USGS - science for a changing world

Science Topics

Maps, Imagery, and Publications Hazards Newsroom Education Jobs Partnerships Library About USGS Podcasts/RSS
You are here: Categories > Physiographic features
Help
Dunes
Low mounds, ridges, banks, or hills of loose, wind-blown granular material, either bare or covered with vegetation, capable of movement from place to place but always retaining their characteristic shape. [Adapted from Glossary of Geology, 4th ed.]
Alexandria Digital Library Feature Type Thesaurus
Subtopics:
(none)
Related topics:

Results 1 - 5 of 5 listed alphabetically [list by similarity]
PDF Coastal Change During Hurricane Dennis 2005 [More info]
Summary of study to document the impact of Hurricane Dennis on Santa Rosa Island, in the Florida Panhandle.
PDF Coastal Change During Hurricane Isabel 2003 [More info]
Summary of study to document the impact of Hurricane Isabel in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, near Cape Hatteras. Methods included pre- and post-storm photography, videography, and lidar.
PDF Coastal change during Hurricane Ivan 2004 [More info]
Summary of study to document the impact of Hurricane Ivan on the Gulf coast of Alabama near the Florida border.
Mars Global Digital Dune Database; MC-1 [More info]
Distribution and morphological character of moderate to large size dune fields on Mars from 65 degrees North to the north pole.
PDF Monitoring and analysis of sand dune movement and growth on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States [More info]
We combine long-term records from aerial photographs, detailed mapping using survey-grade GPS, and ground-based lidar with meteorological monitoring. Sand dune migration rates are currently about 35 meters per year.
Alphabetical Index of Topics a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

Accessibility FOIA Privacy Policies and Notices

Take Pride in America logo USA.gov logo U.S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
URL: http://www.usgs.gov/science//science/science.php?term=342&type=feature&order=alpha&b=0&n=20
Page Contact Information: Ask USGS