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Cognitive and behavioral coping in response to wildlife disease: The case of hunters and chronic wasting disease

April 30, 2021

The transactional model of stress and coping (TMSC) provides a conceptual framework for understanding adaptations to stressors like chronic wasting disease (CWD). Understanding hunter response to stressors is important because decreased participation and satisfaction can affect individual well-being, cultural traditions, agency revenue, and local economies. Using TMSC, we explored how deer hunters coped with CWD. We also compared involvement, and impacts and emotions related to CWD, inside and outside a CWD management zone. Then we examined coping related to CWD presence, and if the disease affected human health. Most hunters would cope using product shift (i.e., eating meat after a negative test result) rather than displacement (i.e., hunting elsewhere) or dropout. Hunters who may be displaced reported lower involvement in deer hunting, and increased worry about CWD. Results suggest that CWD information and testing may increase hunter worry. Funding expanded testing without prompting displacement or dropout are important management considerations.

Citation Information

Publication Year 2022
Title Cognitive and behavioral coping in response to wildlife disease: The case of hunters and chronic wasting disease
DOI 10.1080/10871209.2021.1919340
Authors Susan A. Schroeder, Adam Landon, Louis J. Cornicelli, David C. Fulton, Leslie McInenly
Publication Type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Series Title Human Dimensions of Wildlife
Index ID 70228997
Record Source USGS Publications Warehouse
USGS Organization Coop Res Unit Leetown

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