-light ability of the camera allow good views throughout the nighttime hours. Morning reveals a fresh blanket of snow, which melts

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Did aerial bombing stop the 1935 Mauna Loa lava flow?...
November 30, 2017

Did aerial bombing stop the 1935 Mauna Loa lava flow?

Aerial view of a bomb detonating on Mauna Loa near the 8500-foot elevation source of the 1935 lava flow on the morning of December 27, 1935. This was one of twenty 600-pound bombs dropped on the lava flow that morning by the Army Bombing Squadron from Luke Field, O‘ahu. Photo by Army Air Corps, 11th Photo Section.

View of Moku‘āweoweo's North Pit, looking to the west-southwest.
November 15, 2017

Moku‘āweoweo's North Pit, looking to the west-southwest

View of Moku‘āweoweo's North Pit, looking to the west-southwest. The summit of Mauna Loa is the peak visible in the background, slightly left of center. The two linear features in the foreground are ramparts from previous fissure eruptions.

November 15, 2017

Overflight of Mauna Loa's Summit Caldera

A routine helicopter overflight today provided good views of Mauna Loa's summit caldera. The video starts from the northeast end of the caldera, near North Pit, and travels southwest. In the southwest portion of the caldera, the prominent 1940 cone is followed by the 1949 cone on the caldera rim. The video ends with the steep walls of South Pit. The video is shown at 2x

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