Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - February 19, 2015

Release Date:

Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow tip

Active breakouts persist upslope of stalled flow tip...

The leading tip of the June 27th flow has been stalled for several weeks, but scattered breakouts have persisted upslope. On today's overflight, one of these breakouts was active south of the stalled tip and about 650 meters (0.4 miles) northwest of the Pāhoa transfer station.

(Public domain.)

 

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows th...

This comparison of a normal photograph and a thermal image shows the position of active breakouts relative to the inactive flow tip. The white box shows the rough extent of the thermal image on the right. In the thermal image, active breakouts are visible as white and yellow areas. Although active breakouts are absent at the inactive tip of the flow, breakouts are present roughly 500 m (550 yards) behind the tip, and are also scattered further upslope.

(Public domain.)

Another view of the leading portion of the June 27th flow. Persist...

Another view of the leading portion of the June 27th flow. Persistent breakouts a short distance upslope of the stalled tip have resulted in widening of this section of the flow.

(Public domain.)

Another view of the leading portion of the June 27th flow, looking ...

Another view of the leading portion of the June 27th flow, looking upslope. Pahoa Marketplace is in the lower right corner of the photograph. Mauna Loa can be seen near the top of the photograph.

(Public domain.)

Gas plume from erupting vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater blown northward...

Vog concentrations in Hawai'i are primarily dependent on the amount of SO2 emitted from Kīlauea, the distance from the source vents, and the wind direction and speed on a given day. During trade wind conditions, areas southwest of Kīlauea and the leeward side of Hawai‘i are most frequently affected by vog. Most of the vog stays beneath an altitude of 6,000-8,000 feet above sea level, the usual height of the trade wind inversion. This layer of the atmosphere increases in temperature with altitude, inhibiting the rise of cooler, vog-laden air. When trade winds are absent, most often during winter months, the summit of Kīlauea, East Hawai‘i, the entire Island of Hawai‘i, or the entire state can be affected by vog.

(Public domain.)