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Science Snippets

Want some fun facts and interesting snippets of science? Then you came to the right place.

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Date published: May 24, 2021

Wetland Word: Blue Carbon

Coastal ecosystems, like wetlands, may be smaller in size when compared to say, a forest, but they have the ability to sequester more carbon per unit area, making them an incredible climate change mitigation tool

Date published: May 17, 2021

Wetland Word: Sequestration

Scientifically speaking, sequestration refers to the capture and storage of an element, like carbon, in the environment.   

Date published: May 13, 2021

Water Resources in Minnesota Significantly Improved by Land Restoration

Conversion of agricultural lands to wetland and native prairie greatly enhanced the quality of water resources, increased groundwater recharge and decreased floodwaters in the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study.

Date published: May 10, 2021

Wetland Word: Hydrophyte

These water-dwelling plants are found in aquatic ecosystems, including wetlands.

Date published: May 7, 2021

Wetland Word: Hydric Soil

Soil is more than just a substrate we walk on

Date published: March 8, 2021

The Case of Lost Whale Names

In which we look into whether a whale by any other name would swim as swiftly.

Date published: October 16, 2020

New Patent Helps Coalbed Methane Research

Far underground, in a Wyoming well-bore drilled through rock and coal, exciting research is bubbling up. USGS researchers are studying how bacteria and other microbes may play a role in the formation of natural gas from coal, and they’re using one of USGS’ newest patents to do it. This patent is the subsurface environmental sampler, or SES.

Date published: October 13, 2020

Using Remote Sensing to Turn Trash into Treasure

There’s an old saying that one man’s trash is another man’s treasure. At the USGS, we’re taking another look at old mine waste and tailings to see if there might still be mineral potential in them.

Date published: October 7, 2020

Bridging the Language Barrier During the Puerto Rico Earthquake

What happens when a 6.4 magnitude earthquake strikes Puerto Rico and the public needs critical information? How does a mostly English-speaking science agency reach a mostly Spanish-speaking public?

Date published: August 28, 2020

Hurricane Laura Temporarily Reverses Neches River

As Hurricane Laura came ashore near the Texas and Louisiana borders, its strong winds pushed so much water ahead of it that the Neches River even flowed backwards for a time, according to a USGS streamgage in Beaumont.

Date published: July 28, 2020

Citizen Scientist Appreciates the Opportunity to Contribute to National Mapping

A young citizen science volunteer and avid trail enthusiast enjoys “giving back” by helping to map the Nation.

Date published: July 16, 2020

USGS Scientists are Busy as a Bee

Many bumble bee species have declined in recent decades due to changes in habitat, climate, and pressures from pathogens, pesticides and introduced species. The western bumble bee, once common throughout western North America, is a species of concern and is being considered for listing by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service under the Endangered Species Act.