Photo and Video Chronology - Kīlauea - May 11, 2018

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Clear views into the deep cavity at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō

Clear views into the deep cavity at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō...

A clear view into Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater. The upper part of the crater has a flared geometry, which narrows to a deep circular shaft. The deepest part of the crater is about 350 m (1150 ft) below the crater rim.

(Public domain.)

Video: Good weather provided clear views into Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater. The crater floor collapsed on April 30 as magma drained to the east along the East Rift Zone. Based on a 3D model constructed from thermal images, the deepest part of the crater was 350 m (1150 ft) below the crater rim.

(Public domain.)

At 9:06 a.m. HST, an explosive ash plume rose from Hale-ma'uma'u Cr...

At 9:06 a.m. HST, an ash plume rose from the Overlook crater at Kīlauea's summit. Similar to recent plumes, this event was likely caused by a rockfall from the crater's steep walls. The plume's reddish color is most likely from altered rock and ash fragments that fell into the deepening conduit.

(Public domain.)

At 9:17 a.m. HST, another explosive ash column rose from the Overlo...

At 9:17 a.m. HST, another weak ash plume rose from the Overlook Vent in Halema‘uma‘u crater, producing a slightly more energetic and darker plume. This second plume lacked the pink altered ash that was in the earlier plume, apparently consisting of more unaltered (therefore darker) rock fragments. This plume also was probably caused by rockfall into the deepening vent, not related to groundwater and steam-driven explosions.

(Public domain.)