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Natural Hazards

Every year in the United States, natural hazards threaten lives and livelihoods and result in billions of dollars in damage. We work with many partners to monitor, assess, and conduct targeted research on a wide range of natural hazards so that policymakers and the public have the understanding they need to enhance preparedness, response, and resilience.

News

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Can coral restoration reverse long-term declines in coral reef growth?

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Sound Waves Newsletter - April-June 2022

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Explore Deep-sea Data Along the Pacific Coast with EXPRESS Data Viewer

Publications

U.S. Geological Survey coastal plain amplification virtual workshop

In early October of 2020, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) held a virtual workshop to discuss Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains site-response models. Earthquake researchers came together to assess (1) research related to proposed Coastal Plains amplification models and (2) USGS plans for implementing these models. Presentations spanned a broad range of topics from Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plains

Characteristics, relationships and precision of direct acoustic-to-seismic coupling measurements from local explosions

Acoustic energy originating from explosions, sonic booms, bolides and thunderclaps have been recorded on seismometers since the 1950s. Direct pressure loading from the passing acoustic wave has been modelled and consistently observed to produce ground deformations of the near surface that have retrograde elliptical particle motions. In the past decade, increased deployments of colocated seismomete

Planetary geologic mapping protocol—2022

The Planetary Geologic Mapping Protocol covers the idealized process of compiling a NASA-funded map product of a non-terrestrial solid surface planetary body for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) publication and summarizes technical specifications of the Mapping Process for authors and reviewers. Directed by community and programmatic recommendations, the USGS Planetary Geologic Map Coordination Group

Science

Cascadia Subduction Zone Database

-a compilation of published datasets relevant to Cascadia subduction zone earthquake hazards and tectonics As part of the USGS Powell Center working group on Cascadia earthquake hazards, we compile and host several available geologic, paleoseismic, geophysical, and instrumental datasets along the Cascadia subduction zone. The ArcGIS online map and downloadable map package include both raster...
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Cascadia Subduction Zone Database

-a compilation of published datasets relevant to Cascadia subduction zone earthquake hazards and tectonics As part of the USGS Powell Center working group on Cascadia earthquake hazards, we compile and host several available geologic, paleoseismic, geophysical, and instrumental datasets along the Cascadia subduction zone. The ArcGIS online map and downloadable map package include both raster...
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Sediment Transport in Coastal Environments

Our research goals are to provide the scientific information, knowledge, and tools required to ensure that decisions about land and resource use, management practices, and future development in the coastal zone and adjacent watersheds can be evaluated with a complete understanding of the probable effects on coastal ecosystems and communities, and a full assessment of their vulnerability to natural...
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Sediment Transport in Coastal Environments

Our research goals are to provide the scientific information, knowledge, and tools required to ensure that decisions about land and resource use, management practices, and future development in the coastal zone and adjacent watersheds can be evaluated with a complete understanding of the probable effects on coastal ecosystems and communities, and a full assessment of their vulnerability to natural...
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USGS Law of the Sea

The USGS Law of the Sea project helps identify the submerged extent of the U.S. land territory beyond 200 nautical miles. This land area, called the extended continental shelf (ECS), is an important maritime zone with resources and marine habitats. Its size may exceed one million square kilometers, encompassing areas in the Arctic, Atlantic, Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific west coast. USGS...
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USGS Law of the Sea

The USGS Law of the Sea project helps identify the submerged extent of the U.S. land territory beyond 200 nautical miles. This land area, called the extended continental shelf (ECS), is an important maritime zone with resources and marine habitats. Its size may exceed one million square kilometers, encompassing areas in the Arctic, Atlantic, Bering Sea, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific west coast. USGS...
Learn More