Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – February 2, 2021

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Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand how the eruption is evolving at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

 

February 1, 2021 — Kīlauea

 

The lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active

The lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, remains active. An HVO geologist uses a laser rangefinder to measure the elevation of various spots on the lava lake surface. Today (February 2), the active, western portion of the lake was about 213 m (699 ft) deep. HVO scientists continue to monitor the eruption from an area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public for safety reasons. USGS photo taken by M. Patrick on February 1, 2021.

(Public domain.)

No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater during yesterday's helicopter overflight.

No major changes were observed at the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater during yesterday's helicopter overflight. Eruptive activity continues from the western fissure, with active surface lava largely confined to the western half of the lake. USGS photo by M. Patrick.

(Public domain.)

A closer view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater from the helicopter

A closer view of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u crater from the helicopter. Most of the lake surface in the foreground (east) is solidified on the surface, with active lava limited to the western end of the lake, in the distance. Rockfall debris can be seen on the southern margin of the lake (left side of photo). USGS photo by M. Patrick.

(Public domain.)

This thermal image taken during the February 1 helicopter overflight shows the features of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u

This thermal image taken during the February 1 helicopter overflight shows the features of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u, at the summit of Kīlauea. The eastern half of the lake is solidified at the surface, with active surface lava mostly limited to the western half. Nevertheless, small ooze-outs of lava occasionally appear along the eastern lake perimeter. The western lake is perched several meters above its base, impounded by a levee of solidified lava. Lava erupts at the western fissure and enters the lake at a small inlet site, where a narrow stream of lava pours in. During the overflight, a large overflow breached the northern levee and flowed along the northern lake margin towards the east. The temperature scale is in degrees Celsius. USGS image by M. Patrick.

(Public domain.)