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IFSAR
Interferometric comparison of radar reflectance imagery of the same area at different times to determine changes in the land surface, typically from a space-borne sensor.
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Results 1 - 4 of 4 listed by similarity [list alphabetically]
Detection and measurement of land subsidence using Global Positioning System surveying and interferometric synthetic aperture radar, Coachella Valley, California, 1996-2005 [More info]
Detailed measurements of elevation help to understand the extent and severity of subsidence. Study asks if subsidence indicates the aquifer system is compacting temporarily or permanently, and are the changes human-induced or tectonic.
Measuring human-induced land subsidence from space [More info]
Examples of the use of Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar to measure and map changes on the Earth's surface as an aid to understanding how ground-water pumping, hydrocarbon production, or other human activities cause land subsidence.
Measuring land subsidence from space [More info]
Describes the use of satellite-borne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to precisely measure, monitor, and assess small changes in land surface elevation resulting from human-induced or naturally occuring land subsidence.
Satellite technologies detect uplift in the Yellowstone Caldera [More info]
Explanation of uplift in the land surface of the northern part of the Yellowstone caldera (12cm, about ~5 inches) that occurred between 1997 and 2003, including the scientific methods by which it was detected and analyzed.
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