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Arthropods
Invertebrates belonging to the largest phylum of animals, Arthropoda, with an exoskeleton, segmented bodies, and jointed appendages, including many subphyla and classes, such as insects, crustaceans, horseshoe crabs, sea spiders, centipedes, millipedes, and the extinct trilobites.
Subtopics:
Arachnids (1 items)
Crustaceans (11 items)
Insects (20 items)
Trilobites (1 items)
Related topics:


Results 1 - 16 of 32 listed alphabetically [list by similarity]
Apoidea -- Bees and Sphecid Wasps [More info]
Guide to the identification, biology, and ecology of bees and sphecid wasps, mostly in eastern North America.
PDF Beyond the Golden Gate--oceanography, geology, biology, and environmental issues in the Gulf of the Farallones [More info]
A geologic and oceanographic study of the waters and Continental Shelf of Gulf of the Farallones adjacent to the San Francisco Bay region. The results of the study provide a scientific basis to evaluate and monitor human impact on the marine environment.
Biological resource status and trends: Coleoptera (beetles) [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Coleoptera (beetles)
Biological resource status and trends: Crustaceans [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Crustaceans
Biological resource status and trends: Diptera (flies) [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Diptera (flies)
Biological resource status and trends: Ephemeroptera (mayflies) [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Ephemeroptera (mayflies)
Biological resource status and trends: Hymenoptera (bees and wasps) [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Hymenoptera (bees and wasps)
Biological resource status and trends: Insects [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Insects
Biological resource status and trends: Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) [More info]
Information concerning status and trends of biological resources, focusing on Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths)
Butterflies and moths of North America [More info]
Information on species of butterflies in North America with photos, checklists, distribution maps, aids to identification, and references.
Dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) of the United States [More info]
Manual on dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata), with links to photo thumbnails, checklists, distribution maps, and other Odonata information.
Early Paleozoic biochronology of the Great Basin, western United States [More info]
Publication (PDF format) in three parts on the biostratigraphy and lithostratigraphy of the Ibexian Series in the North American Ordovician, with sections on the southern Egan Range, Nevada and the biostratigraphy of the eastern Great Basin.
PDF Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program Western Pilot Project - Conditions of North Dakota Perennial Streams for Water Chemistry and Mercury in Fish Tissue, 2000-2003 [More info]
Sixty-five sampling sites, selected by a statistical design to represent lengths of perennial streams in North Dakota, were chosen to be sampled for water chemistry and mercury in fish tissue to establish unbiased baseline data.
EverView Data Viewer [More info]
Software and data to help people model the likely response of populations of organisms to various strategies that might be employed to remedy the effects of damaged ecosystems.
Free-living and parasitic copepods (including Branchiurans) of the Laurentian Great Lakes [More info]
Manual of taxonomic keys, location, and descriptive details of free-living and parasitic copepods in the Great Lakes. Viewing requires screen resolution of 1024 x 768 or above.
Invasive crayfish in the Pacific Northwest [More info]
These organisms have negative effects on local ecosystems, but we don't yet know how extensively they have spread. Here is a key to help people identify them.
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