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Bald Eagles consume Emperor Geese during late-winter in the Aleutian Archipelago

January 1, 2004

Emperor Geese (Chen canagica) are a species of concern because their population has declined rapidly since the mid-1960s and continues to remain below management objectives (Petersen et al. 1994). Emperor Geese are restricted primarily to Alaska and exhibit an east-west migration pattern, whereby most birds begin breeding on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta by mid-May, stage on the Alaska Peninsula by late September, and migrate westward to winter in the Aleutian Archipelago from late November to mid-April (Eisenhauer and Kirkpatrick 1977, Petersen et al. 1994). Demographic and movement studies have been conducted on breeding grounds and stagmg areas (e.g., Schmutz et al. 1994, 1997); however, the winter ecology of Emperor Geese is poorly understood due in part to the extremely remote nature of the Aleutian Archipelago (Petersen et al. 1994). 

Citation Information

Publication Year 2004
Title Bald Eagles consume Emperor Geese during late-winter in the Aleutian Archipelago
DOI
Authors Mark A. Ricca, Robert G. Anthony, Jeffrey C. Williams
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Journal of Raptor Research
Series Number
Index ID 1008320
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Western Ecological Research Center