Geology and Ecology of National Parks

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park Photo Tour

 

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

A'a flow at Kaloko: A'a (blocky lava flow) near the visitor Center for Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park. This lava flow originated from the Hualalai volcano.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

The gated entrance to the beach area of Kaloko Honokohau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

A small native Hawaiian heiau (religious site) and stone walls at Kaloko Honokohau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

Hawaiian heiau at Kaloko: National Park Service interpretive display at a heiau at Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

Historic stone walls: Historic wall of basalt lava boulders near the beach at Kaloko-Honokohau National Historical Park.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

Hualalai Volcano: This view of the beach-lined cove at Kaloko shows the massive dormant Hualalai volcano in the distance. Hualalai last erupted in 1800-1801 and produced two massive flows that reached the ocean (Claque, 1990; U. S. Geological Survey, 2001).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

Rocky shore at Kaloko: Historic stone walls along the beach-lined cove at Kaloko. White pebbles coral fragments deposited by wave and storm-current litter the beach between blocks of basalt.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

Rocky shore at Kaloko: This view is looking north along the coast at Kaloko.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

Native Hawaiian building: A traditional native Hawaiian building used for work, boat storage, and living on the beach at Kaloko.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

The shallow cove at Kaloka is home to dozens of green sea turtles and other wildlife. The turtles frequently come ashore to rest. Their heads sticking from the water are a common sight in the shallows along the shore (NPS, 2006).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

This harbor on the south side of Kaloko Honokohau National Historical Park was the site of the beginning of the entertainment te

View looking south along one of the historic fishpond walls at Kaloko. Some of the historic fishpond walls have been restored in the park (NPS, 2010).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

View of Hualalai volcano beyond the coastal vegetation along the beach at Kaloko.

View of Hualalai volcano beyond the coastal vegetation along the beach at Kaloko.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

View of Hualalai volcano beyond the coastal vegetation along the beach at Kaloko.

Most of the species here are unfortuantely non-native flora, but the plants flourish on the back-beach sand that cover relatively young lava flows. Thorny mesquite (Prosopis, various species) was introduced to provide cattle with food and shade, but is now a problematic invasive throughout Hawaii (USDA, 2010).

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)

Kaloko-Honokau National Historic Park

This harbor on the south side of Kaloko Honokohau National Historical Park was the site of the beginning of the entertainment television adventure series called Gilligan's Island.

(Credit: Phil Stoffer, USGS. Public domain.)