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Bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, and seafloor character of Farallon Escarpment and Rittenburg Bank, northern California

November 24, 2014

In 2011, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey’s Coastal and Marine Geology Program acquired bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data along the upper slope of the Farallon Escarpment and Rittenburg Bank within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary offshore of the San Francisco Bay area. The surveys were funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Deep Sea Coral Research and Technology Program to identify potential deep sea coral habitat prior to planned sampling efforts. Bathymetry and acoustic-backscatter data can be used to map seafloor geology (rock, sand, mud), and slope of the sea floor, both of which are useful for the prediction of deep sea coral habitat. The data also can be used for the prediction of sediment and contaminant budgets and transport, and for the assessment of earthquake and tsunami hazards. The surveys were conducted aboard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Marine Sanctuary Program’s 67-foot-long research vessel Fulmar outfitted with a U.S. Geological Survey 100-kHz Reson 7111 multibeam-echosounder system. This report provides the bathymetry and backscatter data acquired during these surveys, interpretive seafloor character maps in several formats, a summary of the mapping mission, maps of bathymetry and backscatter, and Federal Geographic Data Committee metadata.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2014
Title Bathymetry, acoustic backscatter, and seafloor character of Farallon Escarpment and Rittenburg Bank, northern California
DOI 10.3133/ofr20141234
Authors Peter Dartnell, Guy R. Cochrane, David P. Finlayson
Publication Type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Series Title Open-File Report
Series Number 2014-1234
Index ID ofr20141234
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Pacific Coastal and Marine Science Center