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New York
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See also Science in your back yard: New York

Results 31 - 40 of 42 listed alphabetically [list by similarity]
PDF The 3D Elevation Program: summary for New York [More info]
Summarizes the expected value over the next decade of the 3D Elevation Program for this state
PDF Tools for discovering and accessing Great Lakes scientific data [More info]
Web interfaces to help you find and understand scientific information about the environment in and around the Great Lakes.
Tree rings record of 100 years of hydrologic change within a wetland [More info]
Use of tree ring dating to study distinct episodes of hydrologic change in the Tully Valley wetland, New York recording history of solution-brine injection mining for salt.
PDF USGS Hydro-Climatic Data Network 2009 (HCDN?2009) [More info]
This updated subset of USGS streamgages for which the streamflow primarily reflects prevailing meteorological conditions for specified years, screened to exclude sites where human activity affects the natural flow of the watercourse.
USGS studies in the New York Bight [More info]
Describes and provides links to USGS research in the location of the estuary and coast of Long Island, New York, to map the sea floor and to study sediment transport, contaminants, and sand resources and coastal vulnerability.
Unconsolidated aquifers of upstate New York [More info]
Information on aquifers in upstate New York which consist of unconsolidated deposits of sand and gravel that occupy major river and stream valleys or lake plains. Links to aquifer maps at scales 1:24,000 or 1:250,000 and cooperative publications.
PDF United States Geological Survey fire science--Fire danger monitoring and forecasting [More info]
We use moderate resolution satellite data to assess live fuel condition for estimating fire danger. Using 23 years of vegetation condition measurements, we are able to determine the relative greenness of wildland vegetation susceptible to burning.
Upper Wallkill River study [More info]
Program to measure streamflow stage and discharge at four sites in the Upper Wallkill River Valley's Black Dirt Region and determine Total Suspended Solids (TSS) concentration data and estimate loads of TSS and sources of contaminants.
PDF Water Resources and Natural Gas Production from the Marcellus Shale [More info]
The Marcellus shale is a black shale unit in the eastern US. It has economic use as a source of natural gas. Environmental concerns arising from the process of exploiting this resource include water supply and wastewater disposal.
PDF Water quality studied in areas of unconventional oil and gas development, including areas where hydraulic fracturing techniques are used, in the United States [More info]
Maps showing number of water quality samples in areas underlain by unconventional oil and gas resources, broken out by surface water and groundwater.
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