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Natural Hazards

Every year in the United States, natural hazards threaten lives and livelihoods and result in billions of dollars in damage. We work with many partners to monitor, assess, and conduct targeted research on a wide range of natural hazards so that policymakers and the public have the understanding they need to enhance preparedness, response, and resilience.

News

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In depth: Surprising tsunamis caused by explosive eruption in Tonga

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Massive Volcanic Eruption and Tsunami Informs Plan for Future Eruptions, Sea-level Rise

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Information Regarding Felt Earthquakes in American Samoa

Publications

Diatom influence on the production characteristics of hydrate-bearing sediments: examples from Ulleung Basin, offshore South Korea

The Ulleung Basin Gas Hydrate field expeditions in 2007 (UBGH1) and 2010 (UBGH2) sought to assess the Basin's gas hydrate resource potential. Coring operations in both expeditions recovered evidence of gas hydrate, primarily as fracture-filling (or vein type) morphologies in mainly silt-sized, fine-grained sediment, but also as pore-occupying hydrate in the coarser-grained layers of interbedded sa

U.S. strong-motion programs

No abstract available.

Flexible multimethod approach for seismic site characterization

We describe the flexible multimethod seismic site characterization technique for obtaining shear-wave velocity (VS) profiles and derivative information, such as the time-averaged VS of the upper 30 m (VS30). Simply stated, the multimethod approach relies on the application of multiple independent noninvasive site characterization acquisition and analysis techniques utilized in a flexible field-bas

Science

Remote Sensing Coastal Change

We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines.
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Remote Sensing Coastal Change

We use remote-sensing technologies—such as aerial photography, satellite imagery, structure-from-motion (SfM) photogrammetry, and lidar (laser-based surveying)—to measure coastal change along U.S. shorelines.
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Puerto Rico Landslide Hazard Mitigation Project

When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2017, it triggered more than 70,000 landslides across the island, which disrupted transportation routes, dislodged homes from their foundations on steep hillsides, and caused both direct and indirect loss of life. In the wake of the hurricane, professionals in Puerto Rico reached out to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for technical and educational...
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Puerto Rico Landslide Hazard Mitigation Project

When Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2017, it triggered more than 70,000 landslides across the island, which disrupted transportation routes, dislodged homes from their foundations on steep hillsides, and caused both direct and indirect loss of life. In the wake of the hurricane, professionals in Puerto Rico reached out to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for technical and educational...
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Interactive U.S. Landslide Data Maps

Interactive U.S. Landslide Data Maps with access to GIS data.
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Interactive U.S. Landslide Data Maps

Interactive U.S. Landslide Data Maps with access to GIS data.
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