Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - August 5, 2003

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Lava does the two step: Holei and Paliuli

 

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Looking east at small lava cascades on Paliuli. Lava comes down Holei Pali in eastern cluster of cascades fed by breakout from tube below elbow in Kohola armeters. Lava then flows through tubes across slope below Holei Pali and finally meets Paliuli.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

photo of lave

Lava cascades on Paliuli below western cluster of cascades on Holei Pali (background). Smoke comes from burning tree along edge of flow. Flow front at bottom of image has just reached coastal flat at base of Paliuli.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

photo of lave

Crack at top of Paliuli is filling with lava coming down slope from eastern cluster of cascades on Holei Pali. Note recent drapery on uphill side of crack. Height of drapery, about 3 meters.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

 

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Detail of lava flowing into crack in above image. Width of flow, about 1 meter.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

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Fan of lava building outward from Paliuli, below eastern cluster of cascades on Holei Pali. Image taken from top of Paliuli, looking southeast.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

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Photographer urging on breakout from small tumulus on slope between Holei Pali and Paliuli.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

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Small skylight in tube on slope below eastern cluster of cascades on Holei Pali. Lava flowing through this tube eventually descends Paliuli to fan shown in above image above.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

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Looking up western edge of western cluster of cascades on Holei Pali. Front of westernmost flow on slope above Paliuli is in foreground. Relief, about 40 meters.

(Credit: USGS, . Public domain.)

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Map of lava-flow field, Kilauea Volcano
May 16, 2003

Maps of lava-flow field, Kilauea Volcano

Map shows lava flows erupted during 1983-present activity of Pu`u `O`o and Kupaianaha. Red colors, both dark and light, denote Mother's Day flow, which began erupting on May 12, 2002 and continues to the present. The darkest color represents flows active since January 21, 2003.

Most recent--and ongoing--activity has produced two flows, one along western edge of flow

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