Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – February 5, 2021

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Kīlauea's summit eruption continues on the Island of Hawai‘i; the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u erupts lava into the lava lake. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear and PPE—monitor the current eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand how the eruption is evolving at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

 

February 3, 2021 — Kīlauea

 

View of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u from the western rim of the crater, looking eastward.

View of the lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u from the western rim of the crater, looking eastward. Volcanic gases emitted from the western fissure obscure the built-up spatter cone. The active western portion of the lake (lower) has a silvery grey color, while the stagnant eastern portion of the lake (upper) is a dark duller grey. The main island is prominent within the active portion of the lake, and the smaller islands are visible in the stagnant portion. The levee on the southern (right) side is also visible. USGS photo taken by N. Deligne on February 3, 2021.

(Public domain.)

 February 1, 2021 — Kīlauea

 

An aerial view of Halema‘uma‘u crater from the northeast during a helicopter overflight of the Kīlauea summit eruption

An aerial view of Halema‘uma‘u crater from the northeast during a helicopter overflight of the Kīlauea summit eruption on February 1. The dull black color on the eastern (lower left) portion of the lava lake is the inactive surface. The more reflective silver surface is the western (upper right) active portion of the lava lake, with the gas plume marking the location of the west vent. The perched rim is visible along the perimeter of the lake. Many small islands remain in the inactive half of the lake, with only the main island located in the active half of the lava lake. UGSS photo taken by B. Carr.

(Public domain.)

Debris from a recent rockfall can be seen sitting on the solidified lava lake crust

Rockfalls have been a frequent occurrence in Halema‘uma‘u crater, both before and during the current eruption. Debris from a recent rockfall can be seen sitting on the solidified lava lake crust (center). The crust on the southern edge of the lava lake is thick enough to support the weight of the boulders that have fallen. USGS photo taken by B. Carr on February 1 during a helicopter overflight.

(Public domain.)