Photo and Video Chronology – Kīlauea – October 3, 2021

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A new eruption at Kīlauea's summit began at approximately 3:20 p.m. HST on September 29, 2021. Lava activity is currently confined within Halema'uma'u crater. Gas emissions and seismic activity at the summit remain elevated. HVO field crews—equipped with specialized safety gear—monitor the eruption from within the closed area of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park with NPS permission.

 

HVO scientists collect detailed data to assess hazards and understand how the eruption is evolving at Kīlauea's summit, all of which are shared with the National Park Service and emergency managers. Access to this hazardous area is by permission from, and in coordination with, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.

 

Wide view of the ongoing eruption within Halema'uma'u crater

There have been no major changes in the ongoing eruption at Kīlauea summit over the past day. All eruptive activity is confined within Halema‘uma‘u crater, in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The vent on the western wall and the fountain within the south-central portion of the lava lake remain the most vigorous and are producing the largest gas plumes. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission rates were measured at approximately 14,750 tonnes per day yesterday, October 2. USGS photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A wide view of the active lava lake at Kīlauea summit from the south rim of Halemaʻumaʻu

A wide view of the active lava lake at Kīlauea summit from the south rim of Halemaʻumaʻu on the morning of October 3, 2021. The west (left) and south (bottom center) vents are visible, with the west vent fountain heights measuring 10–15 meters (33–49 ft) and the south fissure fountains measuring up to 5 meters (16 ft) high. USGS photo by D. Downs.

(Credit: Drew Downs. Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea

A telephoto image of the west vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea. The west vent lava fountain remains active with sustained heights of 10–15 meters (33–49 ft). The fountain continues to build a spatter cone around it, but is mostly out of view from this vantage point on the western crater rim. USGS photo taken by D. Downs on the morning of October 3, 2021.

(Credit: Drew Downs. Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the southern lava fountain from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea summit

A telephoto image of the southern lava fountain from the south rim of Halema‘uma‘u at Kīlauea summit. This view shows most of the fissure vent that is located within the south-central part of the lava lake. The fissure is about 35 m long and has sustained low fountains heights of up to 5 meters (16 ft), with some bursts reaching up to 10 meters (33 ft) high. USGS photo taken by D. Downs on October 3, 2021.

(Credit: Drew Downs. Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the northwestern margin of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater

A telephoto image of the northwestern margin of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, Kīlauea summit. An overflow of lava from the active lava lake (center) is covering a portion of the perched levee that has formed around the margin of the lake. UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea

A telephoto image of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the south rim of the crater. The west vent continues to be the most vigorous source, with sustained lava fountain heights of 10–15 meters (33–49 ft). Spatter from the lava fountain continues to build a horseshoe-shaped cone around it. Glow from a much smaller adjacent vent to the north (upper right) is visible. UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea

A telephoto image of the west vent in Halema‘uma‘u at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the western rim of the crater. This fountain continues to produce the largest volcanic gas plume. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists continue to monitor the eruption from an area within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park that remains closed to the public due to safety reasons. UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A close-up view of the southeast margin of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater

A close-up view of the southeast margin of the lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u crater, Kīlauea summit. Over the past few days, a levee has formed around most of the lava lakes perimeter to create a lake that is perched several meters (yards) above the solidified outer rim. On October 2, the levee shown in this image was approximately 3 meters (10 ft) high. UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A telephoto image looking north at the largest island within the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at Kīlauea summit

A telephoto image looking north at the largest island within the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at Kīlauea summit. A low fountaining site along the southeast side of the main island (right), has built a small cone approximately 5 meters (16 ft) tall on the edge of the island. Occasional spatter was ejected from the vent at the top of the cone. UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the south-central lava fountain in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea

A telephoto image of the south-central lava fountain in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the south rim of the crater. This fissure continues to produce sustained lava fountain heights of 5–10 meters (16–33 ft), with occasional higher bursts of spatter. UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

A telephoto image of the south-central lava fountain in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea

A telephoto image of the south-central lava fountain in the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake at the summit of Kīlauea, taken from the western rim of the crater. This is the most vigorous fountaining source within the south and central lava lake region and is 35 meters (115 ft) long with sustained fountain heights of 5–10 meters (16–33 ft). UGSG photo taken by L. DeSmither on October 2, 2021.

(Public domain.)

 

The eruption in Halema‘uma‘u crater, at the summit of Kīlauea, continues with lava fountaining and a rising lava lake. The overflight on Friday, October 1, showed fewer fountaining sites in the center of the lake, compared to the previous day. USGS video by M. Patrick.

Matt Patrick

(Public domain.)