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Remote sensing
Acquiring information about a natural feature or phenomenon, such as the Earth's surface, without actually being in contact with it. USGS remote sensing is usually carried out with airborne or spaceborne sensors or cameras.
Subtopics:
IFSAR (4 items)
LIDAR (17 items)
Aerial photography (34 items)
Aeromagnetic surveying (10 items)
Aeroradiometric surveying (1 items)
Hyperspectral imaging (5 items)
Infrared imaging (20 items)
Microwave imaging (1 items)
Multispectral imaging (26 items)
Radar imaging (4 items)
Thermal imaging (2 items)
Visible light imaging (5 items)

Remote-sensing data (38 items)
Remote-sensing images (38 items)
Composite burn index (1 items)
Normalized burn ratio (1 items)
Satellite altimetry (3 items)
Satellite images (38 items)
Related topics:


Results 101 - 110 of 169 listed by similarity [list alphabetically]
Measuring human-induced land subsidence from space [More info]
Examples of the use of Satellite Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar to measure and map changes on the Earth's surface as an aid to understanding how ground-water pumping, hydrocarbon production, or other human activities cause land subsidence.
Measuring land subsidence from space [More info]
Describes the use of satellite-borne Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) to precisely measure, monitor, and assess small changes in land surface elevation resulting from human-induced or naturally occuring land subsidence.
Mississippi River flood: April 2001 [More info]
A large collection of photographs showing the historic flooding of the upper Mississippi River near LaCrosse, Wisconsin and points south during April of 2001. Includes video footage as well.
PDF Monitoring and analysis of sand dune movement and growth on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States [More info]
We combine long-term records from aerial photographs, detailed mapping using survey-grade GPS, and ground-based lidar with meteorological monitoring. Sand dune migration rates are currently about 35 meters per year.
PDF Mount St. Helens lidar [More info]
Poster available in two sizes for downloading and printing.
Multibeam mapping of the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico [More info]
Georeferenced high-resolution mapping of bathymetry of the West Florida Shelf, Gulf of Mexico of areas suspected to be critical benthic habitats for fisheries. Includes links to images, data, metadata, and TIFF image files.
National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP) [More info]
Description of the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP) designed to cover all the lower 48 States every 5 to 7 years with a new set of aerial photographs.
National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP)- Ordering Aerial Photography [More info]
Enables locating and ordering aerial photography produced under the National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP)from the EROS data center with links to product description, prices, search & order, custom enlargements and certification.
National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards [More info]
The National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards is a multi-year undertaking to identify and quantify the vulnerability of U.S. shorelines to coastal change hazards such as the effects of severe storms, sea-level rise, and shoreline erosion and retreat.
National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project [More info]
The Coastal and Marine Geology Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting an analysis of historical shoreline changes along open-ocean sandy shores of the conterminous United States and parts of Alaska and Hawaii.
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