Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - March 16, 2017

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Lava stream at ocean entry continues

Lava stream at ocean entry continues...

A firehose of lava continues to pour into the sea at the Kamokuna ocean entry, sending a plume of steam, hydrochloric acid, and glass particles into the air and drifting downwind. Offshore, lava entering the sea also produces plumes of hot, discolored water. The circular area of dark water in front of the entry is a region of cooler water between the split plumes of hotter water.

(Public domain.)

 

A closer view of the ocean entry and plumes of hot, discolored wate...

A closer view of the ocean entry and plumes of hot, discolored water.

(Public domain.)

A thermal image shows the two plumes of hot water extending out fro...

A thermal image shows the two plumes of hot water extending out from the ocean entry point. A circular area of cool water is directly in front of the entry point, between the two plumes. Several boats leave tracks of stirred-up cooler water cutting through the hot water on the surface.

(Public domain.)

A closer view of the lava firehose at the ocean entry. The lava st...

A closer view of the lava firehose at the ocean entry. The lava stream here is roughly 1-2 meters wide (3-6 ft), and plunges about 20 m (66 ft) into the water.

(Public domain.)

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō started as a cinder and spatter cone in the 1980s, but ov...

Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō started as a cinder and spatter cone in the 1980s, but over the past 30 years flank vents on the cone have produced stacks of lava flows, creating a broad shield around the cone. This view looks north and shows the shield shape clearly. Mauna Kea Volcano can be seen in the distance.

(Public domain.)

A lava pond has been present in a small pit in the western portion ...

A lava pond has been present in a small pit in the western portion of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Crater for nearly two years. Unusually clear views today revealed several areas of spattering, and some crustal foundering.

(Public domain.)

Lava lake in Halema‘uma‘u Crater rising over past day...

Summit inflation over the past day has driven the lava lake to rise slightly. This morning, the surface of the lake was about 23.5 m (77 ft) below the Overlook crater rim. In this photo, spattering was occurring along the southern lake margin in two locations.

(Public domain.)